Social Work

Courses

 

Post-Degree Courses

SCWK-5006. Preparation for Professional Social Work Practice (F)

The purpose of this course is the development of personal and professional skills that prepare students for professional critical social work practice. This includes a focus on increasing self-awareness and mindfulness as important knowledge for practice; an emphasis on developing skills for experiential learning; an orientation to the values and characteristics of a competent social work professional and social work practice; and the development of beginning competency in generic crisis intervention theory and skills common to all levels of social work practice. Additionally, the course will prepare students for their initial field education experience through the clarification of expectations of students in a field placement that includes an emphasis on preparation of learning contracts.

SCWK-5012. Field Instruction III (K)

This course provides practical experience in the field, in an approved setting, under faculty supervision. Students are expected to develop knowledge and skills in the field sufficient for initial professional practice with various client constituencies. 700 hours. Note: This course is 12 credit hours.

SCWK-5013. Group Work Theory and Design (F)

This is a laboratory course in which students will develop skills in group membership, leadership, and programme design. Practical group experiences and reflection activities are utilized to demonstrate theories of group dynamics and development, and to enhance group assessment and intervention skills. Note: This course is delivered in two separate modules; the first at the beginning of the program, and the second module at the beginning of the second semester.

SCWK-5023. The Profession of Social Work in Context (F) (K)

This is a mandatory course for all students upon entry into the BSW program. It introduces students to the foundations of the BSW program, and provides broad conceptual frameworks for a critical understanding of social work in Canadian contexts. The course is an introduction to the purpose, history, values, ethics, and methods of professional social work practice, and to the social welfare system that influences this practice. The scope of generalist practice with a range of populations in diverse settings will be explored.

SCWK-5036. Theory of Social Work Practice I (F) (K)

This is a mandatory course for all post-degree BSW students. A central assumption of this course is that social work as a profession needs to be self-critical in order to guard against continuing and increasing oppression experienced by members of various groups as they access social welfare programmes and social work intervention. Therefore a critical analysis of social welfare, social services and social work practice (primarily in the Canadian context) will be a central focus in the course.

SCWK-5046. Theory for Social Work Practice II (F) (K)

This is a mandatory course for all post-degree BSW students. The course provides a base for professional practice by introducing the values and ethics of the profession, and theories relevant to social work practice with individuals, groups, and communities. Knowledge drawn from the social sciences and other disciplines will be integrated with methods of intervention. Prerequisites: SCWK 5036.

SCWK-5059. Field Instruction I (F)

This is a mandatory course for all post-degree BSW students. The course provides a base for professional practice by introducing the values and ethics of the profession, and theories relevant to social work practice with individuals, groups, and communities. Knowledge drawn from the social sciences and other disciplines will be integrated with methods of intervention. Prerequisites: SCWK 5036. Note: This course is 9 credit hours.

SCWK-5063. Field Integration Seminar I (F)

Mandatory for post-degree BSW students, this seminar enables students to relate practice issues to social theory, and to develop a personal credo for social work. Students will explore solutions to actual issues encountered during their practicum placements by drawing upon their social work knowledge and value and skill bases.

SCWK-5073. Field Integration Seminar II (F)

This seminar, which runs parallel with the Social Action Field Placement, enables students to connect practice and practice issues with the theory and concepts of social action and social change. Students will critically analyze practice situations and contexts, the nature of the desired change, and strategies and actions to pursue it. They will collectively explore practice challenges and problem-solve to generate solutions and action plans. Case studies of successful participatory research and social action will be analyzed.

SCWK-5083. Field Instruction II (F)

This course is a continuation of the Field Instruction I course. It will provide practical experience in the field, in an approved setting, two days per week. Students are expected to develop knowledge and skills in small teams utilizing a community based approach to practice under the supervision of faculty liaison. Prerequisite: Field Instruction I. Available to Post-Degree BSW students only.

SCWK-5113. Generalist Social Work Practice Skills (F) (S)

This is a mandatory course for all BSW students. An introduction to the theory and skills of helping individuals. The course will focus on understanding the stages of the helping process and on the acquisition of specific skills in communicating, assessing problems, planning, contracting, implementing change, and terminating the process. The skills of writing social work records will also be emphasized.

SCWK-5116. Generalist Social Work Practice Skills (F) (K)

This course is an introduction to the theory and skills of helping individuals and families. The course will focus on understanding the stages of the helping process, ethics, and the acquisition of specific skills in communicating, assessing problems, planning, contracting, implementing change, and terminating the process. In addition, the course will include theory and skills related to practice situations that arise in almost all social work contexts - family interviews, grief work, crisis intervention, and work with people from cultures, religions and orientation other than one's own. The skills of writing social work records will be emphasized.

SCWK-5123. Social Work Practice in Diverse Contexts (F)

The purpose of this course is two-fold. The first being to prepare students for their initial field practice experience. The second is to explore the theory and skills relevant to crisis intervention, work with family diversity, spirituality, issues of gender, sexual orientation and culture. This includes an orientation to the values and characteristics of anti-oppressive practice, with a focus on understanding the basic principles and skills of an empowering approach to practice. It is intended that students will be able to generalize both knowledge and skills to diverse populations and contexts in which they may intervene. Students will also develop a beginning competency in generic skills common to all levels of social work practice.

SCWK-5213. Fundamentals of Community Organizing (F)

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of community organization. It provides a beginning knowledge base and skills for facilitating social change in the context of community. Content areas include the nature of community, the process of community organizing, strategies such as social action, diversity and social change, and the role of the community worker.

SCWK-5223. Organizing for Action with Diverse Groups (F) (K)

The pursuit of social justice is a core value of both social work education and social work practice. The purpose of this course is to teach students the historical context, the fundamental concepts, and the direct skills necessary for organizing and enacting social change efforts within diverse contexts and with diverse groups. Students will be exposed to various theories of social change, multiple modes of working for social change, and techniques for strategizing for maximum effectiveness in pursuing change efforts. Students will be expected to use their knowledge in an applied manner and will engage in hands on change efforts with diverse groups and in various diverse contexts.

SCWK-5263. Social Work in Rural Areas (F)

Much of the social work knowledge and practice was developed in large urban areas and has limited relevance to non-urban areas such as rural New Brunswick. This course will examine the unique nature of rural areas and the implication that this unique nature holds for the social work practitioner. The emphasis of the course will be on the generic nature of rural interventions and the need to maintain an orderly and well-defined problem-solving approach which is sensitive to individual and community issues.

SCWK-5313. Social Policy in the Canadian Context (F) (K)

Concepts in policy planning are studied, along with an examination of the process of planned change from problem identification to programming. Consideration will be given to the political arena, the bureaucracy and roles of the politician, and the public servant. Three hours per week.

SCWK-5323. Social Policy - Current Issues and Global Contexts (F)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to develop a beginning awareness, sensitivity, and understanding of the scope and impact of global or international issues on the lives of people in other parts of the world and our own lives, as well as on social policies and social work practice at all levels. As well, this course will explore the efforts of organizations (at the local, national, and international levels) which address international concerns.

SCWK-5513. Social Work, Organizations and Native People (K)

This course will assist social workers to practice in human service organizations in Native communities. The course will include a theoretical and historical analysis of why and how specific organizations such as the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (DIAND) affect First Nations communities. There will be an emphasis on issues of leadership and on the political organizations that are relevant to First Nations. Issues of self-determination and implications for social work practice will also be discussed.

SCWK-5713. Introduction to Research Menthods and Statistics in Social Work (Indigenous Focus) (F) (K)

This class provides an introduction to Indigenous and Western research paradigms and methods with an emphasis on social workers as social justice researchers. Students will learn about a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods. The focus will be on social justice oriented qualitative research methods, mainly Indigenous, anti-oppressive, and other critical approaches. Some quantitative methods endorsed by Indigenous scholars and communities will be highlighted.

SCWK-5723. Child Welfare (F)

This course is designed to introduce students to the child welfare system in New Brunswick and Canada, and to examine the policies, procedures, and practices which have been developed to respond to the needs of children and adolescents. As such, another purpose of the course is to critique existing policies, procedures, and practices and to discuss ways in which the child welfare delivery system could be more responsive to the needs of children and their families. Alternative responses and innovative programmes will be examined and students will be challenged to be creative in developing ideas which would lead to evolving the child welfare system in the direction of better meeting children's needs.

SCWK-5733. Social Work and Aging (F)

An examination of present services to the elderly population in New Brunswick and elsewhere, and identification of unmet needs. Analysis of knowledge and practice principles developed in the field of gerontological practice.

SCWK-5763. Spirituality and Social Work (F) (K)

The overall goal of this course is to explore the role of spirituality in social work, and to identify how the spiritual dimension can be incorporated into social work practice. Students will be exposed to a discussion of the religious/spiritual dimensions of human behaviour and the impact religions and/or spiritual issues have on individual growth, community functioning, policy development, and social change. Students will also have an opportunity to reconcile their spiritual beliefs with professional expectations and to develop a beginning level of comfort and competence at integrating the spiritual in practice.

SCWK-5783. Law and Social Work (F)

An examination of the relationship between the institutions of law and social welfare. The role of social work in the administration of justice. Basic legal concepts useful to social workers.

SCWK-5813. Native Child Welfare (F) (K)

This course will provide theoretical frameworks and practice skills relevant to the field of child welfare in Native communities in Canada. As well, the course will review historical development and cultural factors which influence Native child welfare policies, services, and programmes.

SCWK-5823. Ecology and Social Justice (F)

This course will examine the relationship between ecological devastation and social injustice. The course will review the forces, both national and global as well as governmental and nongovernmental, which contribute to the exploitation of the environment and people. Values, policies, and interventions which are conducive to bringing about social and ecological justice will be examined. Potential roles for social work, particularly at the individual, community, and societal levels, will be discussed.

SCWK-5843. Social Work With the Bereaved (F)

This course is designed to familiarize students with the impact that loss has on one's everyday life, to examine theoretically the concepts of grief and bereavement, and to be able to integrate those theories into social work practice. Loss on multiple levels will be explored; including loss experienced through ill health, breakup of relationships, life-changing events, and death. Grief counselling theories and skills will be an interlinked component of the course.

SCWK-5853. Mental Health Issues and Professional Practice (F) (K)

This course examines mental health issues encountered by the professional with an emphasis on practice and policy implications. Students will have an opportunity to explore the context of practice from an historical perspective and to critically examine the current mental health delivery system in New Brunswick. The role of the professional and professional interventions will be examined.

SCWK-5863. Social Work and Addictions (F) (K)

In this course, students will develop an understanding of the components of substance abuse as well as the addictive process. Topics will include the various mood-altering drugs, the components of early identification, assessment and treatment, harm reduction, and health promotion programmes.

SCWK-5923. Trauma and Social Work Practice (F)

This is an elective course for all BSW students. This course provides an introduction to social work practice with individuals, families, groups and communities who are coping with the impact of trauma in their lives. The goals of this course involve students developing and demonstrating a critical understanding of trauma theory in its historical, political and social contexts; knowledge of practice approaches to trauma work; application of this knowledge through assessment and beginning intervention skills; and self-awareness in relation to traumatic material. Exploration of trauma theory beyond the dominant individualized, westernized, and medical model will be emphasized in the course. Ethical issues and exploration of personal and professional values, as they pertain to trauma work, will be incorporated into class material.

SCWK-5943. Ethics in Social Work Practice (F)

Using a case study approach that draws upon practice experiences of New Brunswick social workers, this course explores ethical issues and dilemmas across population groups, and levels and fields of practice. The goals of this course involve students developing and demonstrating a critical understanding of ethics theory situated within a sociopolitical and cultural context; knowledge of common ethical issues in social work practice and ethical guidelines impacting on practice; application of this knowledge through assessment and ethical decision making skills; and self-awareness in relation to these issues.

SCWK-5963. Narrative for Social Work(ers)

This course will explore the theory and practice of narrative as it relates to social work. Integrating narrative theory with personal and professional experience, the course will provide an opportunity for students to explore how narrative can provide a creative and constructive way of working with service users, both individually and collectively. The course will cover narrative theory, narrative therapy, thinking with stories for personal and professional development and working with narratives in groups and with those who are narratively dispossessed.

Undergraduate Courses

SCWK-2013. Introduction to Social Welfare (S)

An examination of the history, philosophy, and development of social welfare as a social institution in New Brunswick and elsewhere. Analysis of the institution and its relationship to the history, philosophy, and values of the profession of social work.

SCWK-2023. Introduction to Social Work (S)

An introduction to the values, ethics, history, and methods of professional social work practice, with particular emphasis on the profession in New Brunswick. An introduction to generic practice and social work with various client groups.

SCWK-2033. Introduction to Social Work Fields of Practice (F)

This is a survey course for all students interested in social work, curious about the relevance of arts and social science disciplines to social work fields of practice, and/or who wish to explore the profession as a potential career choice. Students will be introduced to the values, ethics, history and requirements of professional social work practice, with particular emphasis on social justice issues. Students will also have an opportunity to explore the various social work fields of practice.

SCWK-2503. Research Strategies in Native Studies (NATI)

Surveys various research strategies from Anthropology and Sociology and assesses their applicability to, and compatibility with, Native Studies. Considers special protocol and ethical questions in research on Native Peoples. Prerequisite: NATI 1006 or by special permission of instructor.

SCWK-3603. Native People and the Colonial Experience (NATI)

This course will look at colonialism as a strategy of imperialism and as a model for understanding North American Native history. Different types of colonialism will be explored, i.e. classic, internal, and neocolonialism, and an emphasis will be placed on the history and continuing impact of colonialism on Indigenous peoples and cultures of North America. The course will also analyze Christian missions, the fur trade, and colonial government policies, as well as exploitation, racism, war, indoctrination, genocide, and cultural appropriation as manifestations of colonialism. Responses to colonialism, including resistance and decolonization, will also be considered. Prerequisite: NATI 1006.

SCWK-3813. Native Cultural Identity and Cultural Survival (NATI)

Considers cultural identity and survival within the context of inequality (power, wealth and status). Focuses on the ways in which Native language, group solidarity and community offer cultural completeness, acting as barriers to assimilation. Historic and contemporary Native cultures are presented as dynamic and flexible. Prerequisite NATI 1006 or SOCI 1006.

SCWK-3843. Suicide and Indigenous Peoples (NATI)

Suicide is, and has been for nobody knows how long, rampant in indigenous populations in Canada. Despite well-publicized projects targeting specific communities, none of the interventions have been able to demonstrate any positive effect; if anything, the problem continues to worsen. We examine critically the field of Suicidology as it applies to the Native Peoples of Canada and suggest reasons why efforts to prevent suicide have not paid off. We also explore different kinds of interventions that may be more successful.

SCWK-3853. Alcohol, Drugs, and Indigenous Peoples (NATI)

This course provides an introduction to issues of alcohol and drug use/abuse in indigenous communities (concentrating on Canada for the most part, but including reference to such issues in other indigenous communities worldwide). Traditional uses of substances which alter consciousness are reviewed, as well as the role that the introduction of unfamiliar psychoactive substances played in European expansionism and colonialism. Modern models of addiction and programs for recovery are critically examined and placed within the context of creating a continuing marginalization of indigenous cultures by dominating ones.

SCWK-3973. Introduction to Narrative and Narrative Analysis (SOC GERO PSYC ENGL)

Framed around three key approaches to narrative this course will provide students with the basis on which to develop their understanding of narrative and their skills in narrative analysis. The three approaches are: the narrative study of lives; the narrative analysis of texts; and, the analysis of narrative dynamics. Through these approaches students will be introduced to the work of key narrative thinkers. The course, in content and delivery, reflects the inter-disciplinary nature of narrative.

Last Published: Sat Dec 16 06:05:01 2017