Great Books

Fall Semester 2017

CourseInstrDaysTime
The Quest for the Good Life
GRID.2006.A
Dinan, MatthewM W F12:30PM-02:20PM
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This course is designed to approach the perennial issue of The Quest for the Good Life through the thoughtful reading of some of the greatest works in a variety of disciplines. The texts will include ancient and modern, all selected because they speak to and illuminate this theme. Texts will vary from year to year but will include works such as Aristotle's Ethics, the Bible, Machiavelli's Prince, and Camus' The Plague.

Faith and Reason
GRID.3606.A
Hall, AlanM W F10:30AM-12:20PM
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This course will explore faith and reason as two ways by which human beings apprehend the truth, the fundamental object of our understanding. The nature and capacity of faith and reason as well as their relationship to one another will be explored through literary and philosophic texts that posit either one or both of these modes as the path to knowledge. Texts may vary from year to year, but normally the course will include works such as Aeschylus' Oresteia, The Gospel of John, Descartes' Discourse on Method, selections from Luther, and Kant's Critique of Pure Reason.

Honours Seminar
GRID.4903.A
Dinan, MatthewW F09:00AM-10:20AM
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This seminar will be centred on the intensive study of the text(s) of a thinker who has greatly influenced the shape of the western world. The texts may be ancient or modern, and may be literary, historical, philosophic, and/or political in nature.

Winter Semester 2018

CourseInstrDaysTime
Human Nature and Tech.
GRID.2206.A
Zelazny, VivienM W F10:30AM-12:20PM
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This course will study the way in which diverse thinkers have considered the question of human nature. This question will be sharpened with a consideration of the way in which human beings considered as natural beings use and are affected by technology. Texts will vary from year to year, but may include works such as: Aeschylus' Prometheus Bound, Bacon's New Atlantis, Swift's Gulliver's Travels, Grant's Technology and Empire, Miller's A Canticle for Leibowitz, Heidegger's The Question Concerning Technology, Shelley's Frankenstein, Gaskell's North and South, Achebe's Things Fall Apart, and Sterling's Holy Fire.

Love and Friendship
GRID.3106.A
Dinan, MatthewM W F12:30PM-02:20PM
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This course will explore the interrelated themes of friendship, love, and beauty. Each theme will be examined separately and as connected to the others. Ancient and modern texts will be used to examine the ways that different ages have addressed these fundamentally personal and yet common human experiences. Texts will vary from year to year, but may include works such as Plato's Symposium, Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Shakespeare's Merry Wives of Windsor, Rousseau's Confessions, Waugh's Brideshead Revisited, LeGuin's Left Hand of Darkness, Woolf's Orlando, and Bellow's Ravelstein. Prerequisite: GRID 2006, or permission of the instructors.

Honours Thesis Proposal
GRID.3903.A
Dinan, MatthewT07:00PM-09:50PM
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The purpose of this course is to afford students interested in writing an honours thesis the opportunity to develop a thorough proposal, including a substantial annotated bibliography. Students will work closely with their thesis director in developing and writing the thesis proposal. Classes will meet throughout the term to assess progress. Students will be required to present and defend their proposal before their classmates and the faculty of the Great Ideas Programme. Students must complete this course to be eligible for GRID 4906.

Capstone Seminar
GRID.4913.A
MacDonald, SaraW04:00PM-06:50PM
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The capstone seminar in Great Ideas will be an author/work specific course in which students spend an extensive period of time studying the text(s) of a thinker who has greatly influenced the shape of the western world. The author or texts may be ancient or modern, and may be literary, historical, philosophic and/or political in nature.

Capstone Seminar
GRID.4913.B
Moore, AndrewTH07:00PM-09:50PM
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The capstone seminar in Great Ideas will be an author/work specific course in which students spend an extensive period of time studying the text(s) of a thinker who has greatly influenced the shape of the western world. The author or texts may be ancient or modern, and may be literary, historical, philosophic and/or political in nature.

Last Published: Sat Dec 16 06:05:01 2017