Native Studies

Fall Semester 2017

CourseInstrDaysTime
Intro to Native Studies
NATI.1006.A1
Landry, MarkT07:00PM-09:50PM
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of Native Studies. Its purpose is to increase the student's understanding and sensitivity towards the past and present experience of Native peoples. Using both oral and written records, the course will examine pre-contact history and culture, the influences of colonialism in the post-contact era, and contemporary issues.

Research Strat. in Native Stud
NATI.2503.A
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH02:30PM-03:50PM
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Surveys various research strategies from Anthropology and Sociology and assesses their applicability to, and compatibility with, Native Studies. Considers special protocol and ethical questions in research on Native peoples. Prerequisite: NATI 1006 or by special permission of instructor.

Mi'kmaq History
NATI.3643.A
Landry, MarkW07:00PM-09:50PM
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This course will explore the cultural, social, and political past of the Mi'kmaq People through archaeological, oral, visual, and material documentation, as well as primary and secondary written sources. Particular emphasis will be placed on understanding the Mi'kmaq form of life and how it has been affected by colonization. Class will also study how the perspective of different writers influences what gets recorded and taught as history. An important theme of the course will be the relevance of the past to the present. Class will consist of lectures and discussions with occasional films and speakers. Prerequisite: NATI 1006, Introduction to Native Studies.

Indigen.Econ&The Idea Develop.
NATI.3703.A
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH05:30PM-06:50PM
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Examines indigenous economic cultures and the impact of western economic culture on traditional social organization and values. Looks closely at the fur trade, capitalism, industry, technology, and their effects on environment and indigenous cultures. Analyzes the development of dependency and the idea of economic development. Alternatives in which Native economic values provide the basis for viable economic endeavours will be considered.

Native Peoples and Racism
NATI.3823.A
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH04:00PM-05:20PM
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The indigenous peoples of Canada are often included as an afterthought in academic works on racism, which tend to focus on Black-White relations. However, rather than being marginal to understanding the issues of race and racism, the early encounters between European and Native Americans are central to its proper understanding. The issues which arose from Columbus' explorations remain as central to understanding modern racism as they were to the creation of racist ideology in the first place, and the treatment of indigenous peoples in Canada today is shown to be a direct intellectual descendent of the material need to deny the humanity of other human beings.

Winter Semester 2018

CourseInstrDaysTime
Intro to Native Studies
NATI.1006.A2
Landry, MarkT07:00PM-09:50PM
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of Native Studies. Its purpose is to increase the student's understanding and sensitivity towards the past and present experience of Native peoples. Using both oral and written records, the course will examine pre-contact history and culture, the influences of colonialism in the post-contact era, and contemporary issues.

Sci., Ethics & Native People
NATI.2303.A
Landry, MarkW07:00PM-09:50PM
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This course is designed to introduce students to ethical issues that arise between the sciences (both social and physical) and indigenous peoples. Anthropology, education, psychology, archaeology, medicine, biology, and other disciplines follow lines of inquiry that impact indigenous peoples, and their theories, methods, interpretations, and interests are examined in relation to ethical considerations. We emphasize the concerns and point of view of Native people. The course may include issues of exhumation and public display of skeletal remains and sacred objects, control over access to information, the political relevance of research and its role in land claims, the ethics of assessment and drawing conclusions about the nature of indigenous peoples, and other topics.

Native Philosophy
NATI.3203.A
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH02:30PM-03:50PM
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This course examines Native cosmologies (world views) and ways of thinking, feeling, and knowing as the foundation of indigenous spiritual, political, social, and economic systems. Defines the continuing existence and vitality of traditional Native philosophy and traces its influence on Western knowledge. Prerequisite: NATI 1006 or by permission of instructor.

Native Env. Ethics & Ecology
NATI.3223.A
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH04:00PM-05:20PM
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Examines traditional and contemporary environmental values and practices of Indigenous peoples in North America. Considers the impact of Western values, practices, and ecological theories on Indigenous peoples and their environments. Particular attention will be given to the ways in which traditional environmental ethics remain viable in contemporary societies.

Native Cult.Identity&Cult.Surv
NATI.3813.A
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH05:30PM-06:50PM
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Considers cultural identity and survival within the context of inequality (power, wealth and status). Focuses on the ways in which Native language, group solidarity and community offer cultural completeness, acting as barriers to assimilation. Historic and contemporary Native cultures are presented as dynamic and flexible. Prerequisite NATI 1006 or SOCI 1006.

Native People & The Law II
NATI.3913.A
Nicholas, GraydonM W04:00PM-05:20PM
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An analysis of court decisions affecting questions of the status of Native peoples, Aboriginal rights, family law, treaty rights, and social relations in Canada and the United States. Prerequisite: NATI 3903.

Last Published: Sun Dec 17 06:05:02 2017