Human Rights

Courses

Please note that not every course listed is offered each year and that students should consult the following sources for current course offerings:

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

HMRT-1006. Introduction to Human Rights

This course will introduce students to the study of human rights by investigating the question what is a human right? The course will proceed primarily through a number of examples and case studies. Students will also be given an overview of the basic instruments, institutions, and ideas relevant to human rights.

HMRT-2013. Research Methods

The purpose of this course is to give students an introduction to research methods used in the study of human rights. The course will include methods of data collection as well as analysis of data. The course will begin with a general introduction to the aims and methods of research projects. Students in this course will do a research project in human rights under the supervision of the instructor. Students will be expected to present periodic reports on the status of their work.

HMRT-2023. Human Rights and Literature

This course will explore various human rights questions through an examination of relevant legal documents paired with literary works from a variety of genres (from drama to memoir) that address each issue. The course is intended to give students an understanding of some of the most pressing human rights issues of the past and today, ranging from slavery to economic inequalities.

HMRT-2033. Human Rights in Theory and Practice

This course critically analyzes different theories concerning the practice of human rights as a framework for social justice. A variety of texts from thinkers such as Rawls, Grant, Locke, Marx, DuBois, and De Tocqueville will be used to analyze theories of justice, liberty, equality, solidarity, and legal certainty. This course will also examine the critiques of rights and the limitations of the international human rights movement and framework.

HMRT-2043. Non-Western Perspectives on Human Rights

This course will explore philosophic and religious sources outside the Western canon, on which Human Rights discourse can be and has been based. The culture spheres of interest will be the Middle East, Asia, and Africa. This course critically analyzes non-western theories concerning the practice of human rights as a framework for social justice. The course seeks to place Western Human Rights discourse in a global context by drawing attention to ways in which non-Western cultures have addressed questions of individual versus group or state rights, the metaphysical and political sources of rights, and the possibility of universal human dignity.

HMRT-3013. Discrimination and the Law in Canada

This course will focus on domestic human rights codes and human rights commissions. Special attention will be given to the New Brunswick Human Rights Code and the New Brunswick Human Rights Commission.

HMRT-3033. Philosophy of Human Rights

This course will introduce students to philosophical questions concerning the foundations of human rights. What are human rights based on? What makes something a human right? Are human rights universally and permanently valid or is the notion of human rights merely a construct of modern Western culture? The course will familiarize students with alternative theoretical answers to these and other related questions.

HMRT-3063. Genocide, War Crimes, and Crimes Against Humanity

This course will examine strategies to prevent, investigate and punish genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Students will explore the protection of victims and their fundamental rights in emergency situations, the rights and duties of relevant stakeholders, and the role of international law in addressing grievous human rights violations.

HMRT-3073. Human Rights Internship

This course will provide students with exposure to the practice of human rights by completing a supervised internship with a local nongovernmental organization. Students will be required to complete a detailed exit report and research paper that encourages them to reflect on the relationship between that experience and their formal human rights studies.

HMRT-3113. The Rights Revolution in Canada

This course will examine the impact of the Charter on rights and freedoms in Canada. After an introductory discussion of the Bill of Rights and the development of the Charter, instruction will focus on a large number of Supreme Court decisions interpreting the meaning of the Charter's provisions.

HMRT-3123. International Human Rights

This course explicates the principal international and regional systems in place for the protection and promotion of human rights, including the Inter-American, European, African, and United Nations systems. Students will study the most important human rights instruments, such as the International Bill of Rights, the European Convention on Human Rights, and the American Convention on Human Rights.

HMRT-3133. Activism and Social Justice

This course will identify and explore the operations of the main non-governmental organizations at the international and domestic levels in the field of human rights. Theoretical consideration shall be given to the role of these organizations in the practice of freedom. The practical work of various human rights groups will be considered. Students will be expected to participate in the work of a given human rights group during the course.

HMRT-3203. Human Rights Advocacy Through Social Media

This course explores how the rise of social media has both advanced and hindered the protection of human rights by examining how social media provides a platform for instantaneous global information-sharing, rendering it increasingly difficult for state or business interests to shield human rights abuses from public scrutiny. Topics will be examined through a number of case studies Prerequisites. There are no prerequisites for this course.

HMRT-3503. Moot Court

Moot court cultivates advanced analytical skills while developing leadership qualities in students with an interest in human rights. Students learn how to develop and deliver oral legal arguments by competing in a Supreme Court simulation where they answer questions from a panel of judges. Students focus on Supreme Court precedent surrounding two different issues each year. Students are required to have permission of instructor to register for the course. No other prerequisites are required.

HMRT-3513. Moot Court II

Moot court cultivates advanced analytical skills while developing leadership qualities in students with an interest in human rights. Students learn how to develop and deliver oral legal arguments by competing in a Supreme Court simulation where they answer questions from a panel of judges. Students focus on Supreme Court precedent surrounding two different issues each year. Students are required to have permission of instructor to register for the course. No other prerequisites are required.

HMRT-3523. Moot Court III

Moot court cultivates advanced analytical skills while developing leadership qualities in students with an interest in human rights. Students learn how to develop and deliver oral legal arguments by competing in a Supreme Court simulation where they answer questions from a panel of judges. Students focus on Supreme Court precedent surrounding two different issues each year. Students are required to have permission of instructor to register for the course. No other prerequisites are required.

HMRT-3543. Human Rights and Foreign Policy

This course considers human rights in international relations and foreign policy from the point of view of constraints on sovereignty. With background from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries up to WWII, it concentrates on the promotion and protection of human rights in the post-war period. Topics covered include: the UN system of human rights and the international and domestic politics of human rights as evidenced in foreign policy, Canadian in particular.

HMRT-3603. Thesis Proposal

The purpose of this course is to guide students interested in writing an honours thesis through their initial research process. Students will develop a thesis statement, examine their methodology, conduct a literature review and write a substantial annotated bibliography. Classes will be held throughout the term to assess progress towards the completion of the proposal. A completed thesis proposal is required before moving on in the honours program.

HMRT-3633. Gender Expression, Sexual Orientation, and Human Rights (WS/GS)

This course explores the socially constructed customs and structures of society that enables the legal regulation of gender identity and human sexuality by exploring the history, policies and norms that shapes government action. Basic theories of gender and sexuality studies will be explored before critically examining the same theories in practice through case studies. This course will also explore a variety of other identity issues such as race, age, disability, and class intertwine with gender and sexuality identities. We will also examine how experiences and identities shape the ways in which people resist inequality and lobby for change. This course will enable students to critically evaluate legislative and judicial responses to human sexuality and gender expression.

HMRT-3803. Human Rights of the Child

This course examines the legal human rights structures in Canada and internationally, as they apply to children and adolescents in unique and rapidly evolving ways. The primary focus is on domestic human rights legislation under provincial and federal human rights Acts. Various legal regimes, both local and international, related to immigration/refugee law, privacy law, health law, criminal law, education law, Aboriginal law, child welfare law, and other areas will be surveyed.

HMRT-3903. Corporate Social Responsibility

This course looks at the social responsibility of corporations. Students will explore equitable employment practices, the right to a healthy work environment, equal pay for equal work, protection from discrimination, harassment, and exploitation, and the right to form and join trade unions. This course explores strategies for preventing such violations, the extent to which businesses are legally obligated to respect human rights, and the type of recourse and remedies available when rights are violated.

HMRT-4013. Capstone Seminar

This course will consist of an in-depth investigation of one or more human rights problems. The specific topic will change from year to year. Students will be expected to examine the issue(s) in light of their knowledge of the basic instruments, institutions, and ideas relevant to human rights as well as their understanding of the fundamental questions of value that surround contemporary social issues. The course is normally reserved for students in their final year of the human rights Major.

HMRT-4023. Independent Study

Students may undertake studies under the direction of a member or members of the programme with the permission of the Director. The course is limited to students with a proven academic record.

HMRT-4043. Special Topics in Human Rights

The content of this course changes from year to year reflecting the strengths of faculty or the scholar occupying the Chair in Canadian Citizenship and Human Rights.

HMRT-4053. Human Rights Leadership

This course will provide students with exposure to the practice of human rights, encouraging them to reflect on the relationship between that experience and their formal human rights studies. Students must obtain approval from the Director of the Human Rights Programme for their participation in this course.

HMRT-4063. Honours Thesis

This course is the written component of the honours program and is an extended research paper on a topic written under the supervision of a thesis director. Students must have completed HMRT 3603, Thesis Proposal, with a minimum grade of B to take HMRT 4063. Upon completion, the thesis is defended in front of the student's thesis committee as well as invited member of the human rights faculty.

HMRT-5503. Teaching for and About Human Rights

This course is offered during the human rights summer institute designed for pre-service teachers, practicing teachers, and professionals in related fields. The course introduces participants to the various rights, instruments, and issues relevant to the classroom and provides opportunities for teachers and others to increase their knowledge base in the human rights field.

Last Published: Fri Dec 15 06:05:01 2017