Philosophy

Fall Semester 2017

CourseInstrDaysTime
Intro. to Philosophy I
PHIL.1013.A
Gilbert-Walsh, JamesT TH10:00AM-11:20AM
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[1. Introductory]An introduction, through lecture, reading of original sources, and discussion, to the origins and development of western philosophy from its beginnings in ancient Greece through the Middle Ages. Authors read include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Thomas Aquinas. Themes: the nature of reality, the nature of human being and human knowledge; moral and political philosophy; the existence and nature of God.

Intro. to Philosophy I
PHIL.1013.B
Ranger, Jean-PhilippeT TH11:30AM-12:50PM
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[1. Introductory]An introduction, through lecture, reading of original sources, and discussion, to the origins and development of western philosophy from its beginnings in ancient Greece through the Middle Ages. Authors read include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Thomas Aquinas. Themes: the nature of reality, the nature of human being and human knowledge; moral and political philosophy; the existence and nature of God.

Atheism: An Intro. to Phil.
PHIL.1033.A
Stapleford, ScottT TH01:00PM-02:20PM
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[1. Introductory]This course is an introduction to philosophy focusing on atheism. Students will be introduced to the current debate, but will also consider what the great minds of the past can tell us about the existence or non-existence of God. We will draw on both historical and contemporary sources, developing skills of philosophical analysis in connection with a single, hotly disputed topic. This course has no prerequisite.

Ancient Phil. I
PHIL.2113.A
Ranger, Jean-PhilippeT TH02:30PM-03:50PM
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[2. History of Philosophy] A lecture course surveying ancient philosophy from the Presocratics to Plato. Philosophers covered may include: Anaximander, Heraclitus, Parmenides, Empedocles, Anaxagoras, Democritus, Gorgias, Protagoras, Socrates and Plato. Through readings of original sources and ancient testimony, the course analyses key questions in ancient philosophy, e.g. what is philosophy and what does it achieve? What is nature? What is the best life? Prerequisites: Any two of PHIL 1013, 1023, 1033, 1043, 1053, 1063, or permission of the instructor.

Kant
PHIL.3613.A
Gilbert-Walsh, JamesT TH11:30AM-12:50PM
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[5. Themes and Authors]In this course, we will focus primarily on Kant's Critique of Pure Reason as we work through the implications his position has for both theoretical and moral philosophy. Prerequisite: PHIL 2153 or 2163 or permission of the instructor.

Marx
PHIL.3633.A
Gilbert-Walsh, JamesT TH01:00PM-02:20PM
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[5. Themes and Authors]This lecture course will involve a close reading of some of Karl Marx's most influential work. As we read through portions of The German Ideology, the Grundrisse, The Holy Family and Capital, we will consider 1) Marx's relationship with and response to his predecessors, and 2) his critical reassessment of philosophical and political practice, human nature, history and economic theory. Prerequistie: 9 credit hours in philosophy or permisson of the instructor.

Epistemology
PHIL.3683.A
Stapleford, ScottT TH10:00AM-11:20AM
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[5. Themes and Authors]This course is devoted to a topic of current interest in contemporary epistemology. The topic for any particular year may be selected from: skepticism, a priori justification, internalism and externalism, epistemic duty, epistemic justification, the definition and conditions of knowledge, sources of knowledge, explanation, knowledge and natural science, naturalized epistemology, analyticity. The text for the course will be either a recent monograph or a collection of articles. Prerequisites: Any two of PHIL 1013, 1023, 1033, 1043, 1053, 1063, or permission of the instructor.

Winter Semester 2018

CourseInstrDaysTime
Intro to Philosophy II
PHIL.1023.A
Gilbert-Walsh, JamesT TH10:00AM-11:20AM
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[1. Introductory]A continuation of the survey of developments in western philosophy, through lecture, reading of original sources, and discussion, from the early modern period to contemporary discussion. Focus: rationalism, empiricism, idealism, and the reactions these provoked. This course has no prerequisite.

Free Will: An Intro. to Phil.
PHIL.1043.A
Stapleford, ScottT TH01:00PM-02:20PM
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[1. Introductory]This course is an introduction to philosophy focusing on the problem of free will. Students will be introduced to the current debate, but will also consider what the great minds of the past can tell us about the possibility or impossibility of acting freely. We will draw on both historical and contemporary sources, developing skills of philosophical analysis in connection with a single, hotly disputed topic. This course has no prerequisite.

Ancient Phil. II
PHIL.2123.A
Ranger, Jean-PhilippeT TH02:30PM-03:50PM
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[2. History of Philosophy] A lecture course surveying ancient philosophy from Aristotle to Hellenistic philosophy (Epicurus, the Stoics and the Sceptics). Through readings of original sources and ancient testimony, the course analyses key questions in ancient philosophy, e.g. what can philosophy achieve? What is the nature of reality? What does it mean to live together? Prerequisites: Any two of PHIL 1013, 1023, 1033, 1043, 1053, 1063, or permission of the instructor.

Contemporary Moral Philosophy
PHIL.2233.A
Ranger, Jean-PhilippeT TH11:30AM-12:50PM
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[3. Moral Philosophy] A lecture course examining a specific topic in contemporary moral philosophy. Topics vary from year to year and may include: virtue ethics, metaethics, contemporary deontology, contemporary utilitarianism, emotivism, relativism, the is-­-ought debate, and others.

Introduction to Logic
PHIL.2513.A
Stapleford, ScottT TH10:00AM-11:20AM
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[5. Themes and Authors]A lecture course in which students learn how to identify and evaluate arguments drawn from a wide variety of sources. It will develop informal methods such as the identification of argument structure and informal fallacies. It will also develop formal methods that involve taking arguments in English, symbolizing them in a formal language, and evaluating strengths and weaknesses of the argument forms. Also covered are basic probability theory, inductive logic, and statistical reasoning.

Moral Psychology
PHIL.2543.A
Stapleford, ScottM W02:30PM-03:50PM
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[5. Themes and Authors]Are moral judgements grounded in emotion or reason? Under what conditions are people morally responsible? Why should I be moral? Are all moral decisions motivated by self-interest? Do moral reasons depend on desires? How does virtue relate to moral motivation? These questions are central to moral psychology. The course presupposes no background in philosophy and may be of interest to students in psychology and the life sciences, as well as philosophy. This course will not count toward credits in Psychology (i.e. a Major). Prerequisites: none.

Hegel
PHIL.3623.A
Gilbert-Walsh, JamesT TH08:30AM-09:50AM
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[5. Themes and Authors]This course will involve a careful study of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit, focusing primarily on the relationships between theory and practice, and truth and history. Prerequisite: PHIL 2153 or 2163 or permission of the instructor.

Last Published: Fri Dec 15 06:05:01 2017