English Language and Literature

Courses

Please note that not every course listed is offered each year and that students should consult the following sources for current course offerings:

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

1. Introductory Course

ENGL-1003. Introduction to Theatre

An introduction to the role, practice, and study of theatre in society. Students are introduced to key concepts and material elements in the study and practice of theatre through exposure to dramatic and historical texts, acting techniques, the technical elements of theatre, and local theatre attendance and reflection. The course is a hybrid lecture/studio course, and open to all students.

ENGL-1013. Introduction to Literature for International Students (ESL)

An introduction for international students to a representative sampling of fiction and poetry written in English. The course will concentrate on the acquisition of close reading skills and expository writing skills. It will also be an exploration of some of the key themes of western literature. Open only to ESL students.

ENGL-1016. English Literatures in History and Culture

An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

ENGL-1903. Reading and Responding to Indigenous Canadian Literatures

Students will engage with texts by indigenous Canadian writers such as Thomas King, Richard Wagamese and Rita Joe, by writing both creative and analytical responses, which will be read and discussed in class.

2. Intermediate Course

ENGL-2013. Research Methods in English

An introduction to the discipline and practice of English; specifically, the use of research and scholarly sources in academic writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 1006.

ENGL-2113. Creative Writing: Skills

A course for students interested in writing poetry, prose, and/or scripts. Along with writing assignments and workshopping (critiquing each others' work), students give presentations or blog on topics that will help them develop writing skills. This course is also open to first-year students. Prerequisite: 5-10 page sample of work submitted to the instructor at least a week before registration, or ENGL 2123.

ENGL-2123. Creative Writing: Strategies

A course for students interested in writing poetry, prose, and/or scripts. Along with writing assignments and workshopping (critiquing each others' work), students give presentations or blog on topics that will help them understand current issues relevant to writers. This course is also open to first-year students. Prerequisite: 5-10 page sample of work submitted to the instructor at least a week before registration, or ENGL 2113.

ENGL-2213. Acting and Theatre Production I

An initial exploration of the fundamental elements that combine to create theatre. Through improvisations, exercises, monologues, and scenes, students learn the techniques of acting and stagecraft to develop their awareness of the process of performance. Enrolment is restricted to those who have received permission of the instructor. This course is also open to first-year students.

ENGL-2223. The Page and the Stage

Using as focal texts scripts actually produced locally, participants in this course explore the experience of theatre. Each participant has the opportunity to learn about the ways in which a script relates to a production, about reading plays and imagining productions, about research techniques, about writing for public purposes, and about understanding and appreciating the theatre. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-2233. Acting and Theatre Production II

Continued exploration of the fundamental elements that combine to create theatre. Through improvisations, exercises, monologues, and scenes, students learn the techniques of acting and stagecraft to further their awareness of the process of performance. Enrolment is restricted to those who have received permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 2213.

ENGL-2346. Introduction to Anglo-Saxon Language and Literature

An introduction to the basics of Old English language, literature, and culture. We will read several poems including The Wanderer, The Seafarer, Wulf, The Dream of the Rood and selections of Beowulf in Old English. (Pre-1800; Language)

ENGL-2393. Literature, Technology, and Culture

This course will examine various kinds of technological change, from the invention of the printing press to the advent of the Web. We will consider how these changes have shaped our fears, expectations, and understandings of self and culture. The course will emphasize print literature while recognizing and evaluating new media. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-2413. Manga and Graphic Novels

An introduction to the related genres of manga, global manga, and graphic novels. Particular attention will be paid to the narrative strategies of manga and graphic novel creators. Works of fantasy and science fiction, as well as more realistic texts, will be explored. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-2463. Irish Literature

A survey of the major figures in twentieth century Irish literature including W.B. Yeats, James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, and Seamus Heaney. The Irish nationalism is a central focus. The course also includes a film component and features director/auteurs such as Neil Jordan and Jim Sheridan. The impact of the Irish diaspora on the literature and film of America is also considered, with special reference to Eugene O'Neill. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-2493. Atlantic Canadian Literature, Film and Art (excluding New Brunswick)

This course will study the cultural mosaic of Atlantic Canada in fiction, poetry, film, and art. We will begin with settler literature and advance to the present. (Post-1800; Canadian.)

ENGL-2503. Short Story

A survey of the short story genre from its beginnings in the 19th century to its predominance as the traditional narrative literary form of the 20th century. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-2513. Science Fiction I: The Development of Science Fiction

An introduction to the development of this genre from Shelley's Frankenstein through the Golden Age of the 1950s. Attention is paid to the related genres which contributed to the development of this genre. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-2523. Study of Drama - An Introduction

An exploration from Greek theatre to contemporary works of the theatrical conventions, significant trends, playwrights and performers that inform and construct the social practice of theatre. Emphasis is placed both on close textual study of the works and the realities of staging productions.

ENGL-2533. Comedy

An investigation of one or more types of comedy in drama and prose fiction. Attention may be paid to the role of comedy within genre systems, the cultural and historical work of comedy, and/or the comic technique in poetry and film. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-2573. Modern European Novel

This course examines representative literature in translation with a view to broadening the student's awareness of the function of art and the artist in our time. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-2583. Women Writers I (WS/GS, PEAC)

An investigation of women's writing in English before 1800, through poetry, (auto)biography, spiritual memoir, fiction, drama, and theory written by women.

ENGL-2593. Women Writers II (WS/GS PEAC)

An investigation of women's writing in English after 1800, through poetry, (auto)biography, fiction, drama, film, and theory written by women.

ENGL-2603. Survey of Children's Literature

An investigation of the variety of literature written for children: picture books, fantasy, junior fiction, poetry, nonfiction, etc., and of the role of children's literature in the classroom and the home. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-2613. History of Children's Literature

An investigation of the history of children's literature, this course uses the resources of UNB's Children's Literature Collection to explore the development of literature for children.

ENGL-2643. Medieval Drama

An introduction to the major examples of Medieval English Drama: Liturgical drama, Cycle drama, Morality plays, and secular drama. We also study Medieval stagecraft, and perform selections from cycle dramas. (Pre-1800.)

ENGL-2653. Literature and Aging (GERO)

An exploration of the way aging is portrayed and constructed in literary texts. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-2663. Literature and Medicine

An investigation of the literature of illness and healing. Poetry, prose fiction, and autobiographical writing are examined to explore the narrative modes that both distinguish and connect patient and physician. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-2673. Literature and Catholicism I

An exploration of literature from the early Middle Ages to the later Renaissance that reflects Catholic teachings, traditions, and attitudes. Readings may include The Dream of the Rood, medieval poetry, mystery and morality plays, mystical and devotional writings, and authors such as Augustine, Chaucer, Langland, Skelton, More, Southwell, and Cranshaw. (Pre-­-1800.)

ENGL-2693. Reading Popular Culture

Reading Popular Culture familiarizes students with important theoretical trends in the study of culture. Specific emphasis will be placed on key aspects of visual culture-television, film, the graphic novel, YouTube, fashion, and video games will be especially significant. We will also look at the history of leisure and entertainment to help us understand what it means to be both a producer and a consumer of popular culture. (Post-1800)

ENGL-2713. Shakespeare

A study of a selection of Shakespeare's works and his legacy. (Pre-1800.)

ENGL-2723. Fiction, Drama, and Film: A Study of Narrative I

A study of novels, short fiction, drama, and film as narrative. Students are introduced to, among other things, the major narrative techniques and innovations in the history of cinema. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-2753. Major Canadian Writers

An examination of selected writers who have made a significant contribution to Canadian literature. (Post-1800; Canadian/American literature).

ENGL-2783. Literary Nonfiction: the Art of Fact (JOUR)

An exploration of the development and practice of the literary nonfiction of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, with attention to the work of such journalists as James Agee, George Orwell, John McPhee, Joan Didion, Tracy Kidder, Lillian Ross, Hunter Thompson, Peter Gzowski, Truman Capote and others. Attention will be paid to the contexts in which literary journalists practice their craft and the extent to which it is a consciously practiced genre. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-2803. Contemporary Theory I: Language and Literature

The primary concern of this course is to familiarize students with the social, political, cultural, and philosophical presuppositions of theoretical inquiry into literary texts. We shall begin by focusing on introductory commentaries and shall proceed from there to examine certain primary theoretical texts in their specific relation to literary examples. (Post-1800; Language.)

ENGL-2813. History of the English Language

This course traces the English language from its Indo-European and Germanic origins to its current world language status. Students will explore contacts with other languages, and the social forces behind those contacts. We will also address the question of whether English constitutes one language or many. (Language)

ENGL-2926. Human Nature and Technology (GRID)

A study of the way in which diverse thinkers have considered the question of human nature. This question is sharpened with a consideration of the way in which human beings considered as natural beings use and are affected by technology. Prerequisite: GRID 2012 or permission of instructors.

ENGL-29X3. Special Topics

The content of this course changes from year to year to reflect the special strengths of the Department and the particular needs of the students. It consists of a study of a topic or an area in literature.

3. Advanced Course

ENGL-3103. Advanced Poetry Workshop

This is an advanced course for students who discovered an affinity for poetry in the introductory course(s). This course provides the opportunity for students to generate and rewrite poems. Prerequisite: ENGL 2103 or 2123.

ENGL-3113. Advanced Prose Workshop

This is an advanced course for students who discovered an affinity for creative prose in the introductory course(s). This course will provide the opportunity for students to generate and rewrite work. Prerequisite: ENGL 2103 or 2123.

ENGL-3123. Advanced Script Workshop

This is an advanced course for students who discovered an affinity for writing scripts for stage, screen, or both. It will provide the opportunity for students to generate and rewrite scripts. Prerequisite: ENGL 2103 or 2123.

ENGL-3133. Special Topics - Visual Texts

We constantly encounter texts and images together, from advertisements, through graphic novels, to the high-art work of artists like Rene Magritte. However, the part of the brain that processes images is on the opposite side of that which process text, which means that images and text are always in a state of dynamic tension. In this creative writing course, students will create and discuss work exploring that tension. Prerequisite: either ENGL 2113: Creative Writing Skills, or ENGL 2123: Creative Writing Strategies.

ENGL-3153. Literary Publishing

This course will provide students with an understanding of the current, evolving state of literary publishing in Canada. Topics can range from proposal and manuscript submission to the production, marketing, and distribution of print and electronic books. The role of publishing within wider literary culture will also be considered. Prerequisite: ENGL 2113 or 2123, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-3213. Art Cinema

An introduction to the development, influence and major trends of art cinema in the 20th century. Prerequisite: ENGL 2723. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-3216. Advanced Acting and Theatre Production

A course that focuses on the text as a performance vehicle written not only for readers, but more immediately for actors, directors, and designers. The course includes a public production. In-class presentations are also a major component of the course. Enrolment is restricted to those who have received permission from the instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 2233.

ENGL-3223. Auteur Cinema

A study of the cinema of some of the major auteurs of the 20th century. Among the artists considered are Sergei Eisenstein, Jean Renoir, Howard Hawks, Alfred Hitchcock, Luis Bunuel, Ingmar Bergman, Federico Fellini, Mike Leigh, Jean-Luc Godard, Martin Scorsese, and David Cronenberg. Prerequisite: ENGL 2723. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-3306. Middle English Literature

An introduction to the literature and language of the 14th-15th centuries. Genres studied include estates satire, fabliau, dream vision, drama, romance, chronicle, travelogue, lyric and beast fable. Major authors may include Chaucer, Gower and the Gawain-poet. (Pre-1800.)

ENGL-3313. Americans and Modernism

A survey of several of the major themes and forms of the modern movement. Topics covered include: the advent of free verse as the dominant form in modern poetry, the role of myth and history in the central works of the great moderns, and the First World War and its aftermath. (Post-1800; American)

ENGL-3316. Shakespeare and the Drama of His Age

A study of plays of Shakespeare, his predecessors, and contemporaries such as Marlowe and Jonson. (Pre-1800.)

ENGL-3323. Major Modernist Texts

A survey of the impact of the electronic age on the novel and short fiction, the birth of metafiction and the anti-novel, the feminist movement, the advent of the post-colonial, and the post-modern response. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-3326. Seventeenth Century Literature

A study of the prose and poetry of Jonson, Donne, Herbert, and Milton, and the minor writers of the age. (Pre-1800).

ENGL-3343. Advanced Old English

This course will continue the study of Old English, focussing on translation of prose and poetry. Prerequisite: ENGL 2346. (Pre-1800; Language.)

ENGL-3356. Arthurian Literature

An exploration of the extensive traditions surrounding King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table. (Pre-1800.)

ENGL-3363. The Romantic Period I

A study of the writings of William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and their contemporaries. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-3373. The Romantic Period II

A study of the writings of William Blake, Percy and Mary Shelley, and their contemporaries. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-3386. 16th Century Poetry & Prose

An exploration of the non-dramatic literature of the 16th century. A range of poetic genres including romance and the sonnet are examined as well as examples of prose fiction. Authors such as Marlowe, Sidney, Shakespeare, and Greene are included. (Pre-1800.)

ENGL-3393. Victorian Authors and Movements

A study of the works of selected British Victorian authors (such as the Brontë sisters, Eliot, Tennyson, the Brownings, the Rossetti siblings, Morris, etc.) in the context of the movements they initiated (such as the Pre-­-Raphaelites, Arts and Crafts, Socialism, Aesthetics, etc.). (Post-1800.)

ENGL-3403. Canadian Poetry

A tracing of the development of a uniquely Canadian poetic voice from the eighteenth century beginnings of Canadian poetry, through the Confederation and early modernist periods, to its flowering in Montreal in the 1950s and the west coast in the 1960s. (Post-1800; Canadian.)

ENGL-3416. American Literature

A study of the major authors of nineteenth and twentieth century American Literature. (Post-1800; American.)

ENGL-3423. Modern Irish Drama (IRSH)

A study of selected plays from the major Irish dramatists of the 20th century. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-3433. World Literature in English: West Indies and Africa (HMRT)

An introduction to the range of literary expressions of writers from the non-­Western cultures of the West Indies and Africa. The major genre studied is the novel, though poetry and essays are also examined. The focus of the course is to study the concerns of the colonized, those who were swept up by British expansion in the 18th and 19th centuries. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-3443. World Literature in English: India (HMRT)

An introduction to the range of literary expressions of writers from the Indian Subcontinent. The two major genres studied are the novel and short fiction, though poetry and essays are also examined. The focus of the course is to study the concerns of the colonized, those who were swept up by British expansion in the 18th and 19th centuries. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-3453. Roots of Canadian Theatre: Representation and Colonization

An exploration of the emergence of theatre in Canada by examining pre- and post-Confed- eration plays. This course traces Canadian theatre, from its early appearance at Annapolis Royal in 1606 to the contemporary period, with a thematic emphasis on its colonial and postcolonial roots and their representations on stage and in text. Playwrights considered may include Lescarbot, Ryga, French, Thompson, and Clements. (Post-1800; Canadian.)

ENGL-3463. Contemporary Canadian Theatre: Text, Form, and Performance

An analysis of recent Canadian plays with an emphasis on their cultural contexts, structural forms, and performance receptions. Students examine post-Centennial Canadian theatre with an emphasis on emergent writing styles and dramaturgical structures and their relationship to their cultural context. Playwrights and text creators considered may include Nowlan and Learning, Theatre Passe Murielle, Watson, Clark, Young, Hollingsworth, and Tannehill. (Post-1800; Canadian)

ENGL-3473. Irish Film II (IRSH)

In this course students will study native Irish culture and the culture of the diaspora through the medium of film. The course continues to explore the themes outlined in Irish Film I, but there is a more sustained concentration on films produced from the 1980s to the present. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-3483. Irish Film I (IRSH)

A study of native Irish culture and the culture of the Irish diaspora. Students view films of high realist auteurs as well as adaptations of novels, short stories, and plays to the big screen. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-3493. New Brunswick Literature, Film and Art

This course will study the cultural mosaic of New Brunswick in fiction, poetry, film, music, and art. We will begin with settler literature and advance to the present. This course will also undertake archival research. (Post-1800; Canadian.)

ENGL-3503. The Classical Epic

An introduction to the conventions of the epic and to classical mythology. Texts may include Epic of Gilgamesh, Homer's Iliad, and Vergil's Aeneid. All texts are in translation. (Pre-1800.)

ENGL-3513. Northern Epic

An exploration of several key non-classical epics arising out of post-Roman Europe. (Pre-1800.)

ENGL-3523. From Grub Street to Parnassus: Literature and Journalism of the Early Eighteenth Century

A study of popular writings of the early eighteenth century when literature and journalism began to differentiate from each other and to be produced and consumed, variously, as aesthetic and commercial products. (Pre-1800.)

ENGL-3533. Boundaries of the Novel and the Borders of Europe

This course explores a selection of major continental European novels in translation chosen for their formal innovations in the genre and their pertinence to critical social, political, and cultural concerns of later twentieth and early twenty-first century Europe. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-3563. Drama and Its Critics (JOUR)

This course introduces students to the history and practice of theatre reviewing with emphasis on the Canadian context from the nineteenth century to the present. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-3573. Eccentrics at the Centre: Johnson, Boswell, and Literature of the Later Eighteenth Century

A study of the formation of English literary culture in the latter half of the eighteenth century. (Pre-1800.)

ENGL-3583. Modern Theatre: Scandal, War, Morality

Through critical analysis and interpretations of influential dramatic texts, this course explores plays, playwrights, and major aesthetic movements in the theatre from the late-19th century to the mid-20th century. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-3593. Contemporary Theatre: Gender, Power, Performance

Through critical analysis and interpretation of dramatic texts, this course explores plays, playwrights, and major aesthetic movements in the theatre from the mid-twentieth century to the present. Gender, feminism, and queer theory; the avant-garde and experimental performance; violence, nationalism, and monarchy; and race, postcoloniality, and contemporary life are examined in dramatic texts and performances. (Post-1800)

ENGL-3623. The Literature of Politics

A survey of the literary treatment of political themes, from classical times to the present, in fiction, drama, poetry, essays, and film. The various themes explored include the conflict between the family and the state, nationalism, imperialism, totalitarianism, the postcolonial world, and the relationship between artist and politics. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-3643. Fantasy

An exploration of the origins and development of fantasy literature, as well as recurrent themes and contemporary issues which appear in modern fantasy.

ENGL-3656. Love and Friendship (GRID)

An exploration of the interrelated themes of friendship, love and beauty. Each theme is examined separately and as connected to the others. Ancient and modern texts are used to examine the ways that different ages have addressed these fundamentally personal and yet common human experiences. Texts vary from year to year, but may include works such as Plato's Symposium, Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Shakespeare's Merry Wives of Windsor, Rousseau's Confessions, Waugh's Brideshead Revisited, LeGuin's Left Hand of Darkness, Woolfs Orlando, and Bellows Ravelstein. Prerequisite: GRID 3006 or permission of the instructors. (Pre-1800.)

ENGL-3673. The Film of Politics

This course surveys the portrayal of political themes in selected narrative fiction films from the beginnings of cinema to the present day. Students will study the cinema of major auteurs, the movie of Hollywood and the critically acclaimed films of Art House and World Cinema. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-3706. Shakespeare and Politics (GRID)

An exploration of the works of Shakespeare in the context of Renaissance political thought as reflected in his plays and in early modern political texts. We focus on the plays, although Shakespeare's non-dramatic works may be included, as well as modern film adaptations. (Pre-1800.)

ENGL-3723. Jane Austen

An examination of the novels of Jane Austen set against the cultural contexts that produced and popularized them. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-3793. Advanced Old English: Literature and Landscape

An exploration of Anglo-Saxon poetry, with particular focus on 'elegies' and epic and their landscapes. The course focusses on the scholarship of translation: students will translate all texts themselves, taking into account the material culture, geography, geology and history of the locations around them. This course is taught in the United Kingdom, while travel- ling to various sites associated with the literature (e.g. Beowulf and Sutton Hoo; monsters and the Fens; Caedmon's Hymn and Whitby Abbey). (Pre-1800.)

ENGL-3813. Contemporary Theory III: Gender and Sexuality

An exploration of contemporary theories of gender and sexuality, focusing on the manner in which gender, sexuality, and their attendant identity politics are re-visioned in terms of their constructedness, over against normalizing conceptions of sexual identity. Readings are taken from a diversity of disciplines, including psychoanalysis, sociology, anthropology, feminism, philosophy, and literary theory. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-3823. The History of Literary Theory

An introduction to the historical texts and sources for contemporary literary theory, which explores the manner in which the questions that shape contemporary inquiry in the human sciences are precisely those that humanity has been asking for the last 3000 years. (Pre-1800.)

ENGL-3833. Contemporary Theory II: Politics and Culture

An introduction to key thinkers of the 20th century whose thought has shaped humanist inquiry across a host of disciplines. We engage these thinkers in terms of the manner in which they have re-shaped our perceptions of, and ability to engage, power and authority. (Post-1800.)

ENGL-3863. Early Dramatic Theory

This course examines influential thinking and writing about drama, theatre, and performance by philosophers, theorists, clergy, and practitioners since the classical period, with a pre-nineteenth-century emphasis. (Pre-1800.)

ENGL-3906. Freedom (GRID)

This course will examine the nature of freedom in the context of human life and community. Questions to be addressed will include: To what extent are human beings free by nature? Should political communities promote freedom? What might be appropriate limitations on our freedom? Prerequisite: GRID 2006. (Pre-1800.)

ENGL-3926. World Literature: The Muslim Imagination

An exploration of the Muslim literary imagination through the study of poetry, prose, biography, fiction, and drama produced by writers of Muslim origin from classical to modern times, interspersed with examples of its dialogue with Western poetry, fiction, drama, and prose.

ENGL-3993. Radical British Novels of the 1790s

A study of novels inspired by the ideals of the American and French revolutions and published in England in the 1790s. (Pre-1800.)

ENGL-39XX. Special Topics

The content of this course changes from year to year to reflect the special strengths of the Department and the particular needs of the students. It consists of an advanced treatment of a topic or an area in literature.

ENGL-4153. Senior Project in Creative Writing

The Senior Project gives a student the opportunity to work on an extended project, as author, translator or chief editor. Beginning with a proposal including a description of the project and a survey of similar works, students will create or compile an extended text. It is recommended that students take ENGL 4153 in their final year of study. The prerequisites are one of the following courses: ENGL 3103, 3113, 3123, or 3133 and permission of the instructor.

ENGL-4196. Honours Thesis in Creative Writing

Advanced creative writing students will choose from among the genres which they studied in their second and third year creative writing courses, to propose and then create a long project that will develop their writing habits, their depth of understanding of the genre, and their publishability. Depending on the proposal, this course may partially fulfill the post-1800 requirement. Prerequisites: Acceptance into Honours English, and one of the following courses: ENGL 3103, 3113,

ENGL-4213. Seminar in Directing for the Stage

In this capstone course in the Drama Concentration, students further explore script analysis and the practical aspects of staging theatre by reading plays and secondary sources, and engaging in exercises that explore stage composition. The course culminates in a public performance of a short play or scene directed by each student. Enrolment is restricted to those who have received permission from the instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 3216.

ENGL-4736. Medieval Epic and Romance: The Hero's Encounter with the Marvelous

We will read (in translation) medieval European epics and romances from the 8th-14th Centuries. Texts may include Beowulf, Volsungasaga, Song of Roland, Poetic Edda, The Cid and works by Chrètien de Troyes and others. Prerequisites: admission to the Honours program in English, or 3.7 GPA standing for English Majors.

ENGL-4786. Special Topics: Reading the Sonnet Honours Seminar I and II

This course offers an historical study of sonnets written in English. It will begin by looking at the historical antecedents of the sonnet form, such as Petrarch, Wyatt, and Surrey. It will emphasize the sonnet's increasing complexity as English authors such as Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Wroth, and several others develop it. Focus will be given to both sonnet sequences and occasional sonnets.

ENGL-4886. Sound and Form in English Poetry

A study of the sounds and forms of English poetry, from the 5th to the 21st century. (Pre-1800; Language).

ENGL-4896. The Occult in 20th Century Literature

An investigation into literary engagement with the occult in the 20th century. (Post-1800).

ENGL-4996. Honours Thesis Course

The supervised writing of an Honours thesis by an Honours student.

ENGL-4XX6. Honours Seminar I and II

These courses vary from year to year, and normally treat only major writers from major periods. Required for Honours students. Majors with a GPA of 3.7 or higher may enrol in an Honours Seminar, space permitting.

ENGL-4XXX. Independent Study

A course of independent study under the supervision of a member of the English Department arranged with the consent of the Chair of the Department and in consultation with the professor. Enrolment is restricted to excellent students.

Last Published: Sat Dec 16 06:05:01 2017