History

Fall Semester 2018

CourseInstrDaysTime
World History
HIST.1006.A1
Cross, BradleyT TH10:00AM-11:20AM
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[1. World]This course provides an overview of world history, from earliest times to the present. Major themes include human relationships with the environment, cultural exchanges between peoples, and the interconnectedness of the human experience. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1013 or HIST 1023.

World History to 1400
HIST.1013.A
Robert, KarenM W F11:30AM-12:20PM
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[1. World] This 3-credit course is half of the world history survey. It gives an overview of world history events, issues, themes and approaches to about 1400 of the Common Era (CE). It covers topics such as the origins of the universe (the Big Bang & Cosmic History), Paleolithic societies, the transition to agricultural societies, the rise of major states, empires and cultural traditions, the Silk Roads, and networks of cross-cultural interaction. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1006.

World History to 1400
HIST.1013.B
Watt, CareyM W F01:30PM-02:20PM
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[1. World] This 3-credit course is half of the world history survey. It gives an overview of world history events, issues, themes and approaches to about 1400 of the Common Era (CE). It covers topics such as the origins of the universe (the Big Bang & Cosmic History), Paleolithic societies, the transition to agricultural societies, the rise of major states, empires and cultural traditions, the Silk Roads, and networks of cross-cultural interaction. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1006.

Exploring History
HIST.2003.A
Torrie, JuliaT TH02:30PM-03:50PM
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[Special] This mandatory course for History Majors and Honours students provides an introduction to the discipline of History. The course examines a variety of historiographical and method- ological approaches to History, as well as the history of History. It encourages students to re-examine their assumptions about History, but it will also help students develop their basic historical research and writing skills. Exploring History provides a foundation for upper-year History courses and students are strongly encouraged to take it before their third year. Prerequisite: At least 6 credit hours in History courses at St. Thomas University.

Early Modern Europe
HIST.2033.A
Vose, RobinT TH08:30AM-09:50AM
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[6. Regions (Europe)]This course provides an introduction to early modern European history from the end of the so-called Middle Ages to the era of the French Revolution (more or less the 15th to the 18th centuries). Students will study social, cultural, political, economic and other developments in order to better understand how the societies we recognize today evolved from the rather different world of the late Middle Ages. The course traces themes and topics such as religious belief, absolutist politics, interactions between majorities and minorities, the changing status of women, and Europe's place in an increasingly global setting.

Spec. Top: Food in World Hist
HIST.2123.A
Torrie, JuliaW F09:00AM-10:20AM
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[1. World] This course explores how food was made, consumed and understood in the past. What were the social and cultural meanings of food and eating in human societies? How did foods travel from place to place? What impacts did man-made and natural disasters have on eating habits and food supplies, and how did the presence and absence of food influence behaviour? This course connects local and global interactions, past events and the present day through food.

History of the Middle Ages
HIST.2206.A1
Mullin, JanetM W F12:30PM-01:20PM
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[6. Regions (Europe)]A survey of the imagined historical period between the fall of the classical Roman and Persian Empires and the emergence of an early modern state system. This course will range widely in its coverage, including glimpses of experience in parts of Africa and Asia as well as Europe. Special emphasis will be placed on social history and the use of primary sources to probe beyond simplified political narratives.

History of the Islamic World
HIST.2553.A
Vose, RobinT TH11:30AM-12:50PM
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[1. World]This course provides a basic introduction to Islamic societies in their formative centuries. We will explore how the Muslim umma first emerged, developed and ultimately established itself as a unifying yet far from monolithic ideal, linking different peoples across the globe. Our focus will be on comprehension of historical experiences and relations between peoples rather than on detailed analysis of religious beliefs.

Latin America:Colonial Period
HIST.2613.A
Robert, KarenM W02:30PM-03:50PM
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[4. Regions (The Americas)]This course surveys three centuries of Latin American history from first contacts between the Spanish and Native American civilizations to Latin American revolutions for Independence. Major themes include various types of relations between the founding peoples and the development of colonial social, political, economic, and religious institutions.

US Hist: Reconstr. to 21st C.
HIST.2743.A
Cross, BradleyT TH01:00PM-02:20PM
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[7. State, Nation, and Locality (The Americas)]The continuation of the introductory survey HIST 2733. This course explores and examines some major developments in the United States, from the conclusion of the Civil War up to the present. Major issues include the legacy of the end of slavery in the United States, the expanded economic and military role of the US in the world, the emergence of transforming social movements, the changing role of the state, and American popular culture.

Hist. Roots of Contemp.Canada
HIST.2913.A
Huskins, BonnieT TH04:00PM-05:20PM
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[7. State, Nation, and Locality (The Americas)]This course examines the historical roots of many of the key issues in contemporary Canadian society. In addition to providing students with a narrative framework of Canadian history since the mid-19th century, the course will emphasize the historical dimensions of many of the most controversial issues facing Canada today, such as Quebec separatism, Aboriginal Land Claims, Western Alienation, Canada-US relations, etc. Students who have taken HIST 2806 or HIST 2823 are excluded from this course.

Germany:1871-1945
HIST.3363.A
Torrie, JuliaT TH11:30AM-12:50PM
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[9. State, Nation, and Locality (Europe)]In 1871, the newly-unified Germany looked forward to a future that seemed to promise greatness. By 1945, after two world wars, the country was in ruins. How did this come about? In this course, students study social, cultural, political and economic developments in order to understand better Germany's complex history from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century.

Gender & Power in Lat American
HIST.3613.A
Robert, KarenT TH04:00PM-05:20PM
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[4. Regions (The Americas)]Why did the Cuban revolution set out to create a 'new man'? How did Eva PerĂ³n become the world's most powerful first lady? Why have women led most human rights movements in Latin America? These are some of the questions to be explored in this course which examines historical relationships between men and women and ideas about masculinity and femininity in Latin America.

Genocide in 20 Cent. Hist.
HIST.3943.A
Gebrekidan, FikruT TH11:30AM-12:50PM
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[1. World]The twentieth century remains the most violent period in history. Its global ramifications notwithstanding, genocide research continues to focus on the experience of particular nations and nationalities. By juxtaposing and examining such disjointed narratives across continents, this course hopes to bolster a critical understanding of what is no doubt the crudest aspect of human nature.

Research Sem. in Material Hist
HIST.4106.A1
Cross, BradleyW02:30PM-05:20PM
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[1. World] This research seminar course examines the practices and products of doing history through things in a comparative and global perspective. Until recently, historians have relied heavily on written documents for evidence, and this course challenges that approach. This course will consider some of the methods used to write history using physical things, as well as the varied literature produced by the study of material culture. Participants will produce a historical research paper based on significant use of material objects.

Winter Semester 2019

CourseInstrDaysTime
World History
HIST.1006.A2
Cross, BradleyT TH10:00AM-11:20AM
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[1. World]This course provides an overview of world history, from earliest times to the present. Major themes include human relationships with the environment, cultural exchanges between peoples, and the interconnectedness of the human experience. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1013 or HIST 1023.

World History Since 1400
HIST.1023.A
Watt, CareyM W F01:30PM-02:20PM
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[1. World] This 3-credit course is part of the world history survey. It offers an overview of world history events, issues, themes and approaches from roughly 1400 of the Common Era (CE) to the present. It will cover topics such as the emergence of long-distance exploration, cross-cultural interaction, the early modern and modern worlds, the Columbian Exchange, industrialization, modern imperialism, world wars, networks and globalization from circa 1400 onward. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1006. Students may take HIST 1023 before HIST 1013.

World History Since 1400
HIST.1023.B
Torrie, JuliaT TH02:30PM-03:50PM
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[1. World] This 3-credit course is part of the world history survey. It offers an overview of world history events, issues, themes and approaches from roughly 1400 of the Common Era (CE) to the present. It will cover topics such as the emergence of long-distance exploration, cross-cultural interaction, the early modern and modern worlds, the Columbian Exchange, industrialization, modern imperialism, world wars, networks and globalization from circa 1400 onward. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1006. Students may take HIST 1023 before HIST 1013.

Exploring History
HIST.2003.B
Gebrekidan, FikruW F09:00AM-10:20AM
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[Special] This mandatory course for History Majors and Honours students provides an introduction to the discipline of History. The course examines a variety of historiographical and method- ological approaches to History, as well as the history of History. It encourages students to re-examine their assumptions about History, but it will also help students develop their basic historical research and writing skills. Exploring History provides a foundation for upper-year History courses and students are strongly encouraged to take it before their third year. Prerequisite: At least 6 credit hours in History courses at St. Thomas University.

War & Famine in Horn of Africa
HIST.2113.A
Gebrekidan, FikruT TH10:00AM-11:20AM
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[2. Regions (Africa)]This is a course on the history of Northeastern Africa, with a focus on Ethiopia, the most populous country in the region. Northeastern Africa, commonly known as the Horn of Africa, consists of Somalia, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Sudan. Designed with history and non- history Majors in mind, the course will explore major landmark events in the history of this region from antiquity to the present.

History of Modern India
HIST.2183.A
Watt, CareyT TH01:00PM-02:20PM
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[8. State, Nation, and Locality (Asia)]The course explores the history of the Indian subcontinent from c. 1500 onward. It considers the Mughals, the 18th-century successor states, British colonialism, Indian nationalism and postcolonial India to the present day.

History of the Middle Ages
HIST.2206.A2
Mullin, JanetM W F12:30PM-01:20PM
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[6. Regions (Europe)]A survey of the imagined historical period between the fall of the classical Roman and Persian Empires and the emergence of an early modern state system. This course will range widely in its coverage, including glimpses of experience in parts of Africa and Asia as well as Europe. Special emphasis will be placed on social history and the use of primary sources to probe beyond simplified political narratives.

Comp. Hist. of North America
HIST.2433.A
Huskins, BonnieT TH04:00PM-05:20PM
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[4. Regions (The Americas)]This course is designed to acquaint students with broad developments in the history of North America. In the course of studying the North American continent, we will examine the experiences of contact between indigenous and immigrant cultures; the transmission of European ideas and institutions to the American hemisphere; the influence of the Atlantic system of commerce on regional economies; and the struggles of various peoples in the Americas to define themselves and others. Students will be asked to draw connections between major events and occurrences, and to find coherence in different events.

Gender in Early Modern Europe
HIST.3033.A
Staff, T TH08:30AM-09:50AM
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[6. Regions (Europe)] Europe's early modern period (c. 1450-1800) was a time of political tumult, religious conflict, and seismic shifts in centuries-old institutions. The resulting social changes were profound; new roles emerged for men and women as new questions were asked and new norms evolved. This course takes a thematic approach to the changing lives of men and women, examining the role of gender in both the major events and the everyday realities of the period.

The Briti. Atlan. World
HIST.3203.A
Huskins, BonnieM W04:00PM-05:20PM
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[3. Regions (Oceans)]This course explores the social, political, and economic parameters of the Atlantic World from roughly 1500 to 1800. The course centres on the British experience of the Atlantic through a comparative and trans-national approach. Particular attention will be drawn to the role of Atlantic Canada and its connection to the larger Atlantic World.

The Medieval Church
HIST.3223.A
Vdovyna, OlenaM W F10:30AM-11:20AM
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[6. Regions (Europe)]This course deals with the history of the Church from the time of Gregory the Great in the sixth century to the end of the fifteenth century. For the most part we will deal with the Western Church, although there will be some treatment of the relations that existed with the East. The theme that will run throughout the course is that of the interaction between the Church and the society of this period. Among the topics that will be covered will be the Merovingian and Carolingian Church and the role of such leaders as Charlemagne, the Gregorian Reform Movement and the clash with the Emperor, the development and contribution to medieval society, the emergence of the pilgrimage and the crusade, the religious unrest of the later Middle Ages, and the growth of the medieval papacy.

The Germanies Since 1945
HIST.3373.A
Torrie, JuliaT TH11:30AM-12:50PM
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[9. State, Nation, and Locality (Europe)]The defeat of Nazi Germany and the falling-out of the victors led to the enforced division of Germany. By 1949, two separate German states had come into existence: the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) and the German Democratic Republic (East Germany). This course examines the history of Germany from the end of the Second World War to the present.

Women & Gender in Mod. Canada
HIST.3883.A
Gidney, CatherineW F09:00AM-10:20AM
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[7. State, Nation, and Locality (The Americas)] This discussion-based course examines gender and women's history in Canada from c. 1850 to c. 1980. It addresses traditional historical topics in the field (industrialization, the Great Depression, World War Two, etc.) as well as emerging topics such as sport, consumerism, and student culture. Our approach will be both chronological and thematic. Prerequisite: HIST 2913 or permission of the instructor.

Topic:Piracy in Pre-Mod World
HIST.3983.A
Huskins, BonnieT TH02:30PM-03:50PM
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[1. World]This course will explore specific topics in pre-modern world history. For information regarding course content students should contact the Chair of the History Department. Pre-requisite: 9 credit hours in History, or permission of the instructor.

Research Sem. in Material Hist
HIST.4106.A2
Cross, BradleyW02:30PM-05:20PM
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[1. World] This research seminar course examines the practices and products of doing history through things in a comparative and global perspective. Until recently, historians have relied heavily on written documents for evidence, and this course challenges that approach. This course will consider some of the methods used to write history using physical things, as well as the varied literature produced by the study of material culture. Participants will produce a historical research paper based on significant use of material objects.

Last Published: Sat Oct 20 06:15:08 2018