History

Fall Semester 2017

CourseInstrDaysTime
World History
HIST.1006.A1
Robert, KarenM W F11:30AM-12:20PM
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[1. World]This course provides an overview of world history, from earliest times to the present. Major themes include human relationships with the environment, cultural exchanges between peoples, and the interconnectedness of the human experience. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1013 or HIST 1023.

World History
HIST.1006.B1
Walhain, LucM W F10:30AM-11:20AM
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[1. World]This course provides an overview of world history, from earliest times to the present. Major themes include human relationships with the environment, cultural exchanges between peoples, and the interconnectedness of the human experience. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1013 or HIST 1023.

World History I
HIST.1013.A
Watt, CareyT TH11:30AM-12:50PM
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[1. World] This 3-credit course is half of the world history survey. It gives an overview of world history events, issues, themes and approaches to about 1400 of the Common Era (CE). It covers topics such as the origins of the universe (the Big Bang & Cosmic History), Paleolithic societies, the transition to agricultural societies, the rise of major states, empires and cultural traditions, the Silk Roads, and networks of cross-cultural interaction. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1006.

Exploring History
HIST.2003.A
Watt, CareyW F09:00AM-10:20AM
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[10. Special]This mandatory course for History Majors and Honours students provides an introduction to the discipline of History. The course examines a variety of historiographical and method- ological approaches to History, as well as the history of History. It encourages students to re-examine their assumptions about History, but it will also help students develop their basic historical research and writing skills. Exploring History provides a foundation for upper-year History courses and students are strongly encouraged to take it before their third year. Prerequisite: At least 6 credit hours in History courses at St. Thomas University.

Modern Europe
HIST.2043.A
Torrie, JuliaT TH11:30AM-12:50PM
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[6. Regions (Europe)]An introduction to modern European civilization from the era of the French Revolution to the twentieth century. The course follows History 2033 chronologically but has no prerequisite. This course requires written assignments and emphasizes acceptable methods of historical research and writing.

The Material World
HIST.2103.A
Cross, BradleyM W02:30PM-03:50PM
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[1. World]This course examines themes in world history through the use and study of material objects. Histories of everyday materials and objects allow us to examine diverse issues such as the environment, history, technology, and culture. In general, historians have relied primarily on text-based sources and this course will explore the role and use of material objects in doing history. We will examine theoretical approaches to material history as well as survey the historical literature of this branch of study.

Precolonial Africa
HIST.2133.A
Gebrekidan, FikruT TH10:00AM-11:20AM
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[2. Regions (Africa)]Precolonial Africa explores the history of Africa up to the nineteenth century. Topics covered include Africa's place in hominid evolution, Africa's contribution to the Neolithic revolution, rise of the states versus stateless societies, traditional religion versus world religions, coastal societies versus inland societies, long-distance trade and the rise of empires, and domestic slavery versus transoceanic slavery and their effects on development. The objective is to challenge stereotypic notions about precolonial African societies, to contribute to students' understanding of Africa's place in early world history, and to introduce students to some of the key historiographical debates on precolonial African history.

History of the Middle Ages
HIST.2206.A1
Mullin, JanetT TH04:00PM-05:20PM
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[6. Regions (Europe)]A survey of the imagined historical period between the fall of the classical Roman/Persian Empires and the emergence of an early modern state system. This course will range widely in its coverage, including glimpses of experience in parts of Africa and Asia as well as Europe. Special emphasis will be placed on social history and the use of primary sources to probe beyond simplified political narratives.

Modern and Revolutionary China
HIST.3113.A
Walhain, LucW F09:00AM-10:20AM
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[8. State, Nation, and Locality (Asia)]This is a survey of the final century of dynastic rule in China, and the rise to power of the Nationalist and Communist parties, examining social and cultural developments, the impact of Western imperialism, and the evolution of revolutionary ideologies, up to Mao's death. Prerequisite: HIST 1006 OR HIST 1013 & HIST 1023, HIST 2173, OR permission of the instructor.

The Briti. Atlan. World
HIST.3203.A
Huskins, BonnieM W04:00PM-05:20PM
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[3. Regions (Oceans)]This course explores the social, political, and economic parameters of the Atlantic World from roughly 1500 to 1800. The course centres on the British experience of the Atlantic through a comparative and trans-national approach. Particular attention will be drawn to the role of Atlantic Canada and its connection to the larger Atlantic World.

The History Workshop
HIST.3553.A
Robert, KarenM02:30PM-05:20PM
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[10. Special]The Workshop provides students with the opportunity to enhance their skills of historical analysis, writing and oral communication through close engagement with an important historical event or issue. The Workshop is recommended for students planning to take 4000-level seminars, as well as students considering an application to graduate programs or professional schools. Please consult the History Department Handbook, Chair or web page for upcoming Workshop topics. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Race and Racism in Modern Hist
HIST.3643.A
Gebrekidan, FikruT TH01:00PM-02:20PM
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[1. World]Differences in skin color and physical characteristics took on a new significance in modern times. The newly invented concept of race classified human beings into several distinct categories with corresponding intellectual and behavioral traits. Race and Racism in Modern History studies the evolution of race thinking during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, as well as the extent to which such thoughts have since shaped the trajectory of world history.

United States:Since 1945
HIST.3743.A
Cross, BradleyT TH01:00PM-02:20PM
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[7. State, Nation, and Locality (The Americas)]This course examines the changing place in the world of the United States, the superpower of the 20th century, and analyses its character as a society. The course surveys political, social, and cultural trends from the role of the US in the 1940s as a military and economic colossus to its decline in the present postmodern, post-industrial world. It deals with such topics as the Cold War, Civil Rights, Vietnam, women's liberation, suburban life, consumerism, the corporations and unions, popular culture, the 1960s counter culture, and the Internet. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in History.

Urban North America
HIST.3773.A
Cross, BradleyT TH10:00AM-11:20AM
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[4. Regions (The Americas)]Addresses developments within and among North American cities and explores changes in the conception of cities in North American thought and culture. We will study the lives of urban dwellers and chart shifts in the way people organized their lives in cities. Major themes for this course include the changing physical structure and form of cities over time, processes of urbanization and suburbanization, city planing and reform movements, the economics of cities, urban institutions, urban populations, and city politics. In our investigation of Urban North America, we will ask: does the border make a difference?

Food in World History
HIST.4026.A1
Torrie, JuliaT02:30PM-05:20PM
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[1. World]Food keeps us alive, serves as a marker of social status, a stimulator of exploration and trade, and a cause of conflict and war. This seminar is about the history of food production, consumption and culture world-wide. Participants explore the roles food plays in human soci- eties, the social and cultural meanings of food and the ways foods travel from place to place. Equally, we consider food's presence, its absence and the impact of man-made and natural disasters on eating habits and food supplies. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Peoples History of Korea
HIST.4196.A1
Walhain, LucTH02:30PM-05:20PM
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[8. State, Nation, and Locality (Asia)] This seminar proposes an in-depth study of the modern history of Korea from the perspective of its least acknowledged, yet determinant, agent: the people. It examines major social movements which shaped Korean history and democratisation, e.g. the college student and labour movements. It also addresses Korea's geopolitical predicament from the viewpoint of some of its victims, such as the Korean sex slaves under Japanese colonial rule and Korea's political and economic prisoners of the Cold War. Prerequisite: HIST 1006 OR HIST 1013 & HIST 1023, OR permission of the instructor.

Winter Semester 2018

CourseInstrDaysTime
World History
HIST.1006.A2
Cross, BradleyM W F11:30AM-12:20PM
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[1. World]This course provides an overview of world history, from earliest times to the present. Major themes include human relationships with the environment, cultural exchanges between peoples, and the interconnectedness of the human experience. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1013 or HIST 1023.

World History
HIST.1006.B2
Walhain, LucM W F10:30AM-11:20AM
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[1. World]This course provides an overview of world history, from earliest times to the present. Major themes include human relationships with the environment, cultural exchanges between peoples, and the interconnectedness of the human experience. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1013 or HIST 1023.

World History II
HIST.1023.A
Watt, CareyT TH11:30AM-12:50PM
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[1. World] This 3-credit course is part of the world history survey. It offers an overview of world history events, issues, themes and approaches from roughly 1400 of the Common Era (CE) to the present. It will cover topics such as the emergence of long-distance exploration, cross-cultural interaction, the early modern and modern worlds, the Columbian Exchange, industrialization, modern imperialism, world wars, networks and globalization from circa 1400 onward. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1006. Students may take HIST 1023 before HIST 1013.

Exploring History
HIST.2003.B
Torrie, JuliaT TH10:00AM-11:20AM
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[10. Special]This mandatory course for History Majors and Honours students provides an introduction to the discipline of History. The course examines a variety of historiographical and method- ological approaches to History, as well as the history of History. It encourages students to re-examine their assumptions about History, but it will also help students develop their basic historical research and writing skills. Exploring History provides a foundation for upper-year History courses and students are strongly encouraged to take it before their third year. Prerequisite: At least 6 credit hours in History courses at St. Thomas University.

Early Modern Europe
HIST.2033.A
Mullin, JanetT TH11:30AM-12:50PM
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[6. Regions (Europe)]This course provides an introduction to early modern European history from the end of the so-called Middle Ages to the era of the French Revolution (more or less the 15th to the 18th centuries). Students will study social, cultural, political, economic and other develop- ments in order to better understand how societies we recognize today evolved from the rather different world of the late Middle Ages. The course traces themes and topics such as religious belief, absolutist politics, interactions between majorities and minorities, the changing status of women, and Europe's place in an increasingly global setting.

Modern Africa
HIST.2143.A
Gebrekidan, FikruT TH10:00AM-11:20AM
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[2. Regions (Africa)]Modern Africa surveys the history of Africa from the nineteenth century to the present. The course focuses on three major topics: the scramble for Africa and the partition, European colonial rules, and the assessment of the post-independence era. Subtopics include missionaries and explorers, occupation and forms of resistance, settler colonies versus non-settler colonies, nationals and war for independence, post-independence successes and challenges, the Cold War and the War on Terror, and globalization and the fading significance of the nation state. The objectives for this course are to challenge stereotypic notions about contemporary Africa, to contribute to students' understanding of Africa's place in the modern world, and to introduce students to some of the major historiographical debates on modern African history.

History of the Middle Ages
HIST.2206.A2
Mullin, JanetT TH04:00PM-05:20PM
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[6. Regions (Europe)]A survey of the imagined historical period between the fall of the classical Roman/Persian Empires and the emergence of an early modern state system. This course will range widely in its coverage, including glimpses of experience in parts of Africa and Asia as well as Europe. Special emphasis will be placed on social history and the use of primary sources to probe beyond simplified political narratives.

Latin America:Colonial Period
HIST.2613.A
Staff, M W02:30PM-03:50PM
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[4. Regions (The Americas)]This course surveys three centuries of Latin American history from first contacts between the Spanish and Native American civilizations to Latin American revolutions for Independence. Major themes include various types of relations between the founding peoples and the development of colonial social, political, economic, and religious institutions.

Historical Roots of Cont.Can
HIST.2913.A
Huskins, BonnieM W04:00PM-05:20PM
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[7. State, Nation, and Locality (The Americas)]This course examines the historical roots of many of the key issues in contemporary Canadian society. In addition to providing students with a narrative framework of Canadian history since the mid-19th century, the course will emphasize the historical dimensions of many of the most controversial issues facing Canada today, such as Quebec separatism, Aboriginal Land Claims, Western Alienation, Canada-US relations, etc. Students who have taken HIST 2806 or HIST 2823 are excluded from this course.

Disability in History
HIST.3053.A
Gebrekidan, FikruT TH01:00PM-02:20PM
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[1. World]This course treats disability as a historical subject. It explores questions such as what it means to be disabled in various times and places, how people with disability lived their lives, how society at large conceptualized differences in physical ability and mental capacity, when and how disability intersected with other identity constructs, and the roles myth and religion played in all this.

Making a Living in the USA
HIST.3713.A
Huskins, BonnieT TH01:00PM-02:20PM
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[7. State, Nation, and Locality (The Americas)] Making a Living in the United States examines the daily struggles of Americans to earn their daily bread over the last couple of centuries. This course will use such themes as work and workplaces, labour and capital relations, as well as the roles of gender, race, class, ethnicity and region in shaping how people made a living in the USA. There are no prerequisites for this course, however 3 credit hours in history is recommended.

Film and History
HIST.3783.A
Cross, BradleyW02:30PM-05:20PM
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[1. World]Explores the relationship between film and history, paying close attention to film as an historical artifact and film as a means of historical interpretation. In studying films produced primarily in North America, Latin America, and Europe, students in this course will be asked to develop a vocabulary of film, and to try to analyse the meaning and significance of film, both as artifact and interpretation. Writing will require that students make their own arguments about how we should understand the complicated relationship between visual media and history.

Sp.Top. Historian As Activist
HIST.3993.A
Gebrekidan, FikruW F09:00AM-10:20AM
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[10. Special] William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (1868-1963) embodied the consummate public intellectual of his time: educator, prolific author, and internationalist. His exemplary civil rights career, ranging in scope from his writings on anti-Semitism to his support for women's suffrage and his role in founding the NAACP, serves as a window into early and mid-twentieth-century social movements. Through the catalytic role of Du Bois as a leading critic of global injustice, Historian as Social Activist studies the powerful role of public intellectuals on social transformation. Du Bois's own scholarly publications, newspaper editorials, as well as his vast international correspondence, provide the materials on which students will base term paper research and periodic assignments.

Food in World History
HIST.4026.A2
Torrie, JuliaT02:30PM-05:20PM
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[1. World]Food keeps us alive, serves as a marker of social status, a stimulator of exploration and trade, and a cause of conflict and war. This seminar is about the history of food production, consumption and culture world-wide. Participants explore the roles food plays in human soci- eties, the social and cultural meanings of food and the ways foods travel from place to place. Equally, we consider food's presence, its absence and the impact of man-made and natural disasters on eating habits and food supplies. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Peoples History of Korea
HIST.4196.A2
Walhain, LucTH02:30PM-05:20PM
Show/Hide Detail

[8. State, Nation, and Locality (Asia)] This seminar proposes an in-depth study of the modern history of Korea from the perspective of its least acknowledged, yet determinant, agent: the people. It examines major social movements which shaped Korean history and democratisation, e.g. the college student and labour movements. It also addresses Korea's geopolitical predicament from the viewpoint of some of its victims, such as the Korean sex slaves under Japanese colonial rule and Korea's political and economic prisoners of the Cold War. Prerequisite: HIST 1006 OR HIST 1013 & HIST 1023, OR permission of the instructor.

Last Published: Sat Dec 16 06:05:01 2017