English as a Second Language

Courses

Please note that not every course listed is offered each year and that students should consult the following sources for current course offerings:

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ENGL-1013. Introduction to Literature for International Students (ESL)

An introduction for international students to a representative sampling of fiction and poetry written in English. The course will concentrate on the acquisition of close reading skills and expository writing skills. It will also be an exploration of some of the key themes of western literature. Open only to ESL students.

1.ESL Courses

ESL-1013. English for Academic Purposes: Reading and Writing I

This course helps students whose first language is not English develop the reading and writing skills required in university studies. The reading techniques to be taught will include skimming, previewing, predicting and in-depth analyzing. The types of writing practiced will be summaries, paraphrases and essays (expository, and comparison and contrast). Vocabulary-building and grammar will also be important components of the course. Co-requisite: ESL 1033.

ESL-1023. English for Academic Purposes: Reading and Writing II

This course will help students whose first language is not English further develop academic reading and writing skills. The reading techniques to be improved will include skimming, previewing, predicting and in-depth analyzing. The types of writing practiced will be summaries, paraphrases and essays (cause and effect, and persuasive). Vocabulary-building and grammar will also be important components of the course. Students will also develop their ability to conduct library-based research and to synthesize information for writing assignments. Prerequisite: ESL 1013 or Director's permission. Co-requisite: ESL 1043.

ESL-1033. English for Academic Purposes: Speaking and Listening I

This course helps students whose first language is not English to develop the speaking and listening skills required in university studies. The basic elements of oral expression and comprehension will be studied: sounds, word and sentence stress, rhythm, intonation, comprehension of weak forms, and connected speech. Listening skills will include intensive, selective and interactive tasks, such as note-taking. Speaking functions will include presenting information, asking questions, debating. 6 hours per week. Co-requisite: ESL 1013.

ESL-1043. English for Academic Purposes: Speaking and Listening II

This course helps students whose first language is not English to develop the speaking and listening skills required in university studies. The basic elements of oral expression and comprehension will be studied: sounds, word and sentence stress, rhythm, intonation, comprehension of weak forms, and connected speech. Listening skills will include intensive, selective and interactive tasks, such as note-taking. Speaking functions will include presenting information, asking questions and debating. 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: ESL 1033 or Director's permission. Co-requisite: ESL 1023.

ESL-2213. Advanced English for Academic Purposes I

This course is designed to assist ESL students in meeting the language-related expectations of university courses. The primary focus will be on academic writing skills. Attention will also be devoted to listening, speaking, reading, grammar, and vocabulary acquisition. Language skills will be linked to academic content from a number of disciplines. The course is intended for students whose first language is not English and whose TOEFL scores are between 550 and 599 (or a recognized equivalent). Prerequisite: ESL 1023 or Director's permission.

ESL-2223. Advanced English for Academic Purposes II

This course is designed to assist ESL students in further developing their ability to meet the language-related expectations of university courses. The emphasis will be on refining writing skills. Attention will also be devoted to listening, speaking, reading, grammar, and vocabulary acquisition. Students will explore how the various language skills are interconnected in the university context. The course is intended for students whose first language is not English and whose TOEFL scores are between 550 and 599 (or a recognized equivalent). Prerequisite: ESL 2213 or Director's permission.

2.Integrated Courses

ESL-1053. Topics in Canadian Studies for ESL Students: Maritime Society

Students will learn the salient points of the geography, history, government, economics and social makeup of the Maritimes. The contributions and struggles of diverse groups living in the region will be examined, including First Nations, Acadians, English, Irish, Scottish and multicultural communities. In this interdisciplinary course, students will gain insight into the issues, problems and debates that inform Maritime society. They will also analyze the perceived status of the Maritimes within Canada and trends in the migration of Maritimers across the country.

ESL-1063. Topics in Canadian Studies for ESL Students: Maritime Arts and Culture

Students will read a representative selection, in the original English or in translation, of short stories, poems and excerpts from novels and plays from major voices of the Maritimes, including First Nations, Acadians, Anglophones and multicultural communities. Challenges posed by writing and translating regional dialects and the languages of other groups will be examined. Students will also study films, visual art and music. They will investigate the category of identity and the tensions between regional/national and inclusion/exclusion within the production of Maritime culture.

ESL-1073. Academic Course Work

This course adopts an integrated-skills approach to English for Academic Purposes (EAP), and addresses elements of EAP across all four major skill areas - reading, writing, listening and speaking. The course is designed to provide additional support and augment instruction for students who require re-enforcement of key EAP subject areas.

HUM-1003. Introduction to University Studies

This is a 3 credit-hour elective course open only to students in their first year. The goals of the course are to educate first-year students about the nature and value of liberal education; to provide students with a firmer foundation in the academic skills necessary for success in university studies; to help students make the transition to university life; and to involve students in the broader university community. The focus of the course will be the careful study of a challenging book. The course will integrate this study with the development of the following academic skills: critical reading, note taking, outlining and précis writing, grammar and writing skills, logic and analytical thinking, time management, reference and research skills, essay planning and organizing, oral presentation, effective studying, and preparing for and writing exams.

Last Published: Sat Dec 16 06:05:01 2017