Political Science

Courses

Please note that not every course listed is offered each year and that students should consult the following sources for current course offerings:

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

POLS-1003. Great Books on Politics and Modern Democracy

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the problem of power and the principles of liberty and equality in modern government through the reading of several great books on the topic. It will draw on texts by authors such as Aristotle, Shakespeare, Locke, Melville, Mill, Marx, Tocqueville, Jack London, Robert Penn Warren, Chinua Achebe, and Virginia Woolf. We may also study a small number of films in the course.

POLS-1006. Introduction to Political Science

This course is normally taught as part of the Aquinas Programme. Through the study of a small number of core texts, it provides an introduction to some of the key questions at the centre of political life. The course provides students with a solid foundation in the history of political thought. It also concentrates on the development of the skills in logical analysis, writing, and political argument necessary for upper-level courses in the discipline.

POLS-1013. Law, Power, and Politics

This course is an introduction to the study of politics. It has two objectives. The first is to give students a sense of the meaning and importance of politics. The second is to study a number of the concepts essential to the study of contemporary politics: the state, sovereignty, legitimacy and authority, law, power, equality, democracy, nationality, freedom and citizenship are typically covered. The specific content and readings used vary from section to section.

POLS-1103. Canadian Government (HMRT)

This course provides an introduction to the concepts of the regime, authority, the rule of law, citizenship, and political obligation. It does so through a consideration of the institutions of Canadian government and covers the following topics: the framing of the constitution, federalism, parliamentary government, the Charter of Rights, the judiciary, political parties, public opinion, interest groups, and constitutional reform.

POLS-1603. Global Politics

This course provides an introduction to the concepts of nation and state, sovereignty, forms of government, and political conflict. It does so through consideration of issues in world politics, such as human rights and social justice, ecological imbalance, economic inequalities, war, global governmental institutions and organizations.

2. Canadian Government and Politics

POLS-2103. Canadian Constitutional Politics

This course will examine fundamental disagreements at the core of the Canadian polity that have plagued constitutional debate since its creation. Special attention is paid to the constitutional implications of conflicting conceptions of individual, provincial, ethno-linguistic, and multi-national equality.

POLS-2113. Contemporary Issues in Canadian Politics

This course will examine a number of issues animating Canadian politics. Themes may include public policy problems, the stresses of Canadian federalism, the fortunes of political parties, ethics in government, and Canada in the global political context.

POLS-3103. Political Parties and Elections in Canada (ENVS 3103)

Canada's major national parties are examined in regard to their historical evolution, internal structure, ideological orientation, and public image and reputation. Trends in voting behaviour are discussed, as are the implications of voting patterns in Canada. Distinctive provincial political parties (such as the Parti Quebecois) are also considered.

POLS-3113. Canadian Federalism: Theory and Practice

This course examines the idea of federalism in Canada and how those ideas take shape in the practice of Canadian federalism. Attention is paid to the political theory of federalism, the institutions of federalism, and the diversities which underlie the Canadian federal system.

POLS-3123. The Canadian Constitution: Federalism (ENVS 3123)

This course will focus on the manner in which the evolution of constitutional law has shaped the Canadian federal system. The course will proceed primarily by means of class discussion of leading constitutional decisions and by student presentations.

POLS-3133. The Canadian Constitution: The Charter of Rights and Freedoms

This course will focus on the impact our constitution has had on civil liberties in Canada. The course will proceed primarily by means of class discussion of leading constitutional decision and student presentations.

POLS-3203. Canadian Provincial Politics

The course offers a comparative view of the Canadian provinces. Provincial cabinets, party systems, legislative development, and economic and social issues are considered. Special attention is directed to the problem of Quebec in Confederation.

POLS-3213. Media and Politics in Canada (COPP 3033, ENVS 2313)

This course will examine the role of media in Canadian politics and government. It will examine the effect of media on policy agenda setting and public opinion, and how political elites seek to use media to advance political goals. Prerequisites: POLS 1013 or consent of instructor.

POLS-3223. Public Administration

This course will focus on selected public policy issues in contemporary New Brunswick politics. Special attention will be given to the problems of intergovernmental affairs, recent constitutional negotiations, cabinet policy development, and public finance.

POLS-4103. Seminar in Canadian Government and Politics

This is a seminar directed primarily at Political Science Majors and Honours students. The specific topic of the seminar will change from year to year. Students will be expected to do advanced research and to present and defend their work in class. Prerequisite: POLS 2103 or permission of the instructor.

3. Comparative Government and Politics

POLS-2303. Comparative Politics of the Developed World

This course introduces students to the comparative study of governments in the industrial and post-industrial societies. It examines the question of how various political systems are classified, dealing with such issues as organization of the state, governance and policy-making, representation, and political legitimacy. Prerequisite: 3 credits in Political Science.

POLS-2313. Comparative Politics of the Developing Areas

This course introduces students to the comparative study of governments in the developing world. It focuses on such issues as the politics of development, modernization, and the interplay of political and social forces in selected developing nations. Prerequisite: 3 credits in Political Science.

POLS-2323. Religion and Politics

Religious traditions and actors mobilize and in turn are mobilized by political movements at international, national, and community-based levels. Within a multi-religious and comparative framework, this course explores the way in which religious and political identities, actors, and systems interact on issues related, for example, to religiously-based political parties, democratization movements, nationalism, fundamentalism, and the politics of resistance.

POLS-3003. Special Topics

The content of this course changes from year to year to reflect the special strengths of faculty and particular needs of students.

POLS-3306. U.S. Government and Politics

This course examines the national political institutions of the United States of America - Congress, the Presidency, the Supreme Court, and the federal bureaucracy. Political parties, interest groups, elections, and the role of the media will also be studied. Issues surrounding the modern presidency, as well as those involving social and moral issues.

POLS-3323. Political Leadership: Local, National, and Global

This course will be a study of the fundamental concepts and prevalent theories of political leadership using a comparative methodology involving local, national, and global levels of leadership. It will allow students to study the significance of individual leaders' personalities, styles, and ideas in relation to their institutional and cultural contexts.

POLS-3333. Introduction to Political Economy

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the study of political economy as a subfield of political science. The first part of the course examines main conceptual frameworks in the study of the relationship between states and markets on the basis of classic readings. The second part of the course covers topics in market regulation, politics of development, and international political economy. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours from POLS 1000 level or permission of the instructor.

POLS-3413. The European Union and Europe

This course examines the formation and present politics of the European Union (EU), a unique community of democratic countries that agreed to delegate some of their sovereignty to common institutions. The course will look at the history of European integration, the key institutions and policies of the EU, and ongoing debates about European identity, EU enlargement, and economic developments in the Euro zone.

POLS-3423. Politics & Society in Russia and Eurasia

This course examines politics and society in Russia and Eurasia, focusing on the post-communist transitions, Russia's relations with other post-Soviet states, and the nexus between domestic and international politics of the region. Prerequisite: POLS 2303 or permission of the instructor.

POLS-4303. Seminar in Comparative Politics

Designed as an upper-level seminar for students of Political Science, this course will focus on theories of comparative politics and their application to a major issue of interest to the discipline. Prerequisite: POLS 2303 and 2313, or permission of the instructor.

4. International Relations and Foreign Policy

POLS-2006. Russian Foreign Policy and Postcommunist Transitions

This course examines politics and society in Eastern European countries, focusing on the post-communist transitions in Russia and the Baltics, Russia's relations with other post-Soviet states, and the nexus between domestic and international politics of the region. It addresses historical changes in politics and society of the post-Soviet nations, specifically during their postcommunist period of development and on their relations with the EU, Russia, and each other. The aim of the course is to introduce the current issues and mutual relations of and between the European Union and the Russian Federation, as well as the foreign policy and security challenges faced by both regions.

POLS-2603. Political and Economic Integration in the Americas

This course will examine economic and political integration theory in relation to theories of globalization, using the European Union and the Americas as central cases. The course will analyze, in depth, the issues of social justice, labour and environmental standards, poverty, gender issues, capitalism, and social democracy. This course will have online interactive features and may be taught in collaboration with other universities.

POLS-2613. International Relations I

This course introduces students to International Relations theory, with a focus on the mainstream theories in the field, namely realism and its variants, liberalism and constructivism. These theories are illustrated and developed through the use of case studies and examinations of the institutions and structures of the international system. Prerequisite: POLS 1013 or permission of the instructor.

POLS-2623. International Relations II

This course introduces students to the critical and non-mainstream variants of International Relations (IR) theory. These include Marxism, Gramscianism, feminist theories of IR, and other forms of critical theory. These theories are illustrated and developed through the use of case studies and examinations of the institutions and structures of the international system. They are also contrasted with mainstream IR theories. Prerequisite: POLS 1013 or permission of the instructor.

POLS-3313. U.S. Foreign Policy

This course examines the foreign policy of the United States of America. It examines the roles of the Presidency, bureaucracy, and Congress in the making of foreign policy. The history of American foreign policy will be studied to contextualize present foreign policy and likely future scenarios. The impact of U.S. economic policy in an era of globalization will be explored. Central to the course will be an investigation of the relationship of the U.S. to other major powers and to international institutions.

POLS-3503. Human Rights and International Relations

This course considers human rights in international relations. It focuses on how the emerging human rights regime is affecting the practice of traditional state sovereignty. Special attention will be paid to the political and philosophical arguments around such issues as universal human rights versus cultural relativism, and the problems associated with humanitarian intervention.

POLS-3513. Canadian Perspectives on International Law

The course covers the major topics of international law: the law creation process, the law application process, participants in international law, territory and resources, and international dispute settlement. The lectures on each topic focus on particular Canadian economic, political, or geographic characteristics that raise legal questions, and discuss how Canada has interpreted and tried to influence the law in question.

POLS-3523. International Relations in the Asia Pacific Region

This course will focus on how the relations of the regional powers (China, Japan, and the United States) intersect and affect the shape of the Asia Pacific's politics and economics. The course will also provide an overview of the interactions between the other regional states and the various efforts to build Asia Pacific-wide economic and security institutions.

POLS-3533. Canadian Foreign Policy

This course is a study of Canada and its role in the world. It will focus, in particular, on the historical development of Canada's foreign policy and the continuities between the past and the present. Is Canada a principal power or is it highly constrained by the imperatives of its relationship with the United States? A significant component of the course will be spent in evaluating Canada's role in a post-Cold War and post-9/11 world. Particular attention will be paid to issues related to the question of multilateralism and Canada's evolving approach to this tradition. Prerequisite: POLS 2613 or POLS 2623 or permission of the instructor.

POLS-3603. The United Nations

This course will examine the UN as an international political institution, its structure and processes in the context of contemporary and enduring issues of world politics, including peace, security, development, and environmental sustainability.

POLS-3613. Model United Nations (COPP)

This course will prepare students for participation in a Model United Nations, either Canadian or American sponsored. In a model UN simulation, students represent an assigned country's foreign policy on assigned issues on the UN agenda. The course will begin with an examination of the UN and its procedures. Subsequent topics will include researching the assigned UN issues and the assigned country's policy on them; preparation of working papers and motions, and strategies for effective conference participation. Fund raising for the trip required: half credit course, but meets first and second terms; limited enrolment.

POLS-4603. Seminar in International Relations

This is a seminar directed primarily at senior Political Science Majors and Honours students. The specific topic of the seminar will change from year to year, but will consider, in depth, an issue or issues in international relations. Students will be expected to do advanced research and to present and defend their work in class. Prerequisite: POLS 2613 or 2623, or permission of the instructor.

5. Political Philosophy

POLS-2703. Philosophy of Human Rights

This course will introduce to students philosophical questions concerning the foundations of human rights. On what are human rights based? What makes something a human right? Are human rights universally and permanently valid or is the notion of human rights merely a construct of Western culture? The course will familiarize students with alternative theoretical answers to these and other related questions.

POLS-2803. Western Tradition of Political Philosophy I (HMRT)

This course will introduce students to seminal texts in political philosophy focussing on the ancient and early medieval period. Texts may include: Plato's Apology, Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics, Aristotle's Politics, Bible, and St. Augustine's City of God.

POLS-2806. The Western Tradition of Political Philosophy

This course will introduce students to the following seminal texts in the Western political tradition: Plato, The Republic; The Apology of Socrates; Aristotle, The Poetics; Machiavelli, The Prince; Hobbes, Leviathan; Locke, Two Treatises of Government; Rousseau, Discourse on Inequality; Marx, 1844 Manuscripts, Communist Manifesto; Nietzsche, The Genealogy of Morals. Students cannot receive credit for 2806 and either 2803 or 2813.

POLS-2813. Western Tradition of Political Philosophy II (HMRT)

This course will introduce students to seminal texts in political philosophy focussing on the medieval, early modern and modern periods. Texts may include: Aquinas' Treatise on Law, Machiavelli's The Prince, Hobbes' Leviathan, Locke's The Second Treatise on Government, Rousseau's Discourses, Hegel's Introduction to the Philosophy of History. Prerequisite: POLS 2803.

POLS-3706. Shakespeare and Politics

This course will explore the works of Shakespeare in the context of Renaissance political thought as reflected in his plays and in early modern political texts. We will focus on the plays, although Shakespeare's non-dramatic works may be included, as well as modern film adaptations. Prerequisite: ENGL 1006 or permission of instructor.

POLS-3813. Classical Political Philosophy

In this course, students will engage in an intensive study of a small number of texts by some of the following authors: Herodotus, Thucydides, Aristophanes, Plato, Xenophon, and Aristotle. Among the problems to be considered are: the nature of justice, the character of the best regime, the good life for a human being, and the relationship between the individual and the political community. Prerequisite: POLS 2803 (or 2806) or permission of the instructor.

POLS-3823. Modern Political Philosophy

The focus of this course is on the problems modern political philosophy has confronted in attempting to show how nature can be used as a standard for judging the best life and the just political order. The writings of one or two of the following authors will be considered: Machiavelli, Hobbes, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Burke, Jefferson, Nietzsche, and Heidegger. Prerequisite: POLS 2803 and 2813 (or 2806) or permission of the instructor.

POLS-3833. Women in Western Political Thought

An examination of selected texts in ancient and modern political philosophy focusing on understanding both historical and current accounts of the role of women in the political community. Texts will vary from year to year but may include Aristotle's Politics, Aquinas' Summa Theologia, Locke's Two Treatises on Government, Engels' The Origin of Family, de Beauvoir's The Second Sex, and Firestone's The Dialectic of Sex.

POLS-3843. Catholic Social Teaching and Contemporary Issues (CATH)

Rooted in scripture, philosophy, and theology, Catholic social teaching proposes principles of justice that emphasize the dignity of the human person, the value of economic and political institutions, and the importance of a common good. This course analyses these principles and their application to contemporary social, political, and economic issues, through particular reference to official documents of the Catholic Church. Prerequisite: CATH 2003 or permission of the instructor.

POLS-4803. Seminar in Political Philosophy

This course will involve the intensive study of a theme or an author or authors in the history of political philosophy. Students will be expected to engage in advanced study and to make regular presentations to the class. Prerequisite: POLS 2803 and 2813 (or 2806) or permission of the instructor.

6. Honours

POLS-3913. Honours Thesis Proposal

The purpose of this course is to afford students who seek to write the Honours thesis an opportunity to develop a thorough thesis proposal, including a substantial annotated bibliography. A small number of classes will be held at the beginning of the course in order to show students how to prepare the proposal. Thereafter, the class will meet only occasionally.

POLS-4903. Capstone Seminar - Problems in Political Inquiry

This course is intended to serve as a capstone seminar for majors and Honours students in Political Science. The course is an investigation of the perennial issues involved in the study of politics. We shall examine critically the dominant approaches in Political Science with the aim of understanding how the method utilized affects the substance of any account of political phenomena.

POLS-4923. Honours Thesis

The Honours thesis is an extended scholarly paper on a topic written under the supervision of a faculty member who agrees to serve as thesis Director. Students will be expected to follow the Guidelines for the Honours Thesis published by the Department of Political Science. Students must have completed POLS 3913, Honours Thesis Proposal, with a minimum grade of B to be eligible for POLS 4923.

7. Independent Study

POLS-4003. Independent Study

Students may undertake independent studies under the direction of a member or members of the Department with the permission of the Department Chair. The course is limited to students of proven academic merit. It is expected that the students will have a clear idea of their area of study, and they will be expected to submit a written proposal about it, including a preliminary bibliography, research topic, and argument justifying it as an independent course of study.

POLS-4006. Independent Study

Students may undertake independent studies under the direction of a member or members of the Department with the permission of the Department Chair. The course is limited to students of proven academic merit. It is expected that the students will have a clear idea of their area of study, and they will be expected to submit a written proposal about it, including a preliminary bibliography, research topic, and argument justifying it as an independent course of study.

POLS-4013. Independent Study

Students may undertake independent studies under the direction of a member or members of the Department with the permission of the Department Chair. The course is limited to students of proven academic merit. It is expected that the students will have a clear idea of their area of study, and they will be expected to submit a written proposal about it, including a preliminary bibliography, research topic, and argument justifying it as an independent course of study.

Last Published: Fri Dec 15 06:05:01 2017