Native Studies

Fall Semester 2018

CourseInstrDaysTime
Intro to Native Studies
NATI.1006.A1
Landry, MarkT06:30PM-09:30PM
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of Native Studies. Its purpose is to increase the student's understanding and sensitivity towards the past and present experience of Native peoples. Using both oral and written records, the course will examine pre-contact history and culture, the influences of colonialism in the post-contact era, and contemporary issues.

Intro to Native Studies
NATI.1006.Y1
Simon, NatashaM W F09:00AM-10:00AM
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of Native Studies. Its purpose is to increase the student's understanding and sensitivity towards the past and present experience of Native peoples. Using both oral and written records, the course will examine pre-contact history and culture, the influences of colonialism in the post-contact era, and contemporary issues.

Nat. People & Colonial Exper.
NATI.3603.A
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH01:00PM-02:20PM
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This course will look at colonialism as a strategy of imperialism and as a model for understanding North American Native history. Different types of colonialism will be explored, i.e. classic, internal, and neocolonialism, and an emphasis will be placed on the history and continuing impact of colonialism on Indigenous peoples and cultures of North America. The course will also analyze Christian missions, the fur trade, and colonial government policies, as well as exploitation, racism, war, indoctrination, genocide, and cultural appropriation as manifestations of colonialism. Responses to colonialism, including resistance and decolonization, will also be considered. Prerequisite: NATI 1006.

Native Resistance & Liberation
NATI.3613.A
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH02:30PM-03:50PM
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Focuses on the many historical and contemporary forms of Native resistance to colonization, including violent and non-violent resistance, revitalization movements, and self-determination. Explores liberation theory and its roots in colonial oppression. Analyzes historical and contemporary resistance movements such as the Ghost Dance Movement, the Riel Rebellion, the fish-ins, the confrontations at Wounded Knee and Oka, and the movement for decolonization through self-determination. Prerequisite: NATI 3603 or by special permission of the instructor.

Suicide and Indigenous Peoples
NATI.3843.A
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH04:00PM-05:20PM
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Suicide is, and has been for nobody knows how long, rampant in indigenous populations in Canada. Despite well-publicized projects targeting specific communities, none of the interventions have been able to demonstrate any positive effect; if anything, the problem continues to worsen. We examine critically the field of Suicidology as it applies to the Native Peoples of Canada and suggest reasons why efforts to prevent suicide have not paid off. We also explore different kinds of interventions that may be more successful.

Native People & The Law I
NATI.3903.A
Landry, MarkW06:30PM-09:20PM
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The Evolution of the Indian Act - a legal history of the legal-political relationship between Native peoples and Europeans from early contact times to the British North America Act. An analysis of the Indian Act as a document of protection/assimilation in Canadian Government policy.

Winter Semester 2019

CourseInstrDaysTime
Intro to Native Studies
NATI.1006.A2
Landry, MarkT06:30PM-09:20PM
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of Native Studies. Its purpose is to increase the student's understanding and sensitivity towards the past and present experience of Native peoples. Using both oral and written records, the course will examine pre-contact history and culture, the influences of colonialism in the post-contact era, and contemporary issues.

Intro to Native Studies
NATI.1006.Y2
Simon, NatashaM W F09:00AM-10:00AM
Show/Hide Detail

A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of Native Studies. Its purpose is to increase the student's understanding and sensitivity towards the past and present experience of Native peoples. Using both oral and written records, the course will examine pre-contact history and culture, the influences of colonialism in the post-contact era, and contemporary issues.

Native Educ & Colonization
NATI.3623.A
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH01:00PM-02:20PM
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This course will examine traditional forms and philosophies of education in Native societies, and the changes that have occurred since contact and colonization. It will also examine the formal education of Natives by the immigrant society as indoctrination for civilization and assimilation. It will look closely at residential and day schools in Canada and the United States and the effect they have had on contemporary Native societies and cultures. Special attention will be given to the relationship between education and cultural survival, and the importance for Native people to reclaim and control the education of their children. Prerequisite: NATI 3603 or permission of the instructor.

Alc. Drugs, and Indig. Peoples
NATI.3853.A
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH04:00PM-05:20PM
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This course provides an introduction to issues of alcohol and drug use/abuse in indigenous communities (concentrating on Canada for the most part, but including reference to such issues in other indigenous communities worldwide). Traditional uses of substances which alter consciousness are reviewed, as well as the role that the introduction of unfamiliar psychoactive substances played in European expansionism and colonialism. Modern models of addiction and programs for recovery are critically examined and placed within the context of creating a continuing marginalization of indigenous cultures by dominating ones.

Native Public Health
NATI.3863.A
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH02:30PM-03:50PM
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Health statistics show Native Peoples in Canada as public health disasters: high rates of diabetes, tuberculosis, cancer, suicide, AIDS, etc. are regularly reported. Standard accounts typically find a way of attributing the problems to Indians themselves (e.g., genetic explanations or lifestyle choices). We critically examine the methodologically-individualistic biases of standard accounts of Indian ill-heath and place Native public health issues in an historical and materialist framework instead. Alternative forms of interventions are also considered.

Aboriginal Rts: Land Question
NATI.3923.A
Landry, MarkW06:30PM-09:20PM
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This course will examine the concept of Aboriginal rights pertaining to land entitlement in Canada and the United States. It will include case studies focusing on the Maritimes, Quebec, MacKenzie Valley, British Columbia, Alaska, and Maine.

Last Published: Tue Oct 23 06:15:01 2018