Sociology

Fall Semester 2017

CourseInstrDaysTime
Introduction to Sociology
SOCI.1006.A1
Allain, KristiM W F10:30AM-11:20AM
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

Introduction to Sociology
SOCI.1006.B1
Fredericks, ErinM W F11:30AM-12:20PM
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

Introduction to Sociology
SOCI.1006.C1
Allain, KristiM W F12:30PM-01:20PM
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

Introduction to Sociology
SOCI.1006.D1
Luke, AlisonM W02:30PM-03:50PM
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

Introduction to Sociology
SOCI.1006.E1
Caliskan, GulhanimT TH10:00AM-11:20AM
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

Introduction to Sociology
SOCI.1006.F1
McCoy, RobertT TH11:30AM-12:50PM
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

Research Design
SOCI.2013.A
Seifert, RoisinM W02:30PM-03:50PM
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An introduction to the main research approaches used in sociology. The course includes practical experience in developing a research program by considering research question development, research design, methods of data collection, research ethics and data analysis. Of particular interest are the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches.

Introduction to Statistics
SOCI.2023.A
Luke, AlisonM W F12:30PM-01:20PM
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An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. The main emphasis will be on the use and meaning of the principal statistics used in sociology and social work. Note: This course may not be taken for credit by students who already have received credit for an introductory statistics course in another discipline at STU or from another university.

Classical Sociological Theory
SOCI.2033.A
Kelly, ColmT TH04:00PM-05:20PM
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A study of the classical tradition in sociological thought focusing on those theorists whose ideas constitute the foundation of contemporary sociological analysis. This will include a consideration of the work of Marx, Weber, Durkheim, among others.

Classical Sociological Theory
SOCI.2033.B
Hayes, MatthewT TH10:00AM-11:20AM
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A study of the classical tradition in sociological thought focusing on those theorists whose ideas constitute the foundation of contemporary sociological analysis. This will include a consideration of the work of Marx, Weber, Durkheim, among others.

Sociology of Atlantic Canada
SOCI.2116.A1
Curtis Maillet, DonnaW F09:00AM-10:20AM
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This course is designed as an introduction to the sociological study of Atlantic Canada. The first term focuses on the development of the Maritimes and Newfoundland from mercantile societies to under-developed regions within the centralized Canadian economy. The second term focuses on the contemporary structure, problems, and issues of Atlantic Canadian society.

Deviance
SOCI.2313.A
Rawlinson, EdM W F11:30AM-12:20PM
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This course reviews theory and research with a focus on the social basis of deviance, deviance construction, and the consequences of social reactions to selected forms of deviance.

Inequality in Society
SOCI.2416.A1
Fleming, MichaelT TH08:30AM-09:50AM
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This course explores existing patterns of social inequality and debates concerning the possibility and desirability of greater equality. Taking a theoretical and historical focus, this course examines the changing nature of inequality in contemporary Canadian society in the context of globalization. Throughout, we develop our understanding of how different forms of inequality - particularly social class, gender and race - intersect. One section of the course may have a service learning requirement, where students engage in volunteer work in the community, and then reflect upon their experiences through reading, writing, and discussion.

Social Problems I
SOCI.2423.A
Rawlinson, EdT TH01:00PM-02:20PM
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The various perspectives used by sociologists to examine social problems will be described and evaluated. Concrete social problems will be used as examples of these perspectives.

Sociology of Sport
SOCI.2563.A
Hersey, CorinneT TH11:30AM-12:50PM
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This course unpacks issues associated with sport in North America. Students are asked to critically engage with sport practices as they intersect various social phenomena including identity, nationalism, the body, colonialism, and the family. Students examine how power operates through the practices associated with sport and consider the potential, and consequences, of using sport for social change.

Sociology of the Family
SOCI.2633.A
Hersey, CorinneM07:00PM-09:50PM
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A critical analysis of various conceptual frameworks in family research, and a cross-cultural analysis of marriage and the family, both past and present is pursued. Particular attention is paid to the current developments in marriage arrangements, changes in the meaning of marriage and the family, as well as the future of the family.

Political Sociology
SOCI.3113.A
Fleming, MichaelM W F10:30AM-11:20AM
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The focus of this course is on the type of political system known as liberal democracy. Particular emphasis is placed on the historical genesis of liberal democracy, on its structural dynamics, and on the role of the working class within the system. The examination includes an analysis of the sources of stability and cleavage governing the development of liberal democracies. Finally, the functioning of liberal democracies is contrasted with that of communist political systems.

Social Movements
SOCI.3123.A
Hersey, CorinneT TH08:30AM-09:50AM
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The emphasis of this course is on one specific type of social movement - movements of political protest. Two sorts of questions are emphasized: (1) the structural conditions conducive to the development of movements of political protest and (2) the factors conditioning the actual mobilization of protest. Although the social movements examined are diverse, ranging from the Rumanian rebellion in 1907 to the rebellion of 1837 in Upper Canada, special emphasis is placed on the almost simultaneous appearance of both left and right wing populist protest in Western Canada.

Globalization and Gender
SOCI.3223.A
Caliskan, GulhanimT02:30PM-05:20PM
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Globalization and Gender examines how definitions of gender and sexuality are reproduced, negotiated and deployed in the context of globalization and transnational flows. Through a critical inquiry into a variety of theoretical texts, ethnographic case studies and analysis of media representation, students examine the topics of citizenship, global labor flows, migration, militarization, neoliberalism and the construction of the gendered global subject. They study both the opportunities and challenges that are inherent in postcolonial and transnational feminist scholarship and activism. Prerequisite: SOCI-1006 Introduction to Sociology or instructor's permission.

Sociology of Education
SOCI.3513.A
Weeks, PeterW F09:00AM-10:20AM
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This course focuses on the nature of the relationship between school systems and the broader societies of which they are a part. This is done with two purposes in mind: (1) to determine both the structural configuration and the functions of education in contemporary society and (2) to demonstrate the effects of this relationship on the internal functioning of schools. A variety of theoretical perspectives on the conceptualization of the school-society connection are examined.

Discourse and Society
SOCI.3693.A
Weeks, PeterM W04:00PM-05:20PM
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Discourse analysis is the study of language in use, and is thus distinguished from approaches that treat language formally and structurally, as an abstract system of signs and symbols. We examine instances of written and spoken language that occurs in a wide range of contexts, including: everyday conversations among friends, encounters between professionals and clients, the activities of creating, disseminating and consuming mass-mediated texts, and governmental and corporate settings where policies are established, monitored and changed. Combining a theoretical and practical orientation, the course draws primarily on the work of sociologists, but also includes that done by scholars in disciplines such as sociolinguistics, psychology, anthropology, semiotics and literary studies. A basic premise of the course is that in our so-called information or knowledge-based global society, a critical awareness of discursive practices is becoming a prerequisite for democratic citizenship.

Senior Seminar
SOCI.4013.A
Hayes, MatthewT TH02:30PM-03:50PM
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The senior seminar is a one-semester course, required for a Major degree in sociology, which is to be taken in the final year of study. The course is organized around substantive issues, with different sections devoted to different topics. The issues are addressed as puzzles or lines of inquiry that explore current concerns. Students are expected to bring the knowledge they have acquired of the competing traditions of sociological inquiry to bear on the theme. This course will be conducted as a seminar, with students taking responsibility for researching, presenting, and discussing material. Regular attendance and active participation will be emphasized. Enrolment limited to approximately 15 students in each section.

Senior Seminar
SOCI.4013.B
Caliskan, GulhanimTH02:30PM-05:20PM
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The senior seminar is a one-semester course, required for a Major degree in sociology, which is to be taken in the final year of study. The course is organized around substantive issues, with different sections devoted to different topics. The issues are addressed as puzzles or lines of inquiry that explore current concerns. Students are expected to bring the knowledge they have acquired of the competing traditions of sociological inquiry to bear on the theme. This course will be conducted as a seminar, with students taking responsibility for researching, presenting, and discussing material. Regular attendance and active participation will be emphasized. Enrolment limited to approximately 15 students in each section.

Honours Workshop
SOCI.4023.A
Machum, SusanT02:30PM-05:20PM
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This is a required course for Honours students in their final year. Enrolment is restricted to Honours students. The course is organized around two sets of activities: 1) workshops oriented to the development of knowledge and skills directly applicable to the process of thesis research, covering such topics as ethical decision-making in social research, practical problems in collecting and analyzing research material, writing in social research and 2) student presentations of thesis proposals, progress reports, and final results. Entry of non-Sociology students is with permission of instructor.

Advanced Sociological Theory
SOCI.4033.A
Kelly, ColmM W02:30PM-03:50PM
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A critical examination of selected orientations from contemporary sociological theory. The implications of these perspectives for both the nature of sociological inquiry and the prevailing models of society are considered. Prerequisites: SOCI 2033 and 3023.

Winter Semester 2018

CourseInstrDaysTime
Introduction to Sociology
SOCI.1006.A2
Allain, KristiM W F10:30AM-11:20AM
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

Introduction to Sociology
SOCI.1006.B2
Fredericks, ErinM W F11:30AM-12:20PM
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

Introduction to Sociology
SOCI.1006.C2
Allain, KristiM W F12:30PM-01:20PM
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

Introduction to Sociology
SOCI.1006.D2
Luke, AlisonM W02:30PM-03:50PM
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

Introduction to Sociology
SOCI.1006.E2
Caliskan, GulhanimT TH10:00AM-11:20AM
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

Introduction to Sociology
SOCI.1006.F2
McCoy, RobertT TH11:30AM-12:50PM
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

Research Design
SOCI.2013.B
Luke, AlisonM W F12:30PM-01:20PM
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An introduction to the main research approaches used in sociology. The course includes practical experience in developing a research program by considering research question development, research design, methods of data collection, research ethics and data analysis. Of particular interest are the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches.

Sociology of Atlantic Canada
SOCI.2116.A2
Curtis Maillet, DonnaW F09:00AM-10:20AM
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This course is designed as an introduction to the sociological study of Atlantic Canada. The first term focuses on the development of the Maritimes and Newfoundland from mercantile societies to under-developed regions within the centralized Canadian economy. The second term focuses on the contemporary structure, problems, and issues of Atlantic Canadian society.

Sociology of Globalization
SOCI.2123.A
Caliskan, GulhanimT TH02:30PM-03:50PM
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Introduction to Sociology of Globalization explores social conditions characterized by global economic, political, cultural, and environmental interconnections and flows that cross existing political borders. Therefore, it challenges our existing conceptualization of an international world of borders and nation states. The course explores the concept of globalization and its relevance to our lives. Types of empirical topics covered include contemporary global inequalities; environmental problems; transnational communities and families; transnational migration; the effect of globalization on gender, race, ethnicity, and religion; transnational social movements; and the women's movement. Prerequisites: SOCI-1006. Introduction to Sociology or instructor's permission.

Deviance
SOCI.2313.B
Hersey, CorinneT TH08:30AM-09:50AM
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This course reviews theory and research with a focus on the social basis of deviance, deviance construction, and the consequences of social reactions to selected forms of deviance.

Sociology of Chinese Women
SOCI.2333.A
Reimer, MarileeT TH01:00PM-02:20PM
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This course explores the sociology of women and China in recent literature and film, particularly in recent work by women in China and of those Chinese origins in Western countries. Topics include 20th century migration, settlement and early family experiences. The novels focus on three generations of families and illustrate the traditional expectations for women within China and in North America. The films include recent works by Chinese filmmakers that comment on women's place in pre-revolutionary and modern society.

Inequality in Society
SOCI.2416.A2
Fleming, MichaelT TH08:30AM-09:50AM
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This course explores existing patterns of social inequality and debates concerning the possibility and desirability of greater equality. Taking a theoretical and historical focus, this course examines the changing nature of inequality in contemporary Canadian society in the context of globalization. Throughout, we develop our understanding of how different forms of inequality - particularly social class, gender and race - intersect. One section of the course may have a service learning requirement, where students engage in volunteer work in the community, and then reflect upon their experiences through reading, writing, and discussion.

Sociology of Communication
SOCI.2513.A
Campbell, MargaretM W F10:30AM-11:20AM
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This course considers the mass media, (principally print and electronic), its place in, and impact upon Canadian society. Various perspectives and related research are considered with respect to the control and ownership of the media, the social organization of the production of news, facts, statistics, and other messages; and the themes expressed in popular culture as conveyed by the media. Underlying concerns are the social construction of what-is-taken-to-be reality and the language that is used in the conveying of messages.

Sociology of Gender
SOCI.2613.A
Fredericks, ErinM W02:30PM-03:50PM
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This course focuses on particular aspects of the social processes that shape, and are shaped by female and male social roles such as gender and power, gender and social structures of work, and feminist social movements.

Political Economy of Women
SOCI.2643.A
Solati, FaribaT TH11:30AM-12:50PM
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This is a seminar course examining selected topics on the political economy of women. Potential topics include women as paid workers, domestic labour, and women and poverty.

Sociology of Health
SOCI.2653.A
Hersey, CorinneT TH11:30AM-12:50PM
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This course provides an introduction to sociology of health and illness. We will analyze the social construction of medical knowledge, the dominant mode of understanding health and illness in our society; experiences of health and illness; the social foundations of health inequalities-how and why patterns of health, illness and mortality reflect class, gender, sexuality, racial and ethnic divisions; the formal institutions that define and manage health and health care; and the consequences of medicalization. Prerequisite: SOCI-1006. Introduction to Sociology.

Contemporary Soci. Theory
SOCI.3023.A
Kelly, ColmT TH04:00PM-05:20PM
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A study of contemporary developments in sociological theory, focusing on major trends, their interrelationships, and controversies. Prerequisite: SOCI 2033.

Contemporary Soci. Theory
SOCI.3023.B
Kelly, ColmT TH10:00AM-11:20AM
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A study of contemporary developments in sociological theory, focusing on major trends, their interrelationships, and controversies. Prerequisite: SOCI 2033.

Research Strategies
SOCI.3033.A
Kelly, ColmW F09:00AM-10:20AM
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This course helps students learn what original research entails from its initial conception to its completion. It highlights the techniques and strategies successful researchers use to develop their research questions; select an appropriate research design and data collection method(s); meet university research ethics requirements; ensure the research is socially relevant and completed in a timely manner. Students are expected to design a research project and write a proposal outlining their plans. This exercise allows students to gain an appreciation of the research design process and the components of research. For some students the proposal will be the initial work towards an honours thesis; for others it will be a model for the preparation and planning of research in other courses or outside academia. After taking the course students should feel prepared to undertake research projects in any academic, government, research, or policy setting.

Sociology of Law
SOCI.3313.A
Sanford, StephanieT07:00PM-09:50PM
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This course critically examines law from various sociological perspectives, with particular reference to Canada. The course is designed to cover sociological jurisprudence and selected theories of law, as they relate to family, administrative, labour, criminal and other types of law. Prerequisite: SOCI 2313.

Sociology of Knowledge
SOCI.3523.A
Reimer, MarileeW F09:00AM-10:20AM
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This course is concerned with the social organization of knowledge. The focus is on the political and social processes and contexts in which local and ruling forms of knowledge are produced. For the purposes of this course, knowledge may range from common sense and popular culture to ideology, science, and information. Topics may include the connection between knowledge and power and how they are controlled by states, corporations, and professions, and the implications of the nature and distribution of print and electronic information. This course combines discussion of major theorists with an examination of current issues.

Sociology of Music
SOCI.3563.A
Weeks, PeterM W04:00PM-05:20PM
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This course combines a number of macro- and micro-sociological perspectives on music. The former refers to the wider socio-cultural context in which music is produced, distributed, and listened to. It includes the social functions and uses of music ranging from rituals and ceremonies to its political-economic organization in cultural industries. Forms of music, such as the functional harmony vs. the Afro-American traditons, area related to forms of society. Micro perspectives analyze how performers create and make music together in terms of the interaction among musicians, audience, and conductor. The practices of improvisation and maintaining synchrony will be examined principally in both classical and jazz contexts. Prerequisite: permission of the course instructor or the Director of the Centre for Musical Arts, UNB.

Special Topics: Exercise
SOCI.3723.A
Allain, KristiM W02:30PM-03:50PM
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The content of this course changes from year to year to reflect the special strengths of faculty and particular needs of students.

Senior Seminar
SOCI.4013.C
Hersey, CorinneT02:30PM-05:20PM
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The senior seminar is a one-semester course, required for a Major degree in sociology, which is to be taken in the final year of study. The course is organized around substantive issues, with different sections devoted to different topics. The issues are addressed as puzzles or lines of inquiry that explore current concerns. Students are expected to bring the knowledge they have acquired of the competing traditions of sociological inquiry to bear on the theme. This course will be conducted as a seminar, with students taking responsibility for researching, presenting, and discussing material. Regular attendance and active participation will be emphasized. Enrolment limited to approximately 15 students in each section.

Last Published: Sun Oct 22 06:05:01 2017