Philosophy

Fall Semester 2018

CourseInstrDaysTime
Intro. to Philosophy I
PHIL.1013.A
Robinson, MatthewT TH10:00AM-11:20AM
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[1. Introductory]An introduction, through lecture, reading of original sources, and discussion, to the origins and development of western philosophy from its beginnings in ancient Greece through the Middle Ages. Authors read include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Thomas Aquinas. Themes: the nature of reality, the nature of human being and human knowledge; moral and political philosophy; the existence and nature of God.

Intro. to Philosophy I
PHIL.1013.B
Gilbert-Walsh, JamesT TH11:30AM-12:50PM
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[1. Introductory]An introduction, through lecture, reading of original sources, and discussion, to the origins and development of western philosophy from its beginnings in ancient Greece through the Middle Ages. Authors read include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Thomas Aquinas. Themes: the nature of reality, the nature of human being and human knowledge; moral and political philosophy; the existence and nature of God.

Intro. to Philosophy I
PHIL.1013.C
Ranger, Jean-PhilippeM W F10:30AM-11:20AM
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[1. Introductory]An introduction, through lecture, reading of original sources, and discussion, to the origins and development of western philosophy from its beginnings in ancient Greece through the Middle Ages. Authors read include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Thomas Aquinas. Themes: the nature of reality, the nature of human being and human knowledge; moral and political philosophy; the existence and nature of God.

Ethics of Sustainability
PHIL.2253.A
Robinson, MatthewM W02:30PM-03:50PM
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[3. Moral Philosophy] An historically-conscious analysis of various normative stances in environmental ethics integrated with a sustained consideration of how to apply this ethical theory to modern life. Topics may include deep and shallow ecology, biocentrism, eco-feminism, environmental justice, environmental virtue ethics, the ambiguous role of technology in the environmental crisis, the ethics of the green economy, the ethics of green public policy, a survey of various locally-employed environmental initiatives. Recommended preparation: PHIL 2213.

Seminar on Plato's Philosophy
PHIL.3503.A
Ranger, Jean-PhilippeT TH02:30PM-03:50PM
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[5. Themes and Authors] This seminar brings together two questions central to the study of Plato: What is philosophy? and what can it achieve? Through an analysis of primary sources and secondary literature, the seminar assesses various answers provided by Plato. Texts covered may include selections from the dialogues of definition (Apology, Euthyphro, Gorgias), from the metaphysical dialogues (Phaedo, Republic), and from the dialogues on language (Theaetetus, Parmenides, Sophist). Prerequisites: Any six (6) credit hours in the History of Philosophy (PHIL 2113, 2123, 2133, 2143, 2153, and 2163), or permission of the instructor.

Augustine
PHIL.3553.A
Robinson, MatthewT TH01:00PM-02:20PM
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[5. Themes and Authors]This course will involve a close reading of the major works of St. Augustine, among which will be The Confessions, The Trinity, and The City of God. Prerequisite: PHIL 1013 or permission of the instructor.

Phenomenology
PHIL.3583.A
Gilbert-Walsh, JamesT TH08:30AM-09:50AM
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[5. Themes and Authors]A lecture course introducing students to phenomenology, a late 19th century and early 20th century mode of philosophical inquiry that has played a major role in informing and shaping much contemporary philosophy. The primary focus of the course will be the work of Edmund Husserl (1859-1938), though other thinkers will likely be discussed. Prerequisite: Any two of PHIL 1013, 1023, 1033, 1043, 1053, 1063, or permission of the instructor.

Kierkegaard & Nietzsche
PHIL.3643.A
Gilbert-Walsh, JamesW F09:00AM-10:20AM
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[5. Themes and Authors]This course will engage and critically assess the views of the two leading figures in 19th century existentialism, Søren Kierkegaard and Friedrich Nietzsche. Prerequisites: Any two of PHIL 1013, 1023, 1033, 1043, 1053, 1063, or permission of the instructor.

Winter Semester 2019

CourseInstrDaysTime
Intro to Philosophy II
PHIL.1023.A
Robinson, MatthewT TH10:00AM-11:20AM
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[1. Introductory]A continuation of the survey of developments in western philosophy, through lecture, reading of original sources, and discussion, from the early modern period to contemporary discussion. Focus: rationalism, empiricism, idealism, and the reactions these provoked. This course has no prerequisite.

Intro to Philosophy II
PHIL.1023.B
Gilbert-Walsh, JamesT TH11:30AM-12:50PM
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[1. Introductory]A continuation of the survey of developments in western philosophy, through lecture, reading of original sources, and discussion, from the early modern period to contemporary discussion. Focus: rationalism, empiricism, idealism, and the reactions these provoked. This course has no prerequisite.

Intro to Philosophy II
PHIL.1023.C
Ranger, Jean-PhilippeM W F10:30AM-11:20AM
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[1. Introductory]A continuation of the survey of developments in western philosophy, through lecture, reading of original sources, and discussion, from the early modern period to contemporary discussion. Focus: rationalism, empiricism, idealism, and the reactions these provoked. This course has no prerequisite.

Free Will: An Intro. to Phil.
PHIL.1043.A
Stapleford, ScottT TH01:00PM-02:20PM
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[1. Introductory]This course is an introduction to philosophy focusing on the problem of free will. Students will be introduced to the current debate, but will also consider what the great minds of the past can tell us about the possibility or impossibility of acting freely. We will draw on both historical and contemporary sources, developing skills of philosophical analysis in connection with a single, hotly disputed topic. This course has no prerequisite.

Medieval Philosophy
PHIL.2143.A
Robinson, MatthewT TH01:00PM-02:20PM
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[2. History of Philosophy]A lecture course covering the Medieval philosophy of the 13th century (especially Thomas Aquinas), the collapse of the Thomistic synthesis in fourteenth century philosophy, and the beginning of the Modern outlook. Prerequisites: Any two of PHIL 1013, 1023, 1033, 1043, 1053, 1063, or permission of the instructor.

The Art of Living
PHIL.2263.A
Ranger, Jean-PhilippeM W F12:30PM-01:20PM
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[3. Moral Philosophy] Can Greek philosophers help us live a fulfilling life? This course examines a rich tradition known as therapy for the mind, that developed from Socrates to Hellenistic Philosophy. These thinkers argue that philosophy improves many facets of our lives and can help us become happy. What do they have to say about happiness, emotions, desires, love, and death? Can this advice be useful for us today? The course presupposes no background in philosophy. Prerequisites: none.

Minds and Brains
PHIL.2533.A
Stapleford, ScottM W02:30PM-03:50PM
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[5. Themes and Authors] What is a mind? Is the mind reducible to the brain? If not, how are they related? Various answers to these questions will be considered in the course. Topics will normally include: behaviourism, functionalism, dualism, identity theory, representational theory, consciousness, the intentional stance, eliminativism, property dualism, non-reductive physicalism. The course presupposes no background in philosophy and may be of interest to students in psychology and the life sciences, as well as philosophy. Prerequisites: none.

Analytic Philosophy: Theories
PHIL.3673.A
Stapleford, ScottT TH10:00AM-11:20AM
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[5. Themes and Authors]This course is meant to complement PHIL 3663, but it may be taken independently. It is a lecture course covering topics of current interest in Analytic Philosophy, a movement in, and a style of doing, philosophy that has been prominent in the English-speaking world since the beginning of the 20th century. Topics will vary and will normally be drawn from one or more of the following sub-disciplines: epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, philosophy of science. Prerequisites: Any two of PHIL 1013, 1023, 1033, 1043, 1053, 1063, or permission of the instructor.

Martin Heidegger
PHIL.3763.A
Gilbert-Walsh, JamesT TH08:30AM-09:50AM
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[5. Themes and Authors]In this course, we will engage in a close reading of selected works by Martin Heidegger. We will consider Heidegger's attempt to raise anew the urgent question of being; specifically, how his development of this question demands a radical assessment of many of our most dearly held assumptions about truth, human nature, knowledge and reality, freedom and responsibility, history and time. Pre-requisites: Either PHIL 3653 or PHIL 3583, or permission of the instructor

Last Published: Fri Jul 20 06:15:03 2018