Semester 1 Course Offerings

Generated: Sun Dec 17 06:00:20 2017

SYNCourseInstrDaysTimeLoc
3088ANTH.1013.A
Intro to Cultural Anthropology
Hutton, KarenT TH08:30AM-09:50AMGMH.207
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This is an introduction to the study of contemporary cultures and languages and to the methods of ethnographic fieldwork.

2437ANTH.1013.B
Intro to Cultural Anthropology
Dallos, CsillaM W F12:30PM-01:20PMECH.103
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This is an introduction to the study of contemporary cultures and languages and to the methods of ethnographic fieldwork.

2438ANTH.1013.C
Intro to Cultural Anthropology
Toner, PeterT TH01:00PM-02:20PMECH.120
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This is an introduction to the study of contemporary cultures and languages and to the methods of ethnographic fieldwork.

2439ANTH.1023.A
Intro to Physical Anthr.
McLaughlin, MoiraT TH08:30AM-09:50AMECH.120
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An introduction to the study of humans as a biocultural species. The focus of this course is on human evolution, human variation and genetics, nonhuman primates, and the work of physical anthropologists.

2443ANTH.2063.A
North America
Votour, BradleyT TH04:00PM-05:20PMECH.103
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Ethnographic and ethnological study of the culture of North America. Prerequisite: ANTH 1013.

2444ANTH.2103.A
Southeast Asia
Dallos, CsillaM W F10:30AM-11:20AMECH.G11
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Ethnographic and ethnological study of the culture of Southeast Asia. Prerequisite: ANTH 1013.

2446ANTH.2333.A
World Archaeology
Mora, SantiagoM W F10:30AM-11:20AMECH.103
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This course will introduce students to past cultural expressions in different parts of the world. Following a general introduction to archaeological methods and techniques and the nature of archaeological record, this course will proceed to discuss multiple archaeological cases related to the ways of life of hunter-gatherers and complex societies - chiefdoms and states - as well as the rise and fall of these forms of social and political organization. Past cultural practices and the processes that give rise to cultural change will be examined in different locations around the globe. Prerequisite: None.

2449ANTH.2413.A
Human Biological Variation
McLaughlin, MoiraT TH11:30AM-12:50PMECH.120
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The course will examine visible human adaptations (e.g. differences in skin pigmentation) and invisible adaptations (e.g. thermal acclimatization, blood groups). An important component of the course will be anthropological demography, i.e. the study of population structure and cultural/historical influences on health and mortality. The format of the course will be a combination of in-class lab work/exercises and lectures. Not open to first-year students.

2451ANTH.2533.A
The Anthropology of Gender
Dallos, CsillaT TH11:30AM-12:50PMGMH.204
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This course examines male and female roles in a number of different cultural settings, especially non-Western societies. Particular attention is given to the cultural expectations of gender behaviour, the structure of economic opportunities for males and females, and how shifts in opportunity structures impact gender roles. Various examples illustrating the roles of males and females in the context of marriage, domestic group organization, economic decision making and political decision making, will be presented. Prerequisite: ANTH 1013.

2453ANTH.2623.A
Applied Anthropology
Votour, BradleyM W F11:30AM-12:20PMGMH.301
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This course distinguishes between applied and basic anthropological research and examines new career opportunities for anthropologists in such areas as public health, urban and community development, international development, human rights, education, and social services. Important ethical and policy considerations are reviewed within the context of the profession of applied anthropology. Prerequisite: ANTH 1013.

2455ANTH.2633.A
Anthropology of Music & Sound
Toner, PeterT TH10:00AM-11:20AMJDH.G6
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The aim of this course is to examine a range of key issues in ethnomusicology, from the classic works of the discipline to contemporary theories and approaches, and including aesthetic systems, the representation of music, music and cultural change, and the musical articulation of social identity. The course will not only offer an insight into musical diversity in cultures around the world, but will also develop the fundamental view that music both expresses and actively constructs social and cultural realities.

2428ANTH.3806.A1
Readings in Anth. Theory
Mora, SantiagoM W F12:30PM-01:20PMECH.124
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This course is an intensive reading and seminar discussion on selected recent anthropological theories. Students will read and analyze original works from the second half of the 20th century to the present in an attempt to evaluate their explanatory value and their consequences in the development of anthropology as an academic discipline. Prerequisite: ANTH 1013 and one area ethnography course. Anthropology majors must take this course in their third year of study.

2459ANTH.3913.A
Research Methods
Proulx, CraigT TH08:30AM-09:50AMECH.124
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There are two main goals in this course. The primary one is to familiarize students with some of the basic research methods that anthropologists use to construct ethnographic case studies. In the course, the student will gain experience in gathering, recording, interpreting, and presenting qualitative research material. At the same time, we will consider the close relationship between data collection and ethnographic writing. In relation to the latter, students will carry out exercises designed to aid them in developing a clear and concise style of both more formal writing and less formal note taking. The overall goal of the class will be to learn to collect, analyze, and clearly present ethnographic data. Prerequisite: ANTH 1013 and one area ethnography course. Anthropology majors must take this course in their third year of study.

2460ANTH.4443.A
Applied Forensic Anthropology
McLaughlin, MoiraT TH02:30PM-03:50PMECH.234
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The focus of this course is the analysis of specific cases in forensic anthropology, demonstrating how the various components of the law enforcement agencies become involved, and at what stage. The class will analyze the skeletal material associated with each case and do background research as a means of solving the case. The format of the course will be mainly in-class lab work accompanied by extensive research and off-campus visits. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: ANTH 3443 and permission of the instructor.

2915AQGB.EN1006.A1
Introduction to Literature
Wilkie, RodgerT TH02:30PM-03:50PMHCH.5
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An introduction to the range and variety of literature in English, to the practice of critical reading, and to writing about ideas and texts in conventional academic language and forms. The course concentrates on the central genres of literature.

2918AQGB.PH1006.A1
Intro to Western Philosophy
Hall, AlanT TH01:00PM-02:20PMHCH.5
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An introduction, through lecture, reading of original sources, and discussion, to the origins and development of western philosophy. The first part of the course studies this tradition from its beginnings in ancient Greece through the Christian Middle Ages. Authors read include Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, and St. Thomas Aquinas. Themes include the nature of reality, the nature of human being and human knowledge; moral and political philosophy; the existence and nature of God. The latter part of the course continues the survey of developments in western philosophy, from the early modern period to contemporary discussion. The focus is on rationalism, empiricism, idealism, and the reactions these provoked.

2943AQGH.EN1006.A1
Intro to Literature
Ball, HilaryT TH10:00AM-11:20AMMMH.202
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Intro to Literature

2945AQGH.HR1006.A1
Intro to Human Rights
Dinan, MatthewT TH01:00PM-02:20PMMMH.202
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Intro to Human Rights

2948AQGH.PO1006.A1
Intro to Political Science
Kinney, RossT TH02:30PM-03:50PMMMH.202
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Intro to Political Science

3049BIOL.1503.A
Principles of Biology I
Langmaid, WilfredT TH04:00PM-05:20PMBMH.102
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[IV. Scientific and Mathematical]This course introduces students to the study of life. Topics include the scientific method, biological molecules, cell structure and function, energy flow, respiration, and photosynthesis.

2575BUSI.2013.A
Introduction to Business
Critchley, KenM W04:00PM-05:20PMMMH.308
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The course introduces a range of business topics with an emphasis on business practices in the Canadian context. Topics include entrepreneurship, financial process, marketing, socially responsible business, management, human resources, and the role of business in the Canadian economy. In addition, broader issues, such as business ethics and relations between employees and employers will be discussed.

2574BUSI.3013.A
Personal Financial Planning
Sheppard, LarryT TH04:00PM-05:20PMJDH.G2
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The course introduces techniques of personal financial planning, which will be of value for both personal and professional use. Topics include planning strategies, managing credit and debt, time value of money, personal income tax, risk management and insurance, investment basics, retirement planning, and the development personal financial plans.

3059CATH.2203.A
Global Catholicism
Daley, ShawnT TH05:30PM-06:50PMBMH.102
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This course surveys the history, theology, ecclesiology, and practice of Catholicism outside of the European church. It will examine the differences between Asian, African, and Latin American theology, the evolving theology of mission in the Church, and the insights non-European Catholicism can provide for inter-religious dialogue, ecumenism, and understanding secularism. Attention will be paid to the historical role of the Catholic Church in European colonization, the distinctions between colonized and un-colonized Catholicism, and how encounters with non-European indigenous cultures has influenced Roman Catholic theology and practice. Prerequisites: none.

2550COPP.1013.A
Intro. to Communications
Gillies, JamesT TH10:00AM-11:20AMMMH.308
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]This course introduces students to the history and evolution of the communications profession, with particular emphasis on communications in the public policy sphere, from the pioneers who sold ideas on behalf of their clients, to the modern world of two-way communications with the public through the internet and social media tools. The course will explore how this evolution is changing the way governments, politicians, non-governmental organizations, citizens groups and corporations interact with the public.

2555COPP.1013.B
Intro. to Communications
Gillies, JamesW F09:00AM-10:20AMMMH.308
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]This course introduces students to the history and evolution of the communications profession, with particular emphasis on communications in the public policy sphere, from the pioneers who sold ideas on behalf of their clients, to the modern world of two-way communications with the public through the internet and social media tools. The course will explore how this evolution is changing the way governments, politicians, non-governmental organizations, citizens groups and corporations interact with the public.

2558COPP.2013.A
Fundamentals of Writing
Tunney, MarkM W02:30PM-03:50PMMMH.307
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]Communicating public policy requires clear and effective writing at every stage in the process. This is a foundational writing course that will help students learn to express themselves in clear, compelling language. Prerequisites: COPP 1013, COPP 1023.

3048COPP.2023.A
Policy Making in the Info Age
McHardie, DanielT TH04:00PM-05:20PMMMH.202
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]This course will explore how social media and internet tools are transforming the world of communications and public policy. The course will explore cases around the world where social media and the access to information on the internet is influencing public policy and the political process. Prerequisite: COPP 2013.

2561COPP.3043.A
Business Commun. and Marketing
MacLean, Heather-AnneM07:00PM-09:50PMMMH.308
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[2. Communications and Public Policy] This course explores the role of communications in business settings, including professional writing, the power of narrative, the influence of social media, and the connection between communications and marketing.

3053COPP.4006.A1
Case Studies in Public Policy
Gillies, JamesT02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.307
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]The capstone case study course will require students to spend the fall semester surveying scholarly literature on public policy analysis (regarding policy development, design and implementation) and the winter semester applying this research as they write two case studies that will require students to synthesize the issues encountered in their Focus Areas with their studies in Communications. Course work can be presented in English and French. Prerequisites: COPP 3013, COPP 3023, COPP 3033.

2526COPP.4016.A1
Internship
Dickson, DonaldTH07:00PM-09:50PMCBC.CBC
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]Students will complete two supervised professional unpaid internships in a professional communications agency, non-profit organization, or government office and will complete a detailed exit report. Where possible, students will have the opportunity to pursue internships that require them to work in French or in a bilingual office. Prerequisites: COPP 3013, COPP 3023, COPP 3033.

2489CRIM.1013.A
Introduction to Criminology
Clifford, JamesM07:00PM-09:50PMBMH.102
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the discipline of criminology: its origins, the nature of disciplinary debates, and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves an examination of crime patterns, causes of criminal behaviour and crime prevention strategies. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upper-level courses.

2511CRIM.1013.B
Introduction to Criminology
Pidwysocky, StephenT TH10:00AM-11:20AMBMH.101
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the discipline of criminology: its origins, the nature of disciplinary debates, and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves an examination of crime patterns, causes of criminal behaviour and crime prevention strategies. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upper-level courses.

2494CRIM.1023.A
Intro. to Criminal Justice
Sauvageau, JeanM W04:00PM-05:20PMMMH.203
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the role criminology plays in both formulating and critiquing criminal justice policy and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves a critical look at the nature of the criminal justice system, the role of the state and the creation of policies through the passing of bills, legislation, and statutes pertinent to the interpretation of the Criminal Code. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upperlevel courses.

2495CRIM.1023.B
Intro. to Criminal Justice
Sauvageau, JeanT TH02:30PM-03:50PMBMH.102
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the role criminology plays in both formulating and critiquing criminal justice policy and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves a critical look at the nature of the criminal justice system, the role of the state and the creation of policies through the passing of bills, legislation, and statutes pertinent to the interpretation of the Criminal Code. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upperlevel courses.

2505CRIM.1023.C
Intro. to Criminal Justice
Goggin, ClaireT TH08:30AM-09:50AMBMH.102
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the role criminology plays in both formulating and critiquing criminal justice policy and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves a critical look at the nature of the criminal justice system, the role of the state and the creation of policies through the passing of bills, legislation, and statutes pertinent to the interpretation of the Criminal Code. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upperlevel courses.

2517CRIM.1023.D
Intro. to Criminal Justice
O'Regan, KarlaW F09:00AM-10:20AMBMH.202
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the role criminology plays in both formulating and critiquing criminal justice policy and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves a critical look at the nature of the criminal justice system, the role of the state and the creation of policies through the passing of bills, legislation, and statutes pertinent to the interpretation of the Criminal Code. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upperlevel courses.

2518CRIM.1023.E
Intro. to Criminal Justice
Reid, SusanT TH11:30AM-12:50PMBMH.101
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the role criminology plays in both formulating and critiquing criminal justice policy and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves a critical look at the nature of the criminal justice system, the role of the state and the creation of policies through the passing of bills, legislation, and statutes pertinent to the interpretation of the Criminal Code. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upperlevel courses.

2519CRIM.2103.A
Intro. to Qual. Research Meth.
Pidwysocky, StephenM W F11:30AM-12:20PMBMH.101
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The purpose of this course is to introduce students to qualitative research methods. Students will learn the theoretical and epistemological foundations of qualitative methods and explore a number of data collection methods inherent to qualitative research, as well as critically evaluate and make appropriate use of secondary information sources. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2508CRIM.2113.A
Quantitative Research Methods
Goggin, ClaireT TH01:00PM-02:20PMBMH.103
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This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to social science research methods and statistics as they apply to criminology and criminal justice issues. It aims to help students understand the fundamentals of the scientific method, including research design, sampling methodologies, measurement strategies, statistics, and data collection techniques, while assisting them in the development of the necessary critical thinking skills to critique and evaluate criminal justice research. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2520CRIM.2123.A
Criminal Law
O'Regan, KarlaM W F10:30AM-11:20AMMMH.203
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This course provides an introduction to criminal law - what it is, how it came into being, and the various elements of offences and forms of defence within Canada's criminal law system. Possible topics include: sources of criminal law in Canada; duty to act; voluntariness; negligent homicide; causation; strict and absolute liability; attempts; and a variety of criminal defences, including mental disorder, mistake of fact, consent, provocation, and necessity. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2521CRIM.2223.A
Youth Justice
Reid, SusanT TH02:30PM-03:50PMBMH.103
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This course will examine theories of juvenile delinquency in historical and contemporary perspectives. A review of Canadian legislation concerning young offenders will be done to illuminate the official response to juvenile delinquency in light of the theories noted above. Special attention will be given to the Young Offenders Act, juvenile justice in Canada, the disposition of young offenders, and the rights of young adults. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2503CRIM.2243.A
Corrections
Goggin, ClaireW F09:00AM-10:20AMBMH.102
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This course will provide a comprehensive review of the theories and history of corrections together with their implementation in Canada. Particular attention will be devoted to contemporary issues such as the trend from incarceration to community-based treatment, the diversion of young offenders, and electronic surveillance. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2490CRIM.2253.A
Crime & Society in Hist. Per.
McCormick, ChristopherM W F10:30AM-11:20AMBMH.103
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This course examines how definitions of crime and the criminal have changed over time in Canada, and how the criminal justice system has dealt with crime and criminals. The course will also highlight the role that the State, criminal justice officials, and the media have played in defining crime and the criminal. From arson to zealots, the emphasis is on an examination of class, race, age, and gender as relations of power. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2496CRIM.2943.A
Victimology
Thomas, BrendaT TH08:30AM-09:50AMBMH.202
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This course will examine this specialized field of criminology which is related to the study of victims of crime and factors connected to the victim. A historical perspective on the study of victimology, theories related to the explanation of victimization, the modern evolution of victim rights, and the development of victim services will be examined. Specific victim groups, provincial and federal legislation related to victims, the United Nations Charter of Victims Rights will be addressed, as well as the delivery of services to victims involved in the criminal justice system. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2522CRIM.3003.A
Special Topics in Crim & Crjs
Savarese, JosephineM07:00PM-09:50PMJDH.G1
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This course consists of an in-depth analysis of a specific topic in the field of criminology or criminal justice. The purpose is to provide a more detailed analysis of the topic by integrating theoretical and research applications. The course will be organized around the special interests of full time and visiting faculty to capitalize on the research and theoretical interests of the Department complement. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2491CRIM.3013.A
Contemporary Crim. Theory
McCormick, ChristopherM W F11:30AM-12:20PMBMH.103
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This course will introduce students to 20th century criminological theories such as the Chicago School, strain theory, differential association theory, labelling theory, and critical criminology. The student's knowledge of classical, positive, and critical criminology will be applied to issues of social control and crime reduction. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2516CRIM.3143.A
Charter Rights
Savarese, JosephineW07:00PM-09:50PMBMH.102
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This course is an advanced look at the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Particular attention will be devoted to the effects of the Charter on criminal law making and its enforcement with reference to specific examples such as abortion, obscenity, pornography, capital punishment, unreasonable search and seizure, and pre-trial and detention rights. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2487CRIM.3273.A
Crime in Popular Film
Clarke, DawneW02:30PM-05:20PMBMH.102
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This course will explore popular and primarily American film from a criminological perspective, paying particular attention to how we understand crime through film. Such themes as what is a crime film?, criminology in crime films, police films, court room films, and prison films will be explored. At the conclusion of this course, students should be able to critically evaluate film and the relationships between crime and society portrayed through popular film. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2492CRIM.3503.A
Wrongful Conviction!
McCormick, ChristopherT TH02:30PM-03:50PMMMH.203
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Wrongful convictions undermine the legitimacy premise that accused persons are innocent until proven guilty under the law. This course focuses on reasons and factors contributing to wrongful convictions: eyewitness identification, jailhouse informants; and looks at outcomes and legislations that have been enacted to prevent and remedy these legal/social injustices. This course explores how police, expert witnesses, prosecutors, defence lawyers, juries, trial judges and defendants contribute to wrongful convictions; and how that can be remedied. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2493CRIM.3643.A
Terrorism: An Introduction
Clifford, JamesT07:00PM-09:50PMBMH.102
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This course provides a survey of issues related to terrorism and global conflict wherein students will be able to discuss social, political, economic and cultural roots of terrorism. In particular, this course will develop an appreciation of the complex motivations producing terrorism, as well as the unusual character and significant trade-offs that are induced by governments to minimize the impact of terrorism. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2488CRIM.3843.A
Corporate Crime and Regulation
Fleming, MichaelT TH11:30AM-12:50PMGMH.205
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This course will provide an overview and critical analysis of corporate crime and its regulation in Canada. The course will examine: the problems of definition of corporate crime; the images, measurement and victims of such crime; the types of corporate crime; theories and perspectives on the etiology of corporate criminality and corporate crime; the origins of the laws against corporate crime and contemporary legislative lawmaking in this field; the effectiveness of policing and regulation of corporate crime; and various reforms proposed to deal with such crimes in the future. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023

2523CRIM.3953.A
Peacemaking Crim&Restora.Just
Pidwysocky, StephenM W F01:30PM-02:20PMBMH.101
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This course critically examines the philosophical, spiritual, and sociological bases of peacemaking criminology and restorative justice theory and practice. Also discussed will be particular restorative justice initiatives and other alternatives to the current retributive criminal justice model. Students who have already completed CRIM 4123 are not eligible to take CRIM 3953 for credit.

3085CRIM.4003.A
Spec.Top.:Human Trafficking
Winterdyk, JohnT TH01:00PM-02:20PMMMH.106
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This course consists of an in-depth analysis of a specific topic in the field of criminology or criminal justice. The purpose is to provide a more detailed analysis of the topic by integrating theoretical and research applications. The course will be organized around the special interests of full time and visiting faculty to capitalize on the research and theoretical interests of the Department complement. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and CRIM 1023.

2485CRIM.4006.A1
Honours Research Seminar
Savarese, JosephineT TH02:30PM-03:50PMGMH.204
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This course provides a collaborative work forum for those students who have been formally accepted into the Honours Programme. The course has two components. The first is a series of special topics taught by faculty on such issues as professional ethics, special topics in theory and methods, writing a research report, and passing ethics review. In addition, a number of thesis related assignments will guide the student through the research process: preparing a formal bibliography, research proposal with research design, and a peer presentation on their proposed research. Prerequisite: CRIM 2253 and formal acceptance into the Honours program.

2500CRJS.3003.A
Govt & the Crim Justice System
Thomas, BrendaT TH10:00AM-11:20AMBMH.102
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This course is an in-depth analysis of policy issues related to policing, courts, and corrections. Through an analysis of contemporary issues facing the criminal justice system in Canada, students will examine the links between the police, politics, law, and the administration of justice. Further, students will explore the roles and responsibilities of various government departments and agencies, non-government agencies, and community organizations affiliated directly and indirectly with the criminal justice system to gain a greater understanding of how to access resources and services for persons affected by the criminal justice system. This is a required course for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Applied Arts in Criminal Justice but is open to students in Criminology. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023, Registration: BAACJ or permission of the instructor.

2408ECON.1013.A
Intro to Economics (Micro)
Gupta, SatyadevT TH11:30AM-12:50PMECH.G11
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[1. Economics Courses]This course, which is equivalent to one half of ECON 1006, examines the behaviour of consumers and producers in a market economy. Among the issues discussed will be environmental protection, wealth and poverty, and the extent of corporate power.(Credit will not be given for both ECON 1006 and ECON 1013.)

2413ECON.1013.B
Intro to Economics (Micro)
Gupta, SatyadevT TH02:30PM-03:50PMECH.G12
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[1. Economics Courses]This course, which is equivalent to one half of ECON 1006, examines the behaviour of consumers and producers in a market economy. Among the issues discussed will be environmental protection, wealth and poverty, and the extent of corporate power.(Credit will not be given for both ECON 1006 and ECON 1013.)

2416ECON.1023.A
Intro to Economics (Macro)
Solati, FaribaM W F11:30AM-12:20PMECH.103
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[1. Economics Courses]This course, which is equivalent to one half of ECON 1006, analyzes the Canadian economy and how it works. It includes a discussion of output, unemployment, growth, money, international trade, and finance. (Credit will not be given for both ECON 1006 and ECON 1023.)

2417ECON.2103.A
Microeconomic Theory I
Rhinelander, JasonM W02:30PM-03:50PMGMH.205
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[1. Economics Courses]A theory course which develops the basic techniques of microeconomic analysis. Topics will include theories of consumer demand, production costs, the behaviour of producers under different market conditions, and the functioning of commodity markets.

2420ECON.2153.A
Political Economy
Solati, FaribaM W F01:30PM-02:20PMECH.103
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[1. Economics Courses]A theory course analyzing economic activities in their political and social context. Topics include: class and economic power, the labour process and the generation of surplus, economic instability, capitalism on a world scale, and the nature and role of government.

2478ECON.2203.A
Community Econ Development
McFarland, JoanW07:00PM-09:50PMECH.223
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[1. Economics Courses]A course which explores the theory and practice of community economic development. It will include the examination of case studies of successful community economic development. The focus will be on the appropriateness and applicability of the model to the Maritimes.

2435ECON.2213.A
Contemporary Issues
Solati, FaribaT TH10:00AM-11:30AMMMH.106
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[1. Economics Courses]This is a course in economic policy analysis. The course will examine selected economic issues and analyze a range of policy responses.

2436ECON.3323.A
Environmental Economics
Olale, EdwardT TH05:30PM-06:50PMMMH.307
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[1. Economics Courses]An examination of the relationship between the ecological system, economics, and institutions. Topics covered may include such issues as technological choice, steady state economics, limits to growth, the adequacy of the market mechanism, world food supplies, the economics of conservation, and alternative futures.

3214EDUC.5015.A1
Field Placement
Levesque, Leo-James-TBA.TBA
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[5. Field Experience] The field placement consists of a minimum of fifteen weeks. There are four days of school visitation and two separate placements in a K-12 school setting. Placement is made by the School of Education in accordance with the policy in the St. Thomas University Calendar and the BEd Field Placement Handbook. All field placements will be conducted in the Province of New Brunswick.

3174EDUC.5163.A
Fren. Sec. Lang. Meth: Ms/Hs
Levesque, Leo-JamesM W08:30AM-10:20AMBMH.205
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[2. Middle and Secondary Majors and Electives|French Second Language] This course presents theories of second language acquisition, current trends in the field of second language teaching and learning, and their application to the teaching of French in a communicative and interactive approach at the middle and secondary levels. Students will develop lesson units, engage in peer-teaching, and integrate technology into their teaching. Students will participate in discussion, work with case studies, research issues in second language education using current professional journals and resources. Attention will be given to the teaching and assessing of listening, reading, writing, speaking and cultural understanding. This course aims to provide solid advice, information and guidance to French Second Language teachers so that they may help their students recognize that French is not only a means of communication but also a portal to future opportunities. Students are required to have a minimum proficiency of Intermediate Plus on the New Brunswick French Oral Proficiency scale to register for this course.

3167EDUC.5413.A1
Elem.School Reading&Lang. Arts
Ingersoll, MarceaTH01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.107
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[3. Elementary Majors] The course will focus on current approaches to reading and language arts instruction. This includes becoming aware of the influence of theories of reading and literacy. You will begin to lay the groundwork for your own effective language arts practice by designing and developing curriculum resources and materials for use in the classroom. You will be expected to review and utilize the New Brunswick Curriculum English Language Arts documents (found online) and your course notes and required texts in your planning and preparation of lessons and activities for this course. The spotlight is on reading and the processes of writing, listening, thinking and comprehension in the elementary classroom.

3169EDUC.5413.B1
Elem.School Reading&Lang. Arts
Ingersoll, MarceaT01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.107
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[3. Elementary Majors] The course will focus on current approaches to reading and language arts instruction. This includes becoming aware of the influence of theories of reading and literacy. You will begin to lay the groundwork for your own effective language arts practice by designing and developing curriculum resources and materials for use in the classroom. You will be expected to review and utilize the New Brunswick Curriculum English Language Arts documents (found online) and your course notes and required texts in your planning and preparation of lessons and activities for this course. The spotlight is on reading and the processes of writing, listening, thinking and comprehension in the elementary classroom.

3144EDUC.5423.A
Mdl Scl Literacy & la
Ingersoll, MarceaM W01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.107
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[2. Middle and Secondary Majors and Electives|Language Arts] This course continues the development of the pre-service teacher's knowledge base with regard to designing the language arts programme in the elementary and middle level. Topics include the comprehension and response to literature, content area reading, study skills, and making connections between reading and writing. This course provides a framework for the beginning teacher upon which to base logical reflective decisions concerning learning experiences, instructional techniques, and assessment strategies.

3163EDUC.5433.A1
Elem School Math Mtds
Wood, ShaundaT01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.205
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[3. Elementary Majors] Elementary mathematics is an introduction to the context and strategies of elementary mathematics (K-8). This course does not require a strong mathematics background. The emphasis will be on content as well as on doing mathematics. Students will be encouraged to be involved in problem solving and exploring mathematical concepts by developing ideas from the concrete to the abstract level, and by developing multiple representations of mathematical ideas. Content topics include pre-number concepts, numeration and place value, whole number operations, number theory, and geometry.

3165EDUC.5433.B1
Elem School Math Mtds
Wood, ShaundaTH01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.205
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[3. Elementary Majors] Elementary mathematics is an introduction to the context and strategies of elementary mathematics (K-8). This course does not require a strong mathematics background. The emphasis will be on content as well as on doing mathematics. Students will be encouraged to be involved in problem solving and exploring mathematical concepts by developing ideas from the concrete to the abstract level, and by developing multiple representations of mathematical ideas. Content topics include pre-number concepts, numeration and place value, whole number operations, number theory, and geometry.

3149EDUC.5443.A1
Art and Music Ed. in Elem
Hewson, AnneW01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.202
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[3. Elementary Majors] This modularized course will introduce two elements of the elementary major: art and music. Existing curricula in these fields will be examined; students will be given opportunities to plan and present lessons that meaningfully integrate art and music into other areas of the elementary curriculum.

3150EDUC.5443.B1
Art and Music Ed. in Elem
Hewson, AnneM01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.202
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[3. Elementary Majors] This modularized course will introduce two elements of the elementary major: art and music. Existing curricula in these fields will be examined; students will be given opportunities to plan and present lessons that meaningfully integrate art and music into other areas of the elementary curriculum.

3145EDUC.5473.A1
Science for Elem Children
Wood, ShaundaM01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.205
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[3. Elementary Majors] The nature and purpose of science education are explored. Effective use of minimal time allotted to this discipline at the elementary level is the main focus. One of the primary tasks to be undertaken is the construction of discovery-based learning centres as well as appropriate assessment tools. Students will be given the opportunity to experience the dynamics of constructivist science learning with a special emphasis to cross-curricular extensions including health. Time will be spent exploring student record keeping strategies which compliment a guided inquiry-based approach.

3147EDUC.5473.B1
Science for Elem Children
Wood, ShaundaW01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.205
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[3. Elementary Majors] The nature and purpose of science education are explored. Effective use of minimal time allotted to this discipline at the elementary level is the main focus. One of the primary tasks to be undertaken is the construction of discovery-based learning centres as well as appropriate assessment tools. Students will be given the opportunity to experience the dynamics of constructivist science learning with a special emphasis to cross-curricular extensions including health. Time will be spent exploring student record keeping strategies which compliment a guided inquiry-based approach.

3154EDUC.5613.A1
Methods in Elem Soc. Stud. Ed.
Murray, SharonTH08:30AM-10:20AMBMH.107
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[3. Elementary Majors] This course focuses on investigating elementary school (K-5) social studies teaching methods. The course intends to help pre-service teachers articulate a conception of social studies education and its goals. The main areas of social studies focus are geography, history, political science, and economics and the social aspects of health education. The course design assumes that all teachers strive to engage students in meaningful experiences that bridge the study of social studies concepts with the community of learners in the classroom.

3156EDUC.5613.B1
Methods in Elem Soc. Stud. Ed.
Murray, SharonT08:30AM-10:20AMBMH.107
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[3. Elementary Majors] This course focuses on investigating elementary school (K-5) social studies teaching methods. The course intends to help pre-service teachers articulate a conception of social studies education and its goals. The main areas of social studies focus are geography, history, political science, and economics and the social aspects of health education. The course design assumes that all teachers strive to engage students in meaningful experiences that bridge the study of social studies concepts with the community of learners in the classroom.

3162EDUC.5843.A
Methods in Social Studies
Murray, SharonT TH01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.202
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[2. Middle and Secondary Majors and Electives|Social Studies] This course is an introduction to instructional strategies and methods for teaching social studies. The course intends to help pre-service teachers integrate their knowledge of social studies with educational best practices. The areas of social studies focus are geography, history, political science, and economics.

3142EDUC.5863.A
Methods in Sci. Educ - 6-10
Williams, GrantM W10:30AM-12:20PMBMH.205
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[2. Middle and Secondary Majors and Electives|Math and Science] This course will focus on the Atlantic Canada Science Curriculum for grades 6 to 10. Through reading, discussion, practice, and reflection, course participants will develop the content mastery and pedagogical skills necessary to facilitate engaging, inquiry-based science lessons of the constructivist learning model for middle level and early high school students. Particular focus will be placed on the use of analogies, simulations and discrepant events in the development of explanatory models. A science background is an asset but is not essential.

3152EDUC.5873.A
Methods in Math Ed. Gr. 6-10
Williams, GrantT TH06:30PM-08:20PMBMH.107
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[2. Middle and Secondary Majors and Electives|Math and Science] This course will focus on the provincial mathematics curriculum for grades 6 to 10. Through reading, discussion, practice, and reflection, course participants will develop the content mastery and pedagogical skills necessary to facilitate engaging, student-centered math lessons for middle level and early high school students. Particular emphasis will be placed on the use of manipulatives and various models in the development of problem solving skills. A mathematics background is an asset but is not essential.

3143EDUC.5903.E
Classroom Management
Hewson, AnneM W10:30AM-12:20PMBMH.202
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[1. Core Courses|Pedagogical] Research has shown that classroom management strategies have a dramatic impact on the learning environment. Several very different schools of thought regarding classroom management are discussed. Emphasis is placed on course participants developing a personal proactive approach by extracting and merging effective strategies from many sources.

3151EDUC.5903.S
Classroom Management
Hewson, AnneM W03:30PM-05:20PMBMH.205
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[1. Core Courses|Pedagogical] Research has shown that classroom management strategies have a dramatic impact on the learning environment. Several very different schools of thought regarding classroom management are discussed. Emphasis is placed on course participants developing a personal proactive approach by extracting and merging effective strategies from many sources.

3161EDUC.5963.A
Law, Ethics and Prof. Conduct
Williams, RaymondT TH10:30AM-12:20PMBMH.202
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[1. Core Courses | Professional] This course is an examination of the role of the professional in a public school setting. It involves the study of teaching and the law, professional conduct and ethics, and the teacher's role as a member of a self-regulating profession. Topics addressed will include the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Canadian Constitution (focus on the Charter of Rights and Freedoms), New Brunswick Education Act & its Policies and Regulations, Family Services Act (pertinent educational sections), and the NBTA Code of Ethics. Students will also collaborate to research a variety of topics in case law.

3172EDUC.5963.B
Law, Ethics and Prof. Conduct
Williams, RaymondT TH03:30PM-05:20PMBMH.202
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[1. Core Courses | Professional] This course is an examination of the role of the professional in a public school setting. It involves the study of teaching and the law, professional conduct and ethics, and the teacher's role as a member of a self-regulating profession. Topics addressed will include the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Canadian Constitution (focus on the Charter of Rights and Freedoms), New Brunswick Education Act & its Policies and Regulations, Family Services Act (pertinent educational sections), and the NBTA Code of Ethics. Students will also collaborate to research a variety of topics in case law.

3171EDUC.5973.A
Integrating Tech in Classroom
Parks, ScottT TH04:00PM-05:50PMBMH.205
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[1. Core Courses | Professional] The intent of this course is to develop comprehensive skills, knowledge and understanding of current educational technologies. Opportunities for teams to integrate technology while developing basic technical skills will result in resources for teaching in a particular subject area. Individuals will also develop an electronic portfolio to showcase their professional growth and development.

3160EDUC.5973.B
Integrating Tech in Classroom
Murray, SharonT TH10:30AM-12:20PMBMH.205
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[1. Core Courses | Professional] The intent of this course is to develop comprehensive skills, knowledge and understanding of current educational technologies. Opportunities for teams to integrate technology while developing basic technical skills will result in resources for teaching in a particular subject area. Individuals will also develop an electronic portfolio to showcase their professional growth and development.

3173EDUC.5993.E
Exceptional& Differentiated Ed
Treadwell, ChrisT TH06:30PM-08:20PMBMH.205
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[1. Core Courses|Pedagogical] The course provides an overview of issues associated with specific student groups, including students with various exceptionalities and or academic abilities. This includes but is not exclusive to students with developmental or learning disabilities (as part of or in addition to an individualized program plan), students who are gifted, English Language learners, and students who are at risk for leaving high school before completion. Through a combination of the study of recent research and an examination of theory and differentiated practice within the New Brunswick school context, the course offers pre-service teacher opportunities to use curriculum-specific perspectives while co-constructing instructional and assessment strategies, for teaching all students.

3153EDUC.5993.S
Exceptional& Differentiated Ed
Godsoe-Daigle, KarenT TH08:30AM-10:20AMBMH.205
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[1. Core Courses|Pedagogical] The course provides an overview of issues associated with specific student groups, including students with various exceptionalities and or academic abilities. This includes but is not exclusive to students with developmental or learning disabilities (as part of or in addition to an individualized program plan), students who are gifted, English Language learners, and students who are at risk for leaving high school before completion. Through a combination of the study of recent research and an examination of theory and differentiated practice within the New Brunswick school context, the course offers pre-service teacher opportunities to use curriculum-specific perspectives while co-constructing instructional and assessment strategies, for teaching all students.

2665ENGL.1003.A
Introduction to Theatre
Ross, LisaT TH01:00PM-02:20PMECH.AUD
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to the role, practice, and study of theatre in society. Students are introduced to key concepts and material elements in the study and practice of theatre through exposure to dramatic and historical texts, acting techniques, the technical elements of theatre, and local theatre attendance and reflection. The course is a hybrid lecture/studio course, and open to all students.

2606ENGL.1016.A1
English Literatures
Morgan, DawnT TH08:30AM-09:50AMECH.G12
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

2609ENGL.1016.B1
English Literatures
Robinson, MatthewM W F10:30AM-11:20AMGMH.304
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

2619ENGL.1016.C1
English Literatures
McKim, ElizabethT TH11:30AM-12:50PMJDH.G6
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

2623ENGL.1016.D1
English Literatures
Tremblay, AnthonyT TH01:00PM-02:20PMGMH.207
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

2626ENGL.1016.E1
English Literatures
McConnell, KathleenM W F11:30AM-12:20PMECH.G12
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

2631ENGL.1016.F1
English Literatures
Desroches, DennisM W02:30PM-03:50PMJDH.205
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

2635ENGL.1016.G1
English Literatures
Allen, EllaT TH02:30PM-03:50PMGMH.207
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

2662ENGL.2013.A
Research Methods in English
Morgan, DawnT TH11:30AM-12:50PMGMH.301
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[2. Intermediate Course ] An introduction to the discipline and practice of English; specifically, the use of research and scholarly sources in academic writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 1006.

2663ENGL.2013.B
Research Methods in English
Robinson, MatthewM W02:30PM-03:50PMECH.103
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[2. Intermediate Course ] An introduction to the discipline and practice of English; specifically, the use of research and scholarly sources in academic writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 1006.

2664ENGL.2013.C
Research Methods in English
McKim, ElizabethM W04:00PM-05:20PMJDH.G6
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[2. Intermediate Course ] An introduction to the discipline and practice of English; specifically, the use of research and scholarly sources in academic writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 1006.

2661ENGL.2123.A
Creative Writing: Strategies
McConnell, KathleenW F09:00AM-10:20AMECH.G12
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[2. Intermediate Course ] A course for students interested in writing poetry, prose, and/or scripts. Along with writing assignments and workshopping (critiquing each others' work), students give presentations or blog on topics that will help them understand current issues relevant to writers. This course is also open to first-year students. Prerequisite: 5-10 page sample of work submitted to the instructor at least a week before registration, or ENGL 2113.

2659ENGL.2213.A
Acting & Theatre Prod. I
Ross, LisaT07:00PM-09:50PMECH.AUD
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[2. Intermediate Course ] An initial exploration of the fundamental elements that combine to create theatre. Through improvisations, exercises, monologues, and scenes, students learn the techniques of acting and stagecraft to develop their awareness of the process of performance. Enrolment is restricted to those who have received permission of the instructor. This course is also open to first-year students.

2657ENGL.2613.A
History of Children's Lit.
Fraser, LouiseT TH08:30AM-09:50AMGMH.304
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[2. Intermediate Course ] An investigation of the history of children's literature, this course uses the resources of UNB's Children's Literature Collection to explore the development of literature for children.

2656ENGL.2713.A
Shakespeare
Smith, LeslieTH04:00PM-06:50PMMMH.203
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[2. Intermediate Course ] A study of a selection of Shakespeare's works and his legacy. (Pre-1800.)

2654ENGL.2723.A
Fiction,Drama & Film
Donovan, StewartT04:00PM-06:50PMBMH.101
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[2. Intermediate Course ] A study of novels, short fiction, drama, and film as narrative. Students are introduced to, among other things, the major narrative techniques and innovations in the history of cinema. (Post-1800.)

2653ENGL.2803.A
Contemporary Theory I
Desroches, DennisT TH01:00PM-02:20PMJDH.G2
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[2. Intermediate Course ] The primary concern of this course is to familiarize students with the social, political, cultural, and philosophical presuppositions of theoretical inquiry into literary texts. We shall begin by focusing on introductory commentaries and shall proceed from there to examine certain primary theoretical texts in their specific relation to literary examples. (Post-1800; Language.)

2652ENGL.3153.A
Literary Publishing
Humble, LinnetT TH04:00PM-05:20PMECH.223
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[3. Advanced Course] This course will provide students with an understanding of the current, evolving state of literary publishing in Canada. Topics can range from proposal and manuscript submission to the production, marketing, and distribution of print and electronic books. The role of publishing within wider literary culture will also be considered. Prerequisite: ENGL 2113 or 2123, or permission of the instructor.

2651ENGL.3213.A
Art Cinema
Donovan, StewartTH04:00PM-06:50PMBMH.101
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[3. Advanced Course] An introduction to the development, influence and major trends of art cinema in the 20th century. Prerequisite: ENGL 2723. (Post-1800.)

2603ENGL.3216.A1
Adv. Acting & Theatre Prod.
Ross, LisaTH02:30PM-05:20PMECH.AUD
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[3. Advanced Course] A course that focuses on the text as a performance vehicle written not only for readers, but more immediately for actors, directors, and designers. The course includes a public production. In-class presentations are also a major component of the course. Enrolment is restricted to those who have received permission from the instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 2233.

2567ENGL.3326.A1
The 17th Century
Smith, LeslieW F09:00AM-10:20AMGMH.204
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[3. Advanced Course]A study of the prose and poetry of Jonson, Donne, Herbert, and Milton, and the minor writers of the age. (Pre-1800).

2650ENGL.3343.A
Advanced Old English
Schutz, AndreaM W F01:30PM-02:20PMECH.320
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[3. Advanced Course] This course will continue the study of Old English, focussing on translation of prose and poetry. Prerequisite: ENGL 2346. (Pre-1800; Language.)

2564ENGL.3356.A1
Arthurian Literature
Schutz, AndreaM W F10:30AM-11:20AMBMH.102
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[3. Advanced Course] An exploration of the extensive traditions surrounding King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table. (Pre-1800.)

2649ENGL.3363.A
The Romantic Period I
McKim, ElizabethT TH02:30PM-03:50PMJDH.G6
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[3. Advanced Course] A study of the writings of William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and their contemporaries. (Post-1800.)

2556ENGL.3416.A1
American Literature
Robinson, MatthewM W F12:30PM-01:20PMGMH.304
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[3. Advanced Course] A study of the major authors of nineteenth and twentieth century American Literature. (Post-1800; American.)

2648ENGL.3433.A
World Literature I
Tremblay, AnthonyT TH10:00AM-11:20AMECH.G11
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[3. Advanced Course] An introduction to the range of literary expressions of writers from the non-­Western cultures of the West Indies and Africa. The major genre studied is the novel, though poetry and essays are also examined. The focus of the course is to study the concerns of the colonized, those who were swept up by British expansion in the 18th and 19th centuries. (Post-1800.)

2643ENGL.3453.A
Roots of Canadian Theatre
Prescott, JoshuaT TH11:30AM-12:50PMGMH.207
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[3. Advanced Course] An exploration of the emergence of theatre in Canada by examining pre- and post-Confed- eration plays. This course traces Canadian theatre, from its early appearance at Annapolis Royal in 1606 to the contemporary period, with a thematic emphasis on its colonial and postcolonial roots and their representations on stage and in text. Playwrights considered may include Lescarbot, Ryga, French, Thompson, and Clements. (Post-1800; Canadian.)

2641ENGL.3483.A
Irish Film
Donovan, StewartW04:00PM-06:50PMBMH.101
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[3. Advanced Course] A study of native Irish culture and the culture of the Irish diaspora. Students view films of high realist auteurs as well as adaptations of novels, short stories, and plays to the big screen. (Post-1800.)

2639ENGL.3723.A
Jane Austen
Woodworth, MeganM W F11:30AM-12:20PMMMH.202
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[3. Advanced Course] An examination of the novels of Jane Austen set against the cultural contexts that produced and popularized them. (Post-1800.)

2549ENGL.4336.A1
The Inklings
Schutz, AndreaM07:00PM-09:50PMMMH.201
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[3. Advanced Course]This course explores the works of the twentieth-century group of writers known as the Inklings, whose members included Charles Williams, C. S. Lewis, and J. R. R. Tolkien. These Christian writers produced some of the most influential modern fantasy literature. We will consider their role in shaping the genre, consider the relation of form to content, and discuss their impact on the subsequent development of the genre. 6 credit hours. (Categories: Authors and Authorship, Genre)

2819ENGL.4736.A1
Topics:Medieval Epic &Romance
Schutz, AndreaM W02:30PM-03:50PMECH.320
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[3. Advanced Course] We will read (in translation) medieval European epics and romances from the 8th-14th Centuries. Texts may include Beowulf, Volsungasaga, Song of Roland, Poetic Edda, The Cid and works by Chrètien de Troyes and others. Prerequisites: admission to the Honours program in English, or 3.7 GPA standing for English Majors.

2480ENVS.1013.A
Intro. to Environmental Prob.
Harvey, JaniceM W F10:30AM-11:20AMECH.120
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Earth systems science reveals that the environmental conditions that supported the development of human civilization over the past 10,000 years are becoming increasingly destabilized. This course introduces students to the Earth's regulatory systems such as climate, nitrogen and phosphorus flows, forests, oceans and biodiversity, and the social structures and processes that are interfering with them. Students will come to understand that environmental problems cannot be solved by individual behavioural changes; solutions will require collective action to achieve systemic change.

2481ENVS.1013.B
Intro. to Environmental Prob.
Harvey, JaniceM W F01:30PM-02:20PMMMH.308
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Earth systems science reveals that the environmental conditions that supported the development of human civilization over the past 10,000 years are becoming increasingly destabilized. This course introduces students to the Earth's regulatory systems such as climate, nitrogen and phosphorus flows, forests, oceans and biodiversity, and the social structures and processes that are interfering with them. Students will come to understand that environmental problems cannot be solved by individual behavioural changes; solutions will require collective action to achieve systemic change.

2736ESL.1013.A
Eng for Acad: Read and Writ I
Van Den Broeck, ChrisM W F10:30AM-11:20AMMMH.201
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[1.ESL Courses]This course helps students whose first language is not English develop the reading and writing skills required in university studies. The reading techniques to be taught will include skimming, previewing, predicting and in-depth analyzing. The types of writing practiced will be summaries, paraphrases and essays (expository, and comparison and contrast). Vocabulary-building and grammar will also be important components of the course. Co-requisite: ESL 1033.

2737ESL.1023.A
Eng for Acad: Read and Writ II
Robinson-Smith, AnthonyM W F11:30AM-12:20PMMMH.201
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[1.ESL Courses]This course will help students whose first language is not English further develop academic reading and writing skills. The reading techniques to be improved will include skimming, previewing, predicting and in-depth analyzing. The types of writing practiced will be summaries, paraphrases and essays (cause and effect, and persuasive). Vocabulary-building and grammar will also be important components of the course. Students will also develop their ability to conduct library-based research and to synthesize information for writing assignments. Prerequisite: ESL 1013 or Director's permission. Co-requisite: ESL 1043.

2738ESL.1033.A
Eng for Acad: Speak and List I
Van Den Broeck, ChrisT TH10:00AM-11:20AMMMH.201
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[1.ESL Courses]This course helps students whose first language is not English to develop the speaking and listening skills required in university studies. The basic elements of oral expression and comprehension will be studied: sounds, word and sentence stress, rhythm, intonation, comprehension of weak forms, and connected speech. Listening skills will include intensive, selective and interactive tasks, such as note-taking. Speaking functions will include presenting information, asking questions, debating. 6 hours per week. Co-requisite: ESL 1013.

2739ESL.1043.A
Eng for Acad: Speak and Lis II
Van Den Broeck, ChrisM W F12:30PM-01:20PMMMH.201
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[1.ESL Courses]This course helps students whose first language is not English to develop the speaking and listening skills required in university studies. The basic elements of oral expression and comprehension will be studied: sounds, word and sentence stress, rhythm, intonation, comprehension of weak forms, and connected speech. Listening skills will include intensive, selective and interactive tasks, such as note-taking. Speaking functions will include presenting information, asking questions and debating. 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: ESL 1033 or Director's permission. Co-requisite: ESL 1023.

2741ESL.2213.A
Adv. Eng. for Acad. Purposes I
James, ArthurT TH01:00PM-02:20PMHCH.7
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[1.ESL Courses]This course is designed to assist ESL students in meeting the language-related expectations of university courses. The primary focus will be on academic writing skills. Attention will also be devoted to listening, speaking, reading, grammar, and vocabulary acquisition. Language skills will be linked to academic content from a number of disciplines. The course is intended for students whose first language is not English and whose TOEFL scores are between 550 and 599 (or a recognized equivalent). Prerequisite: ESL 1023 or Director's permission.

2742ESL.2223.A
Adv. Eng. for Acad. Purpose II
James, ArthurT TH02:30PM-03:50PMHCH.7
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[1.ESL Courses]This course is designed to assist ESL students in further developing their ability to meet the language-related expectations of university courses. The emphasis will be on refining writing skills. Attention will also be devoted to listening, speaking, reading, grammar, and vocabulary acquisition. Students will explore how the various language skills are interconnected in the university context. The course is intended for students whose first language is not English and whose TOEFL scores are between 550 and 599 (or a recognized equivalent). Prerequisite: ESL 2213 or Director's permission.

3012FNAR.1023.A
Music Theory and Performance
Kutnowski, MartinT TH04:00PM-05:20PMMMH.101
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The course examines the basic elements of music (notation, intervals, keys, scales, chords, meter) from a practical, hands-on perspective and introduces music theory and performance. Assignments include recognizing notes and rhythms on the staff, singing, and playing instruments. Please note that previous music experience is welcome but not required for this course.

3004FNAR.1051.A1
STU Singers I
Simonds, RossM05:30PM-06:50PMMMH.101
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The St. Thomas Singers is a no-audition choir, open to students and the academic community at large. Rehearsals take place once a week; with at least two concert performances per year towards the end of each term. The course earns one credit per year. A course fee may be required for the purchase of scores and other performance expenses. No previous knowledge of music is necessary.

3013FNAR.1083.A
Voice Technique
Simonds, RossM W F01:30PM-02:20PMMMH.101
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This course is an in-depth exploration of singing. During the course, students will do exercises to develop their breathing, phonation, resonance, and articulation skills. Students will also examine the physiology of the voice and expand their awareness of how the voice works, vocal problems, and vocal care and health. In addition, students will perform songs from popular music styles such as musical theatre, rock, pop, and gospel for a public audience. All levels welcome.

3014FNAR.1113.A
Practical Intro. to Art Fund.
Forrestall, WilliamW02:30PM-05:20PMJDH.212
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This course is a practical introduction to concepts, basic materials, processes and the vocabulary of art and design delivered through slide lectures, readings and assigned projects. The concepts introduced in this course are applicable to a wide range of art and design practices. There are special presentations including visiting artist presentations, film screenings and trips to art galleries.

3015FNAR.1303.A
The Guitar in Western Music
Peacock, StevenM W F12:30PM-01:20PMMMH.101
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This course offers an overview of and a wide-ranging appreciation for the guitar within the broad tradition of Western music, exploring the guitar in its many forms and across many genres of musical expression. The course examines the history of the guitar (including its antecedent forms-the lute, vihuela and bandora, for example), its design evolution, the approaches to technique which the evolving instrument has engendered, its repertoire, and the composers and performers whose contributions to guitar music have been particularly notable. No previous guitar-playing ability is required, but at least a basic practical knowledge will be encouraged.

3016FNAR.2013.A
Understanding Music
Kutnowski, MartinT TH10:00AM-11:20AMMMH.101
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This course is a selective chronological survey of Western Art Music. After exploring basic concepts, terms, and principles of design in music, this course examines the styles from the Middle Ages to the present, providing the tools for understanding and appreciating selected works of composers of all eras. Emphasis is placed on attentive listening, responses to realtime performances, analysis of representative works of the literature, and formally written responses to secondary sources. The course hopes to instill intelligent listening habits and the ability to recognize different forms and styles. Please note: this is not a music theory or music notation course; no previous musical experience is necessary.

3017FNAR.2043.A
Hot 100:Songwriting/Arrange
Kutnowski, MartinT TH11:30AM-12:50PMMMH.101
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This course is a practical survey of the song as a genre, from John Dowland to Franz Schubert to The Beatles to Lady Ga - Ga to OneRepublic, with a particular focus on text setting, harmony, and arranging. Practical assignments include analysis, composition, and performance, both in group and individually. The final project comprises the composition, MIDI recording, and performance of an original song. Prerequisite: FNAR 1023, or permission by the instructor.

3006FNAR.2051.A1
STU Singers II
Simonds, RossM05:30PM-06:50PMMMH.101
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The St. Thomas Singers is a no-audition choir, open to students and the academic community at large. Rehearsals take place once a week; with at least two concert performances per year towards the end of each term. The course earns one credit per year. A course fee may be required for the purchase of scores and other performance expenses. No previous knowledge of music is necessary.

3060FNAR.2136.A1
Musical Theatre I
Breen, TaniaM W F10:30AM-11:20AMMMH.101
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In this course, students research, rehearse and perform a musical. To this end, students will learn how to prepare for a role; engage in a rehearsal process; implement acting, singing, and dancing techniques in performance; assist with technical elements; and demonstrate professionalism in their work. The course culminates in a fully-staged production of a musical for a public audience. Musical Theatre I is a year-ong course to be taken with Acting, Singing, Dancing I. First-year students welcome. Prerequisites: Instructor's consent. Co-requisites: FNAR 2153 (Acting, Singing, Dancing I).

3062FNAR.2153.A1
Acting, Singing, Dancing I
Breen, TaniaM W F11:30AM-12:20PMMMH.101
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This course offers students intensive training in acting, singing, and dancing. Students will learn fundamental acting techniques and apply them to scenes and songs from the musical theatre repertoire. In addition, students will do practical exercises to develop their breathing, phonation, resonance, and articulation skills. Students will also hone their dancing abilities by taking jazz classes. Acting, Singing, Dancing I is a year-long course to be taken with Musical Theatre I. Prerequisites: None. Co-requisites: FNAR 2136 (Musical Theatre I).

3024FNAR.2413.A
The Motorcycle and Art
Peck, RobinT TH11:30AM-12:50PMJDH.212
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Perhaps more than any other single object of industrial design, the motorcycle is a metaphor for the 20th century. Through a series of slide lectures, assigned readings, and partial film screenings, this seminar class will be an historical and critical survey of the motorcycle in art and as art. It will introduce students to a variety of art issues through industrial pop culture.

3025FNAR.2963.A
Acting for Film and TV
Breen, TaniaM W02:30PM-03:50PMMMH.101
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This course teaches students the basics of acting for film and TV. Topics will include adjusting acting for shot size, hitting marks, matching eyelines, and maintaining continuity. Students will also practice the core concepts of scene study, including breaking a scene into beats, pursuing objectives, playing actions, and working to overcome obstacles. The course culminates in a screening of scenes for a public audience.

3008FNAR.3051.A1
STU Singers III
Simonds, RossM05:30PM-06:50PMMMH.101
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The St. Thomas Singers is a no-audition choir, open to students and the academic community at large. Rehearsals take place once a week; with at least two concert performances per year towards the end of each term. The course earns one credit per year. A course fee may be required for the purchase of scores and other performance expenses. No previous knowledge of music is necessary.

3026FNAR.3123.A
Critical Theory in Cont. Arts
Vose-Jones, KimT TH01:00PM-02:20PMGMH.205
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A seminar discussion class reviewing a selection from the critical theories that have informed the visual arts since 1945, including Modernism, Post-Modernism, Formalism, Structuralism and Post-Structuralism, Marxist and post-Marxist theory, Feminism, Gay studies, etc. in their application to Visual Arts. Students will gain a vocabulary necessary to the contemporary criticism of visual art. Prerequisite: FNAR 1113.

3064FNAR.3136.A1
Musical Theatre II
Breen, TaniaM W F10:30AM-11:20AMMMH.101
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In this course, students research, rehearse and perform a musical. To this end, students will learn how to prepare for a role; engage in a rehearsal process; implement acting, singing, and dancing techniques in performance; assist with technical elements; and demonstrate professionalism in their work. The course culminates in a fully-staged production of a musical for a public audience. Musical Theatre II is a year-long course to be taken with Acting, Singing, Dancing II. Prerequisites: Instructor's consent and FNAR 2136. Co-requisites: FNAR 3153 (Acting, Singing, Dancing II).

3066FNAR.3153.A1
Acting, Singing, Dancing II
Breen, TaniaM W F11:30AM-12:20PMMMH.101
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This course offers students intensive training in acting, singing, and dancing. Students will learn fundamental acting techniques and apply them to scenes and songs from the musical theatre repertoire. In addition, students will do practical exercises to develop their breathing, phonation, resonance, and articulation skills. Students will also hone their dancing abilities by taking jazz classes. Acting, Singing, Dancing II is a year-long course to be taken with Musical Theatre II. Prerequisites: FNAR 2153. Co-requisites: FNAR 3136 (Musical Theatre II).

3027FNAR.3323.A
Entropy and the New Monuments
Peck, RobinT TH02:30PM-03:50PMJDH.212
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This course is a study of the writings of American artist Robert Smithson (1938-1973). Smithson provides students with an historical role model for the important link between visual art and critical writing. Smithson's art and writing had a profound impact on art and art theory for over thirty years and continues to do so today. His ideas took root in many forms: drawings, projects and proposals, sculpture, earthworks, films and critical writings. Prerequisite: FNAR 1113.

3010FNAR.4051.A1
STU Singers IV
Simonds, RossM05:30PM-06:50PMMMH.101
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The St. Thomas Singers is a no-audition choir, open to students and the academic community at large. Rehearsals take place once a week; with at least two concert performances per year towards the end of each term. The course earns one credit per year. A course fee may be required for the purchase of scores and other performance expenses. No previous knowledge of music is necessary.

3068FNAR.4136.A1
Musical Theatre III
Breen, TaniaM W F10:30AM-11:20AMMMH.101
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In this course, students research, rehearse and perform a musical. To this end, students will learn how to prepare for a role; engage in a rehearsal process; implement acting, singing, and dancing techniques in performance; assist with technical elements; and demonstrate professionalism in their work. The course culminates in a fully-staged production of a musical for a public audience. Musical Theatre III is a year-long course to be taken with Acting, Singing, Dancing III. Prerequisites: Instructor's consent and FNAR 3136. Co-requisites: FNAR 4153 (Acting, Singing, Dancing III).

3070FNAR.4153.A1
Acting, Singing, Dancing III
Breen, TaniaM W F11:30AM-12:30PMMMH.101
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This course offers students intensive training in acting, singing, and dancing. Students will learn fundamental acting techniques and apply them to scenes and songs from the musical theatre repertoire. In addition, students will do practical exercises to develop their breathing, phonation, resonance, and articulation skills. Students will also hone their dancing abilities by taking jazz classes. Acting, Singing, Dancing III is a year-long course to be taken with Musical Theatre III. Prerequisites: FNAR 3153. Co-requisites: FNAR 4136 (Musical Theatre III).

2904FREN.1016.A1
Langue Francaise 1
Allain, AliceT TH08:30AM-09:50AMECH.G14
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]This course is designed for students entering university who achieved a score of Basic, Basic+ or Intermediate in French in high school. The aims of this course are listening comprehension,basic oral expression, elementary reading, writing and grammar.

3333FREN.1016.B1
Langue Francaise 1
Safty, EssamT TH08:30AM-09:50AMECH.320
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]This course is designed for students entering university who achieved a score of Basic, Basic+ or Intermediate in French in high school. The aims of this course are listening comprehension,basic oral expression, elementary reading, writing and grammar.

2896FREN.1026.A1
Langue Francaise 2
Gaudet, JeannetteM W F10:30AM-11:20AMECH.G14
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]This course is designed for New Brunswick students entering university who have achieved a score of Intermediate+ or above in French in high school. The course has a strong reading component with material drawn from a variety of sources in the francophone world. It emphasizes the four skills: oral practice, reading, writing and listening comprehension.

2902FREN.1026.B1
Langue Francaise 2
Francis, CeciliaT TH10:00AM-11:20AMECH.G14
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]This course is designed for New Brunswick students entering university who have achieved a score of Intermediate+ or above in French in high school. The course has a strong reading component with material drawn from a variety of sources in the francophone world. It emphasizes the four skills: oral practice, reading, writing and listening comprehension.

2976FREN.2113.A
Prose et cinéma
Francis, CeciliaT TH04:00PM-05:20PMECH.G14
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[Module 2: Civilisation du monde francophone] Parce qu'ils mobilisent l'imaginaire et l'esprit de découverte, le texte littéraire et le cinéma peuvent être sources de plaisir et de motivation à la lecture et à l'écriture. Ce cours est centré sur la lecture et la comprehension de textes narratifs (nouvelle et roman) et cinématographiques. L'étudiant se familiarisera aux éléments fondamentaux du texte narratifen prose et aux éléments du montage et de l'esthétique du cinéma.

2890FREN.2306.A1
Textes: niveau 2
Mbarga, ChristianT TH11:30AM-12:50PMECH.124
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[Module 1: Langue francaise] Ce cours cherche à approfondir et à étendre les connaissances de base acquises. Par un choix de lectures variées, le cours vise à améliorer la compréhension de textes écrits, à faciliter l'apprentissage du vocabulaire, et à familiariser les étudiants avec le monde et les cultures de la Francophonie.

2860FREN.2316.A1
Grammaire Du Francais
Gaudet, JeannetteM W F12:30PM-01:20PMECH.223
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[Module 1: Langue francaise] Révision et approfondissement des règles de base de la grammaire française: la conjugaison du verbe, les modes et temps du verbe, les accords, les compléments, les pronoms personnels et relatifs. Étude de la forme de la phrase, de la syntaxe et de la fonction des mots. Préalable: FREN 1016 et/ou FREN 1026 ou la permission du professeur.

2849FREN.2326.A1
La Composition
Francis, CeciliaT TH01:00PM-02:20PMECH.G14
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]Destiné aux étudiants ayant une bonne connaissance des rudiments de la grammaire française, ce cours vise à développer des compétences dans le domaine de la rédaction et de la révision de textes et de travaux écrits. L'étudiant apprendra à structurer et à nuancer sa pensée à l'aide de modalités rhétoriques et de stratégies argumentatives mises en application. Seront privilégiées les pratiques discursives suivantes: le portrait, la description, la narration, l'essai, l'article journalistique, la dissertation classique, l'explication de texte, le compte rendu et la correspondance. Il est fortement recommandé aux étudiants de suivre en même temps le cours FREN 2316. Cours préalable : FREN 1016 ou FREN 1026.

2975FREN.2333.A
Conversational French
Mbarga, ChristianM07:00PM-09:50PMECH.223
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]This course is designed for students who wish to improve their abilities in spoken French and listening comprehension. It will focus on developing skills and lexical flexibility for participating actively in a normal converstion with native interlocutors, on presenting and defending opinions on a variety of subjects in social and professional situations. Prerequisite: FREN 2333 is open to students with Intermediate+, or Advanced level of oral proficiency.

2974FREN.3233.A
Traduction
Safty, EssamT TH11:30AM-12:50PMECH.320
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[Module 1: Langue francaise] Ce cours se veut une initiation à la traduction. Un choix de notions linguistiques faisant partie de la traduction d'unités de langue, de phrases et de textes fournira le cadre méthodologique aux travaux appliqués. Des exercices pratiques porteront sur la traduction des extraits provenant des genres tels la nouvelle, le roman, la correspondance, l'essai, l'écrit journalistique et l'écrit technique. L'étude comparative fournira l'occasion d'effectuer des traductions dans deux sens (de l'anglais au français et du français à l'anglais). Les étudiants prendront connaissance d'un certain nombre d'outils informatisés de traduction. Cours préalables : FREN 2316 : Grammaire du français.

2973FREN.3413.A
Grammaire Avancee
Safty, EssamT TH10:00AM-11:20AMECH.320
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]Ce cours s'adresse à ceux qui sont soucieux de la pureté de la langue française, dont les très nombreux pièges et subtilités suscitent souvent l'embarras du locuteur. Il s'agit en l'occurrence d'un point de vue normatif qui, identifiant les tours fautifs et les constructions incorrectes aboutissant à quelque impropriété, consacre le bon usage tout en permettant de saisir le subtil. On y fera la synthèse des recommandations des meilleurs grammairiens contemporains en vue d'aboutir à l'usage d'une langue claire. Cours préalable : FREN 2316 ou l'approbation du professeur.

2953FREN.3433.A
De l'oral a l'ecrit
Mbarga, ChristianT TH10:00AM-11:20AMECH.124
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]Ce cours est consacré au perfectionnement des competences orales et rédactionnelles. Cours préalable: 12 heures de credits en français au niveau 2000 ou l'approbation du professeur.

2952FREN.3603.A
Civ. Francophone 1: Europe Fr
Gaudet, JeannetteM W02:30PM-03:50PMECH.G12
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[Module 2: Civilisation du monde francophone|Foundation Courses] Ce cours se propose de mieux faire connaître la production culturelle des pays européens francophones, notamment la France, la Suisse et la Belgique. A travers le roman, le film, la nouvelle, la poésie et la chanson nous explorerons divers grands thèmes tels que la mort, l'exil, l'aliénation, l'amour et la réconciliation. Cours préalable: FREN 2306 ou FREN 2113/2123 ou la permission du professeur.

2908FREN.3633.A
Civ. Franc 4: Afrique Subsah.
Mbarga, ChristianT TH04:00PM-05:20PMECH.124
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[Module 2: Civilisation du monde francophone|Foundation Courses] Ce cours a pour objet l'étude des cultures francophones subsaharienne et caribéenne, fruits de plusieurs siècles de contacts et d'échanges entre les Africains et les Européens. Cette étude se fera à travers la foisonnante et dynamique production écrite (roman, nouvelle, poésie, etc.) et cinématographique issue des Caräibes et de l'Afrique francophone. Des thèmes tels que la Négritude, la créolité, le colonialisme, la tradition, le concept de la famille, les modes de vie et les croyances seront étudiés. Cours préalable: FREN 2306 ou FREN 2113/2123 ou la permission du professeur.

2940GEND.2016.A1
Intro. to Women's Studies
Fredericks, ErinT TH10:00AM-11:20AMMMH.203
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This is the introductory course to the interdisciplinary field of Women's Studies and Gender Studies. The basis of femininity, masculinity and women's inequality are examined in the context of wider social relations, including the historical subject, literary voice and the women's movement.

2402GERO.1013.A
Introduction to Gerontology
Durkee Lloyd, JanetT TH10:00AM-11:20AMECH.120
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This course introduces the subject of population aging from a multidisciplinary perspective. Topics to be discussed include: the status of aging in Canada and the world, ethnicity, social change, gerontological theory and the physical and psychological aspects of growing older.

2409GERO.1013.B
Introduction to Gerontology
Durkee Lloyd, JanetT TH02:30PM-03:50PMECH.103
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This course introduces the subject of population aging from a multidisciplinary perspective. Topics to be discussed include: the status of aging in Canada and the world, ethnicity, social change, gerontological theory and the physical and psychological aspects of growing older.

2410GERO.2673.A
Adult Development & Aging
Randall, WilliamT TH02:30PM-03:50PMMMH.308
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The course provides an introduction to psychological aspects of aging faced by young, middle-aged, and older adults as they adapt to life events. Topics of study include: theories on personality and its development across the lifespan; the impact of aging on intelligence, memory, creativity, and learning; changes with age in social roles and relationships; and the development of meaning and spirituality in mid - and later life. Prerequisites: GERO 1013, GERO 1023 or PSYC 1023.

2411GERO.3023.A
Aging and Health
Randall, WilliamT TH11:30AM-12:50PMJDH.205
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Various aspects of aging and health are addressed in this course. Topics considered include: theories of biological aging; normal vs. pathological physical changes that accompany the aging process; various chronic conditions that affect quality of life in later life; the implications of physical aging for medication use and nutritional status among older adults; and the impact of an aging population on the provision of acute care, long-term care, and home care for older adults. Prerequisite: GERO 1013 and GERO 1023.

2412GERO.3033.A
Aging and Spirituality
Irwin-Kenyon, GaryM W02:30PM-03:50PMGMH.304
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This lecture-seminar course examines the phenomenon of spirituality and its relationship to the process of aging. There are two main themes explored in the course. First, we attempt to understand the meaning of spirituality itself by discussing a range of spiritual and religious traditions. And second, we consider the practical and ethical issues that arise from an explicit acknowledgement of human spirituality in research and practice in gerontology.

2414GERO.3053.A
Qualitative Research Methods
Caissie, LindaT TH04:00PM-05:20PMMMH.204
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This course will introduce students to qualitative research methods used in social science, with an emphasis on gerontology. It will address theoretical foundations of qualitative analysis, ethical considerations involving older adults, and provide hands-on experience in developing a research question, and collecting and analyzing data using basic qualitative techniques in gerontology. It will also prepare students in writing a qualitative research proposal. Prerequisite: GERO 1013 + 1023 or permission of the instructor.

2419GERO.3073.A
Narrative Gerontology
Randall, WilliamW02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.204
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This seminar-style course considers the theoretical and practical implications for gerontology of the metaphor of life as story. Against the background of the narrative turn across the human sciences and of specific practices in geriatric care like life review and reminiscence, the course explores the narrative complexity of autobiographical memory in particular and of identity development in general. Through readings, assignments, and classroom activities, students are encouraged to consider the narrative dynamics of their own identity development and to appreciate the complexity of the storytelling-story listening exchanges that are pivotal to providing narrative care with older adults. Limited enrolment. Prerequisites: GERO 1013 and GERO 1023.

2421GERO.3223.A
Family Ties in Later Life
Durkee Lloyd, JanetT TH01:00PM-02:20PMBMH.102
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This course examines a variety of issues regarding aging and the family. It considers historical and demographic trends as well as theoretical frameworks in family gerontology. The course covers a number of relationships including those of couples, siblings, and grandparents and grandchildren. It also looks at late-life transitions such as retirement, widowhood, and divorce, all of which affect family structures and relationships.

2429GERO.3233.A
Aging and Tai Chi
Irwin-Kenyon, GaryT TH08:30AM-09:50AMMMH.106
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Tai Chi is a mind-body-spirit intervention that contributes to the maximization of quality of life for both frail and well adults. This course explores the philosophy and principles that form the basis of the art of Tai Chi. The course will also review research that demonstrates a range of health benefits of Tai Chi to adults of all ages, physical and psychological. Participants in the course will learn basic Tai Chi movements, and be introduced to guidelines for designing a program based on Tai Chi, for implementation in a variety of settings. The course will be of interest to students contemplating a career in gerontology, recreation, social work, education, or fine arts. The course is introductory and does not assume any experience on the part of the students.

2432GERO.3743.A
Critical Appr. to Nursing Home
Caissie, LindaT07:00PM-09:50PMMMH.204
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This seminar course will examine the phenomenon of nursing homes from an ethnographic and critical point of view and will include both sociological and anthropological perspectives. Prerequisite: GERO 1013.

2434GERO.4013.A
Seminar in Gerontology
Irwin-Kenyon, GaryM07:00PM-09:50PMHCH.5
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This seminar course consists of an in-depth analysis of a specific problem or issue in the field of aging. Students have their chosen topic area approved and supervised by the course instructor. The purpose of this course is to integrate a student's theoretical and practical understanding of a specific area by way of a combination of a major paper, presentations, and/or other research. Prerequisites: GERO 1013 + 1023.

2729GRID.2006.A
The Quest for the Good Life
Dinan, MatthewM W F12:30PM-02:20PMHCH.5
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This course is designed to approach the perennial issue of The Quest for the Good Life through the thoughtful reading of some of the greatest works in a variety of disciplines. The texts will include ancient and modern, all selected because they speak to and illuminate this theme. Texts will vary from year to year but will include works such as Aristotle's Ethics, the Bible, Machiavelli's Prince, and Camus' The Plague.

2799GRID.3606.A
Faith and Reason
Hall, AlanM W F10:30AM-12:20PMHCH.5
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This course will explore faith and reason as two ways by which human beings apprehend the truth, the fundamental object of our understanding. The nature and capacity of faith and reason as well as their relationship to one another will be explored through literary and philosophic texts that posit either one or both of these modes as the path to knowledge. Texts may vary from year to year, but normally the course will include works such as Aeschylus' Oresteia, The Gospel of John, Descartes' Discourse on Method, selections from Luther, and Kant's Critique of Pure Reason.

2800GRID.4903.A
Honours Seminar
Dinan, MatthewW F09:00AM-10:20AMMMH.201
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This seminar will be centred on the intensive study of the text(s) of a thinker who has greatly influenced the shape of the western world. The texts may be ancient or modern, and may be literary, historical, philosophic, and/or political in nature.

2604HIST.1006.A1
World History
Robert, KarenM W F11:30AM-12:20PMJDH.G1
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[1. World]This course provides an overview of world history, from earliest times to the present. Major themes include human relationships with the environment, cultural exchanges between peoples, and the interconnectedness of the human experience. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1013 or HIST 1023.

2610HIST.1006.B1
World History
Walhain, LucM W F10:30AM-11:20AMJDH.G1
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[1. World]This course provides an overview of world history, from earliest times to the present. Major themes include human relationships with the environment, cultural exchanges between peoples, and the interconnectedness of the human experience. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1013 or HIST 1023.

2646HIST.1013.A
World History I
Watt, CareyT TH11:30AM-12:50PMBMH.102
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[1. World] This 3-credit course is half of the world history survey. It gives an overview of world history events, issues, themes and approaches to about 1400 of the Common Era (CE). It covers topics such as the origins of the universe (the Big Bang & Cosmic History), Paleolithic societies, the transition to agricultural societies, the rise of major states, empires and cultural traditions, the Silk Roads, and networks of cross-cultural interaction. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1006.

2642HIST.2003.A
Exploring History
Watt, CareyW F09:00AM-10:20AMECH.223
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[10. Special]This mandatory course for History Majors and Honours students provides an introduction to the discipline of History. The course examines a variety of historiographical and method- ological approaches to History, as well as the history of History. It encourages students to re-examine their assumptions about History, but it will also help students develop their basic historical research and writing skills. Exploring History provides a foundation for upper-year History courses and students are strongly encouraged to take it before their third year. Prerequisite: At least 6 credit hours in History courses at St. Thomas University.

2640HIST.2043.A
Modern Europe
Torrie, JuliaT TH11:30AM-12:50PMMMH.203
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[6. Regions (Europe)]An introduction to modern European civilization from the era of the French Revolution to the twentieth century. The course follows History 2033 chronologically but has no prerequisite. This course requires written assignments and emphasizes acceptable methods of historical research and writing.

2638HIST.2103.A
The Material World
Cross, BradleyM W02:30PM-03:50PMECH.120
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[1. World]This course examines themes in world history through the use and study of material objects. Histories of everyday materials and objects allow us to examine diverse issues such as the environment, history, technology, and culture. In general, historians have relied primarily on text-based sources and this course will explore the role and use of material objects in doing history. We will examine theoretical approaches to material history as well as survey the historical literature of this branch of study.

2636HIST.2133.A
Precolonial Africa
Gebrekidan, FikruT TH10:00AM-11:20AMECH.223
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[2. Regions (Africa)]Precolonial Africa explores the history of Africa up to the nineteenth century. Topics covered include Africa's place in hominid evolution, Africa's contribution to the Neolithic revolution, rise of the states versus stateless societies, traditional religion versus world religions, coastal societies versus inland societies, long-distance trade and the rise of empires, and domestic slavery versus transoceanic slavery and their effects on development. The objective is to challenge stereotypic notions about precolonial African societies, to contribute to students' understanding of Africa's place in early world history, and to introduce students to some of the key historiographical debates on precolonial African history.

2601HIST.2206.A1
History of the Middle Ages
Mullin, JanetT TH04:00PM-05:20PMJDH.G5
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[6. Regions (Europe)]A survey of the imagined historical period between the fall of the classical Roman/Persian Empires and the emergence of an early modern state system. This course will range widely in its coverage, including glimpses of experience in parts of Africa and Asia as well as Europe. Special emphasis will be placed on social history and the use of primary sources to probe beyond simplified political narratives.

2634HIST.3113.A
Modern and Revolutionary China
Walhain, LucW F09:00AM-10:20AMJDH.205
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[8. State, Nation, and Locality (Asia)]This is a survey of the final century of dynastic rule in China, and the rise to power of the Nationalist and Communist parties, examining social and cultural developments, the impact of Western imperialism, and the evolution of revolutionary ideologies, up to Mao's death. Prerequisite: HIST 1006 OR HIST 1013 & HIST 1023, HIST 2173, OR permission of the instructor.

2632HIST.3203.A
The Briti. Atlan. World
Huskins, BonnieM W04:00PM-05:20PMECH.G14
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[3. Regions (Oceans)]This course explores the social, political, and economic parameters of the Atlantic World from roughly 1500 to 1800. The course centres on the British experience of the Atlantic through a comparative and trans-national approach. Particular attention will be drawn to the role of Atlantic Canada and its connection to the larger Atlantic World.

2629HIST.3553.A
The History Workshop
Robert, KarenM02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.201
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[10. Special]The Workshop provides students with the opportunity to enhance their skills of historical analysis, writing and oral communication through close engagement with an important historical event or issue. The Workshop is recommended for students planning to take 4000-level seminars, as well as students considering an application to graduate programs or professional schools. Please consult the History Department Handbook, Chair or web page for upcoming Workshop topics. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

2622HIST.3643.A
Race and Racism in Modern Hist
Gebrekidan, FikruT TH01:00PM-02:20PMECH.124
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[1. World]Differences in skin color and physical characteristics took on a new significance in modern times. The newly invented concept of race classified human beings into several distinct categories with corresponding intellectual and behavioral traits. Race and Racism in Modern History studies the evolution of race thinking during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, as well as the extent to which such thoughts have since shaped the trajectory of world history.

2618HIST.3743.A
United States:Since 1945
Cross, BradleyT TH01:00PM-02:20PMECH.G11
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[7. State, Nation, and Locality (The Americas)]This course examines the changing place in the world of the United States, the superpower of the 20th century, and analyses its character as a society. The course surveys political, social, and cultural trends from the role of the US in the 1940s as a military and economic colossus to its decline in the present postmodern, post-industrial world. It deals with such topics as the Cold War, Civil Rights, Vietnam, women's liberation, suburban life, consumerism, the corporations and unions, popular culture, the 1960s counter culture, and the Internet. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in History.

2616HIST.3773.A
Urban North America
Cross, BradleyT TH10:00AM-11:20AMJDH.205
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[4. Regions (The Americas)]Addresses developments within and among North American cities and explores changes in the conception of cities in North American thought and culture. We will study the lives of urban dwellers and chart shifts in the way people organized their lives in cities. Major themes for this course include the changing physical structure and form of cities over time, processes of urbanization and suburbanization, city planing and reform movements, the economics of cities, urban institutions, urban populations, and city politics. In our investigation of Urban North America, we will ask: does the border make a difference?

2599HIST.4026.A1
Food in World History
Torrie, JuliaT02:30PM-05:20PMECH.320
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[1. World]Food keeps us alive, serves as a marker of social status, a stimulator of exploration and trade, and a cause of conflict and war. This seminar is about the history of food production, consumption and culture world-wide. Participants explore the roles food plays in human soci- eties, the social and cultural meanings of food and the ways foods travel from place to place. Equally, we consider food's presence, its absence and the impact of man-made and natural disasters on eating habits and food supplies. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

2595HIST.4196.A1
Peoples History of Korea
Walhain, LucTH02:30PM-05:20PMECH.320
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[8. State, Nation, and Locality (Asia)] This seminar proposes an in-depth study of the modern history of Korea from the perspective of its least acknowledged, yet determinant, agent: the people. It examines major social movements which shaped Korean history and democratisation, e.g. the college student and labour movements. It also addresses Korea's geopolitical predicament from the viewpoint of some of its victims, such as the Korean sex slaves under Japanese colonial rule and Korea's political and economic prisoners of the Cold War. Prerequisite: HIST 1006 OR HIST 1013 & HIST 1023, OR permission of the instructor.

2762HMRT.1006.A1
Introduction to Human Rights
Szurlej, ChristinaT TH01:00PM-02:20PMJDH.G1
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This course will introduce students to the study of human rights by investigating the question what is a human right? The course will proceed primarily through a number of examples and case studies. Students will also be given an overview of the basic instruments, institutions, and ideas relevant to human rights.

2773HMRT.1006.B1
Introduction to Human Rights
Dipaolo O'Brien, AmandaW F09:00AM-10:20AMJDH.G1
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This course will introduce students to the study of human rights by investigating the question what is a human right? The course will proceed primarily through a number of examples and case studies. Students will also be given an overview of the basic instruments, institutions, and ideas relevant to human rights.

2778HMRT.1006.C1
Introduction to Human Rights
Comeau, MichaelT07:00PM-09:50PMJDH.G1
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This course will introduce students to the study of human rights by investigating the question what is a human right? The course will proceed primarily through a number of examples and case studies. Students will also be given an overview of the basic instruments, institutions, and ideas relevant to human rights.

3212HMRT.1006.D1
Introduction to Human Rights
Szurlej, ChristinaT TH08:30AM-09:50AMMMH.203
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This course will introduce students to the study of human rights by investigating the question what is a human right? The course will proceed primarily through a number of examples and case studies. Students will also be given an overview of the basic instruments, institutions, and ideas relevant to human rights.

2793HMRT.2043.A
Non-Western Perspectives
Wilkie, RodgerW F09:00AM-10:20AMJDH.G2
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This course will explore philosophic and religious sources outside the Western canon, on which Human Rights discourse can be and has been based. The culture spheres of interest will be the Middle East, Asia, and Africa. This course critically analyzes non-western theories concerning the practice of human rights as a framework for social justice. The course seeks to place Western Human Rights discourse in a global context by drawing attention to ways in which non-Western cultures have addressed questions of individual versus group or state rights, the metaphysical and political sources of rights, and the possibility of universal human dignity.

2796HMRT.3063.A
Crimes Against Humanity
Szurlej, ChristinaTH02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.307
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This course will examine strategies to prevent, investigate and punish genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Students will explore the protection of victims and their fundamental rights in emergency situations, the rights and duties of relevant stakeholders, and the role of international law in addressing grievous human rights violations.

2839HMRT.3503.A
Moot Court
Dipaolo O'Brien, AmandaW02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.106
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Moot court cultivates advanced analytical skills while developing leadership qualities in students with an interest in human rights. Students learn how to develop and deliver oral legal arguments by competing in a Supreme Court simulation where they answer questions from a panel of judges. Students focus on Supreme Court precedent surrounding two different issues each year. Students are required to have permission of instructor to register for the course. No other prerequisites are required.

2841HMRT.3513.A
Moot Court II
Dipaolo O'Brien, AmandaW02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.102
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Moot court cultivates advanced analytical skills while developing leadership qualities in students with an interest in human rights. Students learn how to develop and deliver oral legal arguments by competing in a Supreme Court simulation where they answer questions from a panel of judges. Students focus on Supreme Court precedent surrounding two different issues each year. Students are required to have permission of instructor to register for the course. No other prerequisites are required.

2842HMRT.3523.A
Moot Court III
Dipaolo O'Brien, AmandaW02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.201
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Moot court cultivates advanced analytical skills while developing leadership qualities in students with an interest in human rights. Students learn how to develop and deliver oral legal arguments by competing in a Supreme Court simulation where they answer questions from a panel of judges. Students focus on Supreme Court precedent surrounding two different issues each year. Students are required to have permission of instructor to register for the course. No other prerequisites are required.

2845HMRT.3603.A1
Thesis Proposal
Dipaolo O'Brien, AmandaT TH10:00AM-11:20AMMMH.204
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The purpose of this course is to guide students interested in writing an honours thesis through their initial research process. Students will develop a thesis statement, examine their methodology, conduct a literature review and write a substantial annotated bibliography. Classes will be held throughout the term to assess progress towards the completion of the proposal. A completed thesis proposal is required before moving on in the honours program.

2846HMRT.3633.A
Gender Expression
Ripley, AJM W F11:30AM-12:20PMJDH.G5
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This course explores the socially constructed customs and structures of society that enables the legal regulation of gender identity and human sexuality by exploring the history, policies and norms that shapes government action. Basic theories of gender and sexuality studies will be explored before critically examining the same theories in practice through case studies. This course will also explore a variety of other identity issues such as race, age, disability, and class intertwine with gender and sexuality identities. We will also examine how experiences and identities shape the ways in which people resist inequality and lobby for change. This course will enable students to critically evaluate legislative and judicial responses to human sexuality and gender expression.

2847HMRT.4013.A
Capstone Seminar
Szurlej, ChristinaT02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.102
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This course will consist of an in-depth investigation of one or more human rights problems. The specific topic will change from year to year. Students will be expected to examine the issue(s) in light of their knowledge of the basic instruments, institutions, and ideas relevant to human rights as well as their understanding of the fundamental questions of value that surround contemporary social issues. The course is normally reserved for students in their final year of the human rights Major.

3350INTR.4016.A1
Interdis. Honours Thesis
Gillies, James-.
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The student, in consultation with her or his Advisory Committee, will submit a thesis proposal to the Interdisciplinary Steering Committee by the end of the third year of studies. The honours thesis is written in the fourth year of studies with guidance from the student's Programme Director.

2405IRSH.2006.A1
Intro. to Irish Studies
Nolan, LorraineM04:00PM-06:50PMECH.223
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A general introduction to Irish society and culture. This course will provide an overview of the unique characteristics of the island and its people. Students will have the opportunity to familiarize themselves with aspects of Ireland's land, cultural development, economy, politics, and literature.

2399IRSH.2173.A
Irish Language and Culture I
Smith, IanW F09:00AM-10:20AMGMH.207
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Students will study the Irish Language, learning through exercises the four language learning skills: speaking, reading, writing and listening. There will an emphasis on the Irish spoken currently in Ireland today, supplemented by insights into modern Irish society and culture. Students will also learn about the linguistic composition of Ireland as a bilingual nation and how the Irish-speaking community has survived and continues to survive amidst a large dominant Irish Anglophone majority. No previous knowledge of Irish is required.

2844ITAL.1006.A1
Introduction to Italian
Temelini, MarkM W F12:30PM-01:20PMECH.G11
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[Italian]Introduction to the Italian Language. Phonetics, oral training, and conversation. Basic grammar with oral and written exercises. Basic reading and composition. Introduction to Italian civilization with the aid of audio-visual techniques.

2929ITAL.2013.A
Intermediate Italian I
Temelini, MarkM W F01:30PM-02:20PMECH.G11
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[Italian]This course proceeds to further develop the acquisition of grammar, vocabulary, and language skills. The practice of listening, speaking, reading, and writing will give students the opportunity to improve their use of the language. Aspects of Italian culture are presented through audio-visual aids in order to enhance the connection to the learning language process.

2572JOUR.1113.A
Fundamentals of Effective Writ
Lee, PhilipT TH11:30AM-12:50PMMMH.106
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[1. Journalism]Vigorous and clear writing is the foundation for all forms of digital journalism and new media production. This writing intensive course develops fundamental skills for effective writing and storytelling. This is a required course for all students pursuing a major in Digital Journalism and New Media.

2578JOUR.1113.B
Fundamentals of Effective Writ
Camp, MichaelW07:00PM-09:50PMMMH.308
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[1. Journalism]Vigorous and clear writing is the foundation for all forms of digital journalism and new media production. This writing intensive course develops fundamental skills for effective writing and storytelling. This is a required course for all students pursuing a major in Digital Journalism and New Media.

2579JOUR.2063.A
Media, Ethics and the Law
Camp, MichaelT TH11:30AM-12:50PMMMH.308
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[1. Journalism]This course will introduce students to the freedoms and responsibilities of journalists in Canada. Topics include press freedom and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, publication bans, defamation, confidentiality of sources, investigative reporting and the law. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of court reporting.

2580JOUR.2113.A
The Toolbox I - New Media
Dickson, DonaldT TH02:30PM-03:50PMCBC.CBC
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[1. Journalism] This course introduces students to multi-media storytelling, including recording and editing sound and video.

2581JOUR.3013.A
Through the Lens
Dickson, DonaldM W02:30PM-03:50PMCBC.CBC
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[1. Journalism] This course will explore the use of photography and video in new media, and how stories are told through the lens.

2582JOUR.3153.A
Digital Journalism
Tunney, MarkM04:00PM-06:50PMCBC.CBC
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[1. Journalism] This course explores developments in digital journalism that have fundamentally changed the nature of publishing and journalism, and the role of journalism in the new media landscape. Prerequisite: JOUR 2123 or permission of professor.

2529JOUR.4106.A1
Senior Seminar in Journalism
Lee, PhilipM02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.309
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[1. Journalism] Students will produce community-based digital journalism projects supervised by faculty and explore the ethics of producing journalism in the public interest.

2545JOUR.4116.A1
Journalism in the Field
Lee, PhilipTH02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.309
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[1. Journalism] Students will pursue experiential learning opportunities in journalism. These opportunities might include work in the student press, a professional newsroom, or the creation of a new digital publication.

2422JPNS.1013.A
Introductory Japanese I
Nishijima, MichikoM W02:30PM-03:50PMGMH.207
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Focuses on the fundamental structure of Japanese and practice of communication skills. Introduces Hiragana and Katakana, writing systems in Japanese, and practice of reading and writing. Some aspects of Japanese culture are discussed. Not open to native speakers.

2423JPNS.2013.A
Japanese II, Part 1
Nishijima, MichikoM W04:00PM-05:20PMGMH.207
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This course aims to develop the communicative skills necessary for everyday situations. It focuses on both conversation and writing systems, expanding vocabulary and sentence structures, teaching students to express themselves on a wide range of topics from daily life. One hundred kanji characters are introduced and practiced.

2914LATI.1013.A
Introduction to Latin I
James, ArthurT TH10:00AM-11:20AMGMH.204
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[Latin]This is an intensive introduction to classical Latin for students with no previous background in the language and provides them with an introduction to the basic rules of grammar, vocabulary, and reading skills.

2711MATH.1013.A
Introduction to Calculus I
Gupta, SaritaT TH11:30AM-12:50PMECH.G14
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A review of analytic geometry and functions; derivatives of algebraic functions; mean value theorem; fundamental theorem of calculus; applications of differentiation, including extreme values and related rates; integration; differentials. Three hours of lecture and one tutorial per week. Prerequisite: grade 12 mathematics or equivalent.

2712MATH.2213.A
Linear Algebra
Abbandonato, ChristopherT TH08:30AM-09:50AMGMH.205
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Matrices and determinants; vectors in R2 and R3; real finite-dimensional vector spaces and linear transformations; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; complex vector spaces and inner product spaces; unitary and Hermitian matrices. Prerequisite: MATH 1023 or MATH 1033 or consent of the instructor.

2655NATI.1006.A1
Intro to Native Studies
Landry, MarkT07:00PM-09:50PMGMH.304
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of Native Studies. Its purpose is to increase the student's understanding and sensitivity towards the past and present experience of Native peoples. Using both oral and written records, the course will examine pre-contact history and culture, the influences of colonialism in the post-contact era, and contemporary issues.

2685NATI.2503.A
Research Strat. in Native Stud
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH02:30PM-03:50PMHCH.200
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Surveys various research strategies from Anthropology and Sociology and assesses their applicability to, and compatibility with, Native Studies. Considers special protocol and ethical questions in research on Native peoples. Prerequisite: NATI 1006 or by special permission of instructor.

2686NATI.3643.A
Mi'kmaq History
Landry, MarkW07:00PM-09:50PMGMH.304
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This course will explore the cultural, social, and political past of the Mi'kmaq People through archaeological, oral, visual, and material documentation, as well as primary and secondary written sources. Particular emphasis will be placed on understanding the Mi'kmaq form of life and how it has been affected by colonization. Class will also study how the perspective of different writers influences what gets recorded and taught as history. An important theme of the course will be the relevance of the past to the present. Class will consist of lectures and discussions with occasional films and speakers. Prerequisite: NATI 1006, Introduction to Native Studies.

2687NATI.3703.A
Indigen.Econ&The Idea Develop.
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH05:30PM-06:50PMHCH.200
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Examines indigenous economic cultures and the impact of western economic culture on traditional social organization and values. Looks closely at the fur trade, capitalism, industry, technology, and their effects on environment and indigenous cultures. Analyzes the development of dependency and the idea of economic development. Alternatives in which Native economic values provide the basis for viable economic endeavours will be considered.

2688NATI.3823.A
Native Peoples and Racism
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH04:00PM-05:20PMHCH.200
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The indigenous peoples of Canada are often included as an afterthought in academic works on racism, which tend to focus on Black-White relations. However, rather than being marginal to understanding the issues of race and racism, the early encounters between European and Native Americans are central to its proper understanding. The issues which arose from Columbus' explorations remain as central to understanding modern racism as they were to the creation of racist ideology in the first place, and the treatment of indigenous peoples in Canada today is shown to be a direct intellectual descendent of the material need to deny the humanity of other human beings.

2497PHIL.1013.A
Intro. to Philosophy I
Gilbert-Walsh, JamesT TH10:00AM-11:20AMGMH.304
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[1. Introductory]An introduction, through lecture, reading of original sources, and discussion, to the origins and development of western philosophy from its beginnings in ancient Greece through the Middle Ages. Authors read include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Thomas Aquinas. Themes: the nature of reality, the nature of human being and human knowledge; moral and political philosophy; the existence and nature of God.

2498PHIL.1013.B
Intro. to Philosophy I
Ranger, Jean-PhilippeT TH11:30AM-12:50PMBMH.103
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[1. Introductory]An introduction, through lecture, reading of original sources, and discussion, to the origins and development of western philosophy from its beginnings in ancient Greece through the Middle Ages. Authors read include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Thomas Aquinas. Themes: the nature of reality, the nature of human being and human knowledge; moral and political philosophy; the existence and nature of God.

2499PHIL.1033.A
Atheism: An Intro. to Phil.
Stapleford, ScottT TH01:00PM-02:20PMMMH.203
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[1. Introductory]This course is an introduction to philosophy focusing on atheism. Students will be introduced to the current debate, but will also consider what the great minds of the past can tell us about the existence or non-existence of God. We will draw on both historical and contemporary sources, developing skills of philosophical analysis in connection with a single, hotly disputed topic. This course has no prerequisite.

2501PHIL.2113.A
Ancient Phil. I
Ranger, Jean-PhilippeT TH02:30PM-03:50PMGMH.304
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[2. History of Philosophy] A lecture course surveying ancient philosophy from the Presocratics to Plato. Philosophers covered may include: Anaximander, Heraclitus, Parmenides, Empedocles, Anaxagoras, Democritus, Gorgias, Protagoras, Socrates and Plato. Through readings of original sources and ancient testimony, the course analyses key questions in ancient philosophy, e.g. what is philosophy and what does it achieve? What is nature? What is the best life? Prerequisites: Any two of PHIL 1013, 1023, 1033, 1043, 1053, 1063, or permission of the instructor.

2502PHIL.3613.A
Kant
Gilbert-Walsh, JamesT TH11:30AM-12:50PMHCH.200
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[5. Themes and Authors]In this course, we will focus primarily on Kant's Critique of Pure Reason as we work through the implications his position has for both theoretical and moral philosophy. Prerequisite: PHIL 2153 or 2163 or permission of the instructor.

2504PHIL.3633.A
Marx
Gilbert-Walsh, JamesT TH01:00PM-02:20PMHCH.200
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[5. Themes and Authors]This lecture course will involve a close reading of some of Karl Marx's most influential work. As we read through portions of The German Ideology, the Grundrisse, The Holy Family and Capital, we will consider 1) Marx's relationship with and response to his predecessors, and 2) his critical reassessment of philosophical and political practice, human nature, history and economic theory. Prerequistie: 9 credit hours in philosophy or permisson of the instructor.

2506PHIL.3683.A
Epistemology
Stapleford, ScottT TH10:00AM-11:20AMMMH.307
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[5. Themes and Authors]This course is devoted to a topic of current interest in contemporary epistemology. The topic for any particular year may be selected from: skepticism, a priori justification, internalism and externalism, epistemic duty, epistemic justification, the definition and conditions of knowledge, sources of knowledge, explanation, knowledge and natural science, naturalized epistemology, analyticity. The text for the course will be either a recent monograph or a collection of articles. Prerequisites: Any two of PHIL 1013, 1023, 1033, 1043, 1053, 1063, or permission of the instructor.

2787POLS.1103.A
Canadian Government
Horgan, GerardT TH01:00PM-02:20PMECH.G12
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[1. Introductory]This course provides an introduction to the concepts of the regime, authority, the rule of law, citizenship, and political obligation. It does so through a consideration of the institutions of Canadian government and covers the following topics: the framing of the constitution, federalism, parliamentary government, the Charter of Rights, the judiciary, political parties, public opinion, interest groups, and constitutional reform.

2784POLS.1103.B
Canadian Government
Ouellette, PhillippeTH07:00PM-09:50PMMMH.202
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[1. Introductory]This course provides an introduction to the concepts of the regime, authority, the rule of law, citizenship, and political obligation. It does so through a consideration of the institutions of Canadian government and covers the following topics: the framing of the constitution, federalism, parliamentary government, the Charter of Rights, the judiciary, political parties, public opinion, interest groups, and constitutional reform.

2797POLS.1603.A
Global Politics
Horgan, GerardT TH10:00AM-11:20AMECH.G12
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[1. Introductory]This course provides an introduction to the concepts of nation and state, sovereignty, forms of government, and political conflict. It does so through consideration of issues in world politics, such as human rights and social justice, ecological imbalance, economic inequalities, war, global governmental institutions and organizations.

2790POLS.1603.B
Global Politics
Masciulli, JosephM W F11:30AM-12:20PMJDH.G2
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[1. Introductory]This course provides an introduction to the concepts of nation and state, sovereignty, forms of government, and political conflict. It does so through consideration of issues in world politics, such as human rights and social justice, ecological imbalance, economic inequalities, war, global governmental institutions and organizations.

2809POLS.2303.A
Comp Politics Developed World
Horgan, GerardT TH04:00PM-05:20PMECH.120
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[3. Comparative Government and Politics]This course introduces students to the comparative study of governments in the industrial and post-industrial societies. It examines the question of how various political systems are classified, dealing with such issues as organization of the state, governance and policy-making, representation, and political legitimacy. Prerequisite: 3 credits in Political Science.

2810POLS.2613.A
International Relations I
Narine, ShaunM W F12:30PM-01:20PMMMH.203
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[4. International Relations and Foreign Policy]This course introduces students to International Relations theory, with a focus on the mainstream theories in the field, namely realism and its variants, liberalism and constructivism. These theories are illustrated and developed through the use of case studies and examinations of the institutions and structures of the international system. Prerequisite: POLS 1013 or permission of the instructor.

2811POLS.2803.A
Western Tradition I
Barry, ConorM W02:30PM-03:50PMMMH.202
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[5. Political Philosophy]This course will introduce students to seminal texts in political philosophy focussing on the ancient and early medieval period. Texts may include: Plato's Apology, Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics, Aristotle's Politics, Bible, and St. Augustine's City of God.

2812POLS.3203.A
Canadian Provincial Politics
Cochrane, DennisM04:00PM-06:50PMMMH.307
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[2. Canadian Government and Politics]The course offers a comparative view of the Canadian provinces. Provincial cabinets, party systems, legislative development, and economic and social issues are considered. Special attention is directed to the problem of Quebec in Confederation.

2776POLS.3306.A1
U.S. Government and Politics
Malcolmson, PatrickT TH11:30AM-12:50PMMMH.307
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[3. Comparative Government and Politics] This course examines the national political institutions of the United States of America - Congress, the Presidency, the Supreme Court, and the federal bureaucracy. Political parties, interest groups, elections, and the role of the media will also be studied. Issues surrounding the modern presidency, as well as those involving social and moral issues.

2813POLS.3523.A
Intern. Relations Asia/Pacific
Narine, ShaunT TH10:00AM-11:20AMHCH.200
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[4. International Relations and Foreign Policy]This course will focus on how the relations of the regional powers (China, Japan, and the United States) intersect and affect the shape of the Asia Pacific's politics and economics. The course will also provide an overview of the interactions between the other regional states and the various efforts to build Asia Pacific-wide economic and security institutions.

2814POLS.3533.A
Canadian Foreign Policy
Narine, ShaunW F09:00AM-10:20AMHCH.200
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[4. International Relations and Foreign Policy]This course is a study of Canada and its role in the world. It will focus, in particular, on the historical development of Canada's foreign policy and the continuities between the past and the present. Is Canada a principal power or is it highly constrained by the imperatives of its relationship with the United States? A significant component of the course will be spent in evaluating Canada's role in a post-Cold War and post-9/11 world. Particular attention will be paid to issues related to the question of multilateralism and Canada's evolving approach to this tradition. Prerequisite: POLS 2613 or POLS 2623 or permission of the instructor.

2830POLS.3613.A1
Model United Nations
McAnany, StephanieW07:00PM-09:50PMMMH.201
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[4. International Relations and Foreign Policy]This course will prepare students for participation in a Model United Nations, either Canadian or American sponsored. In a model UN simulation, students represent an assigned country's foreign policy on assigned issues on the UN agenda. The course will begin with an examination of the UN and its procedures. Subsequent topics will include researching the assigned UN issues and the assigned country's policy on them; preparation of working papers and motions, and strategies for effective conference participation. Fund raising for the trip required: half credit course, but meets first and second terms; limited enrolment.

3345POLS.4013.IS
Is: Methods of Pol. Inquiry
Dinan, Matthew-.
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[7. Independent Study]Students may undertake independent studies under the direction of a member or members of the Department with the permission of the Department Chair. The course is limited to students of proven academic merit. It is expected that the students will have a clear idea of their area of study, and they will be expected to submit a written proposal about it, including a preliminary bibliography, research topic, and argument justifying it as an independent course of study.

2815POLS.4803.A
Sem.in Political Philosophy
Malcolmson, PatrickW02:30PM-05:20PMHCH.5
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[5. Political Philosophy]This course will involve the intensive study of a theme or an author or authors in the history of political philosophy. Students will be expected to engage in advanced study and to make regular presentations to the class. Prerequisite: POLS 2803 and 2813 (or 2806) or permission of the instructor.

2816POLS.4903.A
Capstone Seminar
Malcolmson, PatrickT07:00PM-09:50PMHCH.5
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[6. Honours]This course is intended to serve as a capstone seminar for majors and Honours students in Political Science. The course is an investigation of the perennial issues involved in the study of politics. We shall examine critically the dominant approaches in Political Science with the aim of understanding how the method utilized affects the substance of any account of political phenomena.

2743PSYC.1013.A
Intro. to Psychology I
Fraser, IanM02:30PM-05:20PMJDH.G1
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, history of psychology, brain and behaviour, sensation and perception, learning, memory, and cognition.

2747PSYC.1013.B
Intro. to Psychology I
Gunn, CarlaM W F10:30AM-11:20AMMMH.308
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, history of psychology, brain and behaviour, sensation and perception, learning, memory, and cognition.

2750PSYC.1013.C
Intro. to Psychology I
Gunn, CarlaM W F11:30AM-12:20PMMMH.308
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, history of psychology, brain and behaviour, sensation and perception, learning, memory, and cognition.

2752PSYC.1013.D
Intro. to Psychology I
Gunn, CarlaT TH04:00PM-05:20PMMMH.308
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, history of psychology, brain and behaviour, sensation and perception, learning, memory, and cognition.

2754PSYC.1023.A
Intro. to Psychology II
Lafrance, MichelleT TH11:30AM-12:50PMJDH.G5
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, developmental psychology, intelligence and creativity, personality, abnormal behaviour and therapy, social psychology, and applied topics.

2755PSYC.1023.B
Intro. to Psychology II
Lafrance, MichelleT TH01:00PM-02:20PMJDH.G5
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, developmental psychology, intelligence and creativity, personality, abnormal behaviour and therapy, social psychology, and applied topics.

2756PSYC.1023.C
Intro. to Psychology II
Randall, HilaryM W F10:30AM-11:20AMBMH.101
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, developmental psychology, intelligence and creativity, personality, abnormal behaviour and therapy, social psychology, and applied topics.

2757PSYC.2013.A
Introduction to Statistics
Claybourn, MarvinM02:30PM-05:20PMBMH.102
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This course focuses on statistics used by psychologists to describe and analyze research data. Course content will include a comprehensive coverage of descriptive statistics and an introduction to inferential statistics and hypothesis testing procedures. Students must take 2013 in their second year.

2758PSYC.2013.B
Introduction to Statistics
Claybourn, MarvinT TH11:30AM-12:50PMGMH.304
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This course focuses on statistics used by psychologists to describe and analyze research data. Course content will include a comprehensive coverage of descriptive statistics and an introduction to inferential statistics and hypothesis testing procedures. Students must take 2013 in their second year.

2759PSYC.2023.A
Intro to Research Methods
Higgins, NancyT TH10:00AM-11:20AMECH.103
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This course focuses on methods used by psychologists to conduct research. Course content will include comprehensive coverage of the scientific method, the logic of experimental design, ethics, and report writing. In addition, students will be required to write research papers and may be asked to design and/or conduct their own research projects. Students must take 2023 in their second year.

2760PSYC.2023.B
Intro to Research Methods
Bourque, WendyW F09:00AM-10:20AMMMH.203
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This course focuses on methods used by psychologists to conduct research. Course content will include comprehensive coverage of the scientific method, the logic of experimental design, ethics, and report writing. In addition, students will be required to write research papers and may be asked to design and/or conduct their own research projects. Students must take 2023 in their second year.

2761PSYC.2113.A
Sensation
Bancroft, TylerT TH08:30AM-09:50AMBMH.103
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An introduction to the study of sensation. The emphasis will be on vision and hearing. The course will begin with an examination of the stimuli and the structure and function of the receptors. Other topics will include the psychophysical methods, sensory scaling, and a survey of data on several senses. These topics can be varied to suit the interests of the students.

2763PSYC.2123.A
Perception
Bourque, WendyM W F01:30PM-02:20PMMMH.203
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An introduction to the study of human perception. Emphasis will be on vision but hearing will also be discussed. Topics will include the perception of form, pattern recognition, constancy, attention and perceptual learning. Topics can be selected to meet the interests of the class.

2765PSYC.2153.A
Biological Psychology
Bancroft, TylerT TH10:00AM-11:20AMJDH.G2
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This course provides a general introduction to the physiological processes that underlie selected behaviours. Understanding of these biological processes is fundamental to many areas of psychology, including addictive behaviours and the relationship between stress and health.

2766PSYC.2163.A
Drugs and Behaviour
Bourque, WendyM W F11:30AM-12:20PMMMH.203
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This course will examine the measurable effects of drugs on naturally occurring and experimentally-controlled behaviour. Drug action will be evaluated based on its effects on the nervous system and behaviour. Social issues of drug use, such as addiction and legalization, will be covered. The mechanisms involved in psychotherapeutic uses of drugs, including their immediate and long-term effects, will also be reviewed.

2767PSYC.2183.A
Human Sexuality
Stelzl, MonikaM W02:30PM-03:50PMJDH.G2
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The course surveys topics in human sexuality that have attracted the attention of researchers and theorists from many different areas of psychology. Fundamental questions concerning the nature, development, and expression of human sexuality will be addressed along with specific issues of contemporary concern.

2768PSYC.2233.A
Psychology and the Law
Fraser, IanW02:30PM-05:20PMJDH.G1
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Psychology has a bearing on most aspects of the legal process. Increasingly, psychologists are being asked to share their knowledge with those in the judicial system. Topics may include: the reliability of eyewitness testimony, police interview techniques, the use of mug shots, and the use of line-up procedures.

2769PSYC.2263.A
Cognitive Psychology
Thomson, SandraT TH02:30PM-03:50PMJDH.G1
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This course will introduce students to current theories of human mental processes and the methods used to study them. Topics may include attention, memory, language comprehension and production, concepts, imagery, judgment, decision-making, and problem solving.

2770PSYC.2413.A
Social Psychology
Higgins, NancyT TH01:00PM-02:20PMECH.103
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This course will review a variety of topics within social psychology including social cognition and social perception, attitudes and attitude change, understanding the self, interpersonal attraction, persuasion, conformity, prejudice, aggression, and altruism.

2771PSYC.2413.B
Social Psychology
Randall, HilaryT TH08:30AM-09:50AMJDH.G1
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This course will review a variety of topics within social psychology including social cognition and social perception, attitudes and attitude change, understanding the self, interpersonal attraction, persuasion, conformity, prejudice, aggression, and altruism.

2772PSYC.2613.A
Developmental: Phys &Emotional
Prior, SuzanneT TH08:30AM-09:50AMJDH.205
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This course will cover various aspects of development including prenatal development, physical development from birth through puberty, motor development, emotional development, and the development of a sense of self and identity.

2774PSYC.2613.B
Developmental: Phys &Emotional
Randall, HilaryM W F12:30PM-01:20PMJDH.G1
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This course will cover various aspects of development including prenatal development, physical development from birth through puberty, motor development, emotional development, and the development of a sense of self and identity.

2777PSYC.2623.A
Developmental: Cognitive & Soc
Prior, SuzanneT TH11:30AM-12:50PMJDH.G1
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This course will cover age-related changes in language and cognition as well as the development of gender roles and schemas, moral development, peer relations, and the influence of such factors as families and the media.

2779PSYC.2643.A
Abnormal Psychology
Bowes, AndreaM W F11:30AM-12:20PMGMH.304
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This course examines issues in the diagnosis and treatment of the most common psychological disorders in adulthood. Students are introduced to the history of psychopathology, from primitive to modern times, which traces the development of biological, psychodynamic, behavioural, cognitive, and sociocultural models of abnormality. Possible topics include: anxiety disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenia, and personality disorders.

2781PSYC.2643.B
Abnormal Psychology
Costello, LeslieTH07:00PM-09:50PMJDH.G1
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This course examines issues in the diagnosis and treatment of the most common psychological disorders in adulthood. Students are introduced to the history of psychopathology, from primitive to modern times, which traces the development of biological, psychodynamic, behavioural, cognitive, and sociocultural models of abnormality. Possible topics include: anxiety disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenia, and personality disorders.

2783PSYC.3213.A
Behaviour Modification
Korotkov, DavidT TH01:00PM-02:20PMGMH.301
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A survey of the application of principles of respondent and operant conditioning derived from laboratory and clinical settings. Behavioural and cognitive-behavioural research on the use of these principles in various settings (e.g., home, schools, institutions) will be discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 2213.

2785PSYC.3213.B
Behaviour Modification
Korotkov, DavidT TH02:30PM-03:50PMGMH.301
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A survey of the application of principles of respondent and operant conditioning derived from laboratory and clinical settings. Behavioural and cognitive-behavioural research on the use of these principles in various settings (e.g., home, schools, institutions) will be discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 2213.

2786PSYC.3223.A
Health Psychology
Korotkov, DavidT TH10:00AM-11:20AMJDH.G1
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This course will review a variety of topics within health psychology, including stress, coping and health, pain, chronic illness, the physician-patient relationship and health care, as well as the impact of various health behaviours such as smoking, drinking, and exercise on health status.

2788PSYC.3273.A
Human Memory
Thomson, SandraT TH11:30AM-12:50PMECH.103
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This course will examine theories of human memory and information processing with emphasis on contemporary research in the field. Topics to be covered include short-term memory and long-term memory, encoding and retrieval processes, forgetting, implicit memory, amnesia, autobiographical memory, and memory across the lifespan. Prerequisite: PSYC 2263 or permission of instructor.

2789PSYC.3933.A
Advanced Statistics
Claybourn, MarvinT TH02:30PM-03:50PMJDH.205
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This course focuses on advanced statistical procedures for analyzing psychological data. Topics covered include analysis of variance, post hoc multiple comparisons, correlation, and regression. Prerequisite: PSYC 2013 and 2023.

2791PSYC.3963.A
History of Psychology
Nicholson, IanT TH08:30AM-09:50AMJDH.G5
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This course is a general introduction to the history of psychology. We will explore some of the intellectual, social, and institutional reasons that psychology emerged when and where it did. Areas to be investigated include Wundt's contributions, functionalism, and behaviourism. Special attention will be given to the late 19th and early 20th centuries, because decisions were made then that affect us even today. Prerequisites: PSYC 2013 and 2023 or permission of the instructor.

2792PSYC.4223.A
Seminar in Psyc and Law
Fraser, IanT TH04:00PM-05:20PMHCH.5
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Psychological science impacts on most aspects of the legal process and psychologists are increasingly being asked to participate by providing knowledge to this system. This seminar course examines the application of psychological science to the justice system. Topics may include reliability of eyewitness testimony, repressed memories and the courts, children as eyewitnesses, psychological disorders and their effects on witness reliability. Prerequisites: PSYC 2013, 2023 and PYSC 2233, or permission of the instructor.

2794PSYC.4493.A
Seminar: Men and Masculinity
Nicholson, IanT02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.201
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This course critically explores the contemporary male and masculine roles in 21st century society. The course is designed to acquaint students with current understandings of men from the psychological perspective and to help students better understand themselves or a male in their lives. Topics may include father-son relationships, mother-son relationships, fathering, relationships with men, relationships with women, husbanding, emotional expressiveness, aggression and war, sexuality, gender differences, work, solitude, sports and rites of passage. No prerequisite.

2795PSYC.4513.A
Seminar in Popular Psychology
Bancroft, TylerT TH01:00PM-02:20PMMMH.201
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This course examines the development and contemporary significance of popular psychology. Topics may include the social origins of popular psychology; such 18th and 19th century psychological movements as mesmerism, phrenology, and spiritualism; and such contemporary forms of popular psychology as self-help books, talk shows, and support groups. Students will be encouraged to evaluate critically the current popularization of psychology and to explore the relationship between popular and academic psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 3963 is recommended prior to taking this course.

2731PSYC.4996.A1
Honours Thesis
Stelzl, MonikaM W F12:30PM-01:20PMECH.320
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The student will conduct an individual research project with guidance from the Department. Some classes will be held to acquaint Honours candidates with problems in research design. PSYC 2013, 2023, 3933 and 3943 are prerequisites. A minimum grade of B is required in each of these courses.

2706RELG.1006.A1
Intro to Religious Studies
Simon, DerekM W F10:30AM-11:20AMGMH.207
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[I. Introductory Course]A thematic, issues-oriented introduction to the study of religions. Some of the themes and issues explored may include social crisis and renewal, authority and power, sexual diversity, conflict and peace, evil and suffering, death and after death, food and music, among others. By means of these themes, students develop an active appreciation of diverse religious traditions and gain the tools to think critically about them.

2715RELG.1006.B1
Intro to Religious Studies
Simon, DerekT TH01:00PM-02:20PMGMH.204
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[I. Introductory Course]A thematic, issues-oriented introduction to the study of religions. Some of the themes and issues explored may include social crisis and renewal, authority and power, sexual diversity, conflict and peace, evil and suffering, death and after death, food and music, among others. By means of these themes, students develop an active appreciation of diverse religious traditions and gain the tools to think critically about them.

2719RELG.1006.C1
Intro to Religious Studies
Dunham, ScottW F09:00AM-10:20AMECH.103
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[I. Introductory Course]A thematic, issues-oriented introduction to the study of religions. Some of the themes and issues explored may include social crisis and renewal, authority and power, sexual diversity, conflict and peace, evil and suffering, death and after death, food and music, among others. By means of these themes, students develop an active appreciation of diverse religious traditions and gain the tools to think critically about them.

2724RELG.2133.A
Religion & Ecology
Simon, DerekM W F12:30PM-01:20PMJDH.205
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[II. Intermediate and Advanced Courses|1. Multi-Religious Courses]Many religious traditions display a variety of stances towards the environmental crisis, ranging from indifference to reform. Through critical and comparative study, this course explores religious approaches to ecology in a variety of traditions. Topics may include environmental stewardship, deep ecology, ecoliberation, ecofeminism and ethnic indigenous ecology.

2725RELG.2333.A
Intro to the New Testament
Simon, DerekM W04:00PM-05:20PMJDH.205
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[II. Intermediate and Advanced Courses|2. Tradition-Specific Courses]This course will investigate the history of the growth of the New Testament Canon of twenty seven books and then study two major categories of New Testament books: the Gospels and the Pauline Corpus. Several special questions including the Synoptic Question, the relationship between John and the Synoptics and the authenticity of the Pauline Corpus will be briefly introduced.

3087SCWK.5013.A
Group Work Theory and Design
Duffett-Weeks, HeatherW TH F08:30AM-04:30PMTBA.TBA
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[Post-Degree Courses]This is a laboratory course in which students will develop skills in group membership, leadership, and programme design. Practical group experiences and reflection activities are utilized to demonstrate theories of group dynamics and development, and to enhance group assessment and intervention skills. Note: This course is delivered in two separate modules; the first at the beginning of the program, and the second module at the beginning of the second semester.

3089SCWK.5013.B
Group Work Theory and Design
Baldwin, CliveW TH F08:30AM-04:30PMTBA.TBA
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[Post-Degree Courses]This is a laboratory course in which students will develop skills in group membership, leadership, and programme design. Practical group experiences and reflection activities are utilized to demonstrate theories of group dynamics and development, and to enhance group assessment and intervention skills. Note: This course is delivered in two separate modules; the first at the beginning of the program, and the second module at the beginning of the second semester.

3090SCWK.5013.C
Group Work Theory and Design
McGeachy, JanetW TH F08:30AM-04:30PMTBA.TBA
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[Post-Degree Courses]This is a laboratory course in which students will develop skills in group membership, leadership, and programme design. Practical group experiences and reflection activities are utilized to demonstrate theories of group dynamics and development, and to enhance group assessment and intervention skills. Note: This course is delivered in two separate modules; the first at the beginning of the program, and the second module at the beginning of the second semester.

3121SCWK.5013.MMD
Group Work Theory and Design
McGeachy, Janet-TBA.TBA
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[Post-Degree Courses]This is a laboratory course in which students will develop skills in group membership, leadership, and programme design. Practical group experiences and reflection activities are utilized to demonstrate theories of group dynamics and development, and to enhance group assessment and intervention skills. Note: This course is delivered in two separate modules; the first at the beginning of the program, and the second module at the beginning of the second semester.

3122SCWK.5013.MME
Group Work Theory and Design
deVink, Sandra-TBA.TBA
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[Post-Degree Courses]This is a laboratory course in which students will develop skills in group membership, leadership, and programme design. Practical group experiences and reflection activities are utilized to demonstrate theories of group dynamics and development, and to enhance group assessment and intervention skills. Note: This course is delivered in two separate modules; the first at the beginning of the program, and the second module at the beginning of the second semester.

3092SCWK.5023.A
The Prof. of Scwk in Context
Wilkins, BarbaraTH09:00AM-12:00PMBMH.204
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[Post-Degree Courses]This is a mandatory course for all students upon entry into the BSW program. It introduces students to the foundations of the BSW program, and provides broad conceptual frameworks for a critical understanding of social work in Canadian contexts. The course is an introduction to the purpose, history, values, ethics, and methods of professional social work practice, and to the social welfare system that influences this practice. The scope of generalist practice with a range of populations in diverse settings will be explored.

3093SCWK.5023.B
The Prof. of Scwk in Context
Wilkins, BarbaraF09:00AM-12:00PMTBA.TBA
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[Post-Degree Courses]This is a mandatory course for all students upon entry into the BSW program. It introduces students to the foundations of the BSW program, and provides broad conceptual frameworks for a critical understanding of social work in Canadian contexts. The course is an introduction to the purpose, history, values, ethics, and methods of professional social work practice, and to the social welfare system that influences this practice. The scope of generalist practice with a range of populations in diverse settings will be explored.

3120SCWK.5023.MM
The Prof. of Scwk in Context
Hanson, Merri-LeeM08:30AM-12:00PMTBA.TBA
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[Post-Degree Courses]This is a mandatory course for all students upon entry into the BSW program. It introduces students to the foundations of the BSW program, and provides broad conceptual frameworks for a critical understanding of social work in Canadian contexts. The course is an introduction to the purpose, history, values, ethics, and methods of professional social work practice, and to the social welfare system that influences this practice. The scope of generalist practice with a range of populations in diverse settings will be explored.

3094SCWK.5036.A
Theory for Social Work Pract.I
Lewey, LaurelT TH01:30PM-04:30PMBMH.108
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[Post-Degree Courses]This is a mandatory course for all post-degree BSW students. A central assumption of this course is that social work as a profession needs to be self-critical in order to guard against continuing and increasing oppression experienced by members of various groups as they access social welfare programmes and social work intervention. Therefore a critical analysis of social welfare, social services and social work practice (primarily in the Canadian context) will be a central focus in the course.

3095SCWK.5036.B
Theory for Social Work Pract.I
Allison, Anne-DreaT TH01:30PM-04:30PMBMH.204
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[Post-Degree Courses]This is a mandatory course for all post-degree BSW students. A central assumption of this course is that social work as a profession needs to be self-critical in order to guard against continuing and increasing oppression experienced by members of various groups as they access social welfare programmes and social work intervention. Therefore a critical analysis of social welfare, social services and social work practice (primarily in the Canadian context) will be a central focus in the course.

3123SCWK.5036.MM1
Theory for Social Work Pract.I
Dupre, Marilyn-TBA.TBA
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[Post-Degree Courses]This is a mandatory course for all post-degree BSW students. A central assumption of this course is that social work as a profession needs to be self-critical in order to guard against continuing and increasing oppression experienced by members of various groups as they access social welfare programmes and social work intervention. Therefore a critical analysis of social welfare, social services and social work practice (primarily in the Canadian context) will be a central focus in the course.

3100SCWK.5083.A
Field Instruction II
Lewey, LaurelM T W09:00AM-12:00PMTBA.TBA
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[Post-Degree Courses]This course is a continuation of the Field Instruction I course. It will provide practical experience in the field, in an approved setting, two days per week. Students are expected to develop knowledge and skills in small teams utilizing a community based approach to practice under the supervision of faculty liaison. Prerequisite: Field Instruction I. Available to Post-Degree BSW students only.

3101SCWK.5083.B
Field Instruction II
Weeks, MurrayM T W09:00AM-12:00PMTBA.TBA
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[Post-Degree Courses]This course is a continuation of the Field Instruction I course. It will provide practical experience in the field, in an approved setting, two days per week. Students are expected to develop knowledge and skills in small teams utilizing a community based approach to practice under the supervision of faculty liaison. Prerequisite: Field Instruction I. Available to Post-Degree BSW students only.

3102SCWK.5083.C
Field Instruction II
Friars, GailaM T W09:00AM-12:00PMTBA.TBA
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[Post-Degree Courses]This course is a continuation of the Field Instruction I course. It will provide practical experience in the field, in an approved setting, two days per week. Students are expected to develop knowledge and skills in small teams utilizing a community based approach to practice under the supervision of faculty liaison. Prerequisite: Field Instruction I. Available to Post-Degree BSW students only.

3103SCWK.5083.D
Field Instruction II
McGeachy, JanetM T W09:00AM-12:00PMTBA.TBA
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[Post-Degree Courses]This course is a continuation of the Field Instruction I course. It will provide practical experience in the field, in an approved setting, two days per week. Students are expected to develop knowledge and skills in small teams utilizing a community based approach to practice under the supervision of faculty liaison. Prerequisite: Field Instruction I. Available to Post-Degree BSW students only.

3104SCWK.5083.E
Field Instruction II
Wilkins, BarbaraM T W09:00AM-12:00PMTBA.TBA
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[Post-Degree Courses]This course is a continuation of the Field Instruction I course. It will provide practical experience in the field, in an approved setting, two days per week. Students are expected to develop knowledge and skills in small teams utilizing a community based approach to practice under the supervision of faculty liaison. Prerequisite: Field Instruction I. Available to Post-Degree BSW students only.

3096SCWK.5116.A
Generalist Scwk Pract. Skills
Hotte, JenniM W09:00AM-12:00PMBMH.204
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[Post-Degree Courses]This course is an introduction to the theory and skills of helping individuals and families. The course will focus on understanding the stages of the helping process, ethics, and the acquisition of specific skills in communicating, assessing problems, planning, contracting, implementing change, and terminating the process. In addition, the course will include theory and skills related to practice situations that arise in almost all social work contexts - family interviews, grief work, crisis intervention, and work with people from cultures, religions and orientation other than one's own. The skills of writing social work records will be emphasized.

3097SCWK.5116.B
Generalist Scwk Pract. Skills
Wilkins, BarbaraM W09:00AM-12:00PMBMH.108
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[Post-Degree Courses]This course is an introduction to the theory and skills of helping individuals and families. The course will focus on understanding the stages of the helping process, ethics, and the acquisition of specific skills in communicating, assessing problems, planning, contracting, implementing change, and terminating the process. In addition, the course will include theory and skills related to practice situations that arise in almost all social work contexts - family interviews, grief work, crisis intervention, and work with people from cultures, religions and orientation other than one's own. The skills of writing social work records will be emphasized.

3098SCWK.5213.A
Fundamentals of Comm. Organ.
Jamal, AamirM01:30PM-04:30PMBMH.204
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[Post-Degree Courses]This course introduces students to the theory and practice of community organization. It provides a beginning knowledge base and skills for facilitating social change in the context of community. Content areas include the nature of community, the process of community organizing, strategies such as social action, diversity and social change, and the role of the community worker.

3099SCWK.5213.B
Fundamentals of Comm. Organ.
Jamal, AamirT09:00AM-12:00PMBMH.204
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[Post-Degree Courses]This course introduces students to the theory and practice of community organization. It provides a beginning knowledge base and skills for facilitating social change in the context of community. Content areas include the nature of community, the process of community organizing, strategies such as social action, diversity and social change, and the role of the community worker.

3105SCWK.5323.A
Social Policy-Issues & Global
Jamal, AamirF09:00AM-12:00PMBMH.204
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[Post-Degree Courses]This course will provide an opportunity for students to develop a beginning awareness, sensitivity, and understanding of the scope and impact of global or international issues on the lives of people in other parts of the world and our own lives, as well as on social policies and social work practice at all levels. As well, this course will explore the efforts of organizations (at the local, national, and international levels) which address international concerns.

3106SCWK.5323.B
Social Policy-Issues & Global
Jamal, AamirTH09:00AM-12:00PMBMH.108
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[Post-Degree Courses]This course will provide an opportunity for students to develop a beginning awareness, sensitivity, and understanding of the scope and impact of global or international issues on the lives of people in other parts of the world and our own lives, as well as on social policies and social work practice at all levels. As well, this course will explore the efforts of organizations (at the local, national, and international levels) which address international concerns.

3107SCWK.5723.A
Child Welfare
Matthews, Peter-TBA.TBA
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[Post-Degree Courses]This course is designed to introduce students to the child welfare system in New Brunswick and Canada, and to examine the policies, procedures, and practices which have been developed to respond to the needs of children and adolescents. As such, another purpose of the course is to critique existing policies, procedures, and practices and to discuss ways in which the child welfare delivery system could be more responsive to the needs of children and their families. Alternative responses and innovative programmes will be examined and students will be challenged to be creative in developing ideas which would lead to evolving the child welfare system in the direction of better meeting children's needs.

3108SCWK.5853.A
Mental Health Issues
Duffett-Weeks, Heather-TBA.TBA
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[Post-Degree Courses]This course examines mental health issues encountered by the professional with an emphasis on practice and policy implications. Students will have an opportunity to explore the context of practice from an historical perspective and to critically examine the current mental health delivery system in New Brunswick. The role of the professional and professional interventions will be examined.

3109SCWK.5863.A
Social Work and Addictions
Weeks, Murray-TBA.TBA
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[Post-Degree Courses]In this course, students will develop an understanding of the components of substance abuse as well as the addictive process. Topics will include the various mood-altering drugs, the components of early identification, assessment and treatment, harm reduction, and health promotion programmes.

3110SCWK.5923.A
Trauma & Social Work Practice
Hiscock, Laura-TBA.TBA
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[Post-Degree Courses]This is an elective course for all BSW students. This course provides an introduction to social work practice with individuals, families, groups and communities who are coping with the impact of trauma in their lives. The goals of this course involve students developing and demonstrating a critical understanding of trauma theory in its historical, political and social contexts; knowledge of practice approaches to trauma work; application of this knowledge through assessment and beginning intervention skills; and self-awareness in relation to traumatic material. Exploration of trauma theory beyond the dominant individualized, westernized, and medical model will be emphasized in the course. Ethical issues and exploration of personal and professional values, as they pertain to trauma work, will be incorporated into class material.

2926SOCI.1006.A1
Introduction to Sociology
Allain, KristiM W F10:30AM-11:20AMJDH.G2
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

2928SOCI.1006.B1
Introduction to Sociology
Fredericks, ErinM W F11:30AM-12:20PMECH.120
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

2931SOCI.1006.C1
Introduction to Sociology
Allain, KristiM W F12:30PM-01:20PMMMH.308
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

2933SOCI.1006.D1
Introduction to Sociology
Luke, AlisonM W02:30PM-03:50PMMMH.203
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

2936SOCI.1006.E1
Introduction to Sociology
Caliskan, GulhanimT TH10:00AM-11:20AMBMH.103
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

2938SOCI.1006.F1
Introduction to Sociology
McCoy, RobertT TH11:30AM-12:50PMJDH.G2
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

2968SOCI.2013.A
Research Design
Seifert, RoisinM W02:30PM-03:50PMBMH.103
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An introduction to the main research approaches used in sociology. The course includes practical experience in developing a research program by considering research question development, research design, methods of data collection, research ethics and data analysis. Of particular interest are the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches.

2967SOCI.2023.A
Introduction to Statistics
Luke, AlisonM W F12:30PM-01:20PMBMH.103
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Statistics are used and misused by social scientists, policy makers, and the media to describe the social world. Sociologists use statistics to understand social inequality and examine relations of power. In this course you examine the use and meaning of statistics in sociology, social policy and popular media to increase your ability to differentiate dodgy statistics from valid evidence. Note: To fulfill requirements for the Minor, Major or Honours in sociology, students may take this course or any other statistics course.

3055SOCI.2033.A
Classical Sociological Theory
Kelly, ColmT TH04:00PM-05:20PMJDH.205
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A study of the classical tradition in sociological thought focusing on those theorists whose ideas constitute the foundation of contemporary sociological analysis. This will include a consideration of the work of Marx, Weber, Durkheim, among others.

3056SOCI.2033.B
Classical Sociological Theory
Hayes, MatthewT TH10:00AM-11:20AMJDH.G5
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A study of the classical tradition in sociological thought focusing on those theorists whose ideas constitute the foundation of contemporary sociological analysis. This will include a consideration of the work of Marx, Weber, Durkheim, among others.

2924SOCI.2116.A1
Sociology of Atlantic Canada
Curtis Maillet, DonnaW F09:00AM-10:20AMMMH.202
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This course is designed as an introduction to the sociological study of Atlantic Canada. The first term focuses on the development of the Maritimes and Newfoundland from mercantile societies to under-developed regions within the centralized Canadian economy. The second term focuses on the contemporary structure, problems, and issues of Atlantic Canadian society.

2966SOCI.2313.A
Deviance
Rawlinson, EdM W F11:30AM-12:20PMBMH.102
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This course reviews theory and research with a focus on the social basis of deviance, deviance construction, and the consequences of social reactions to selected forms of deviance.

2922SOCI.2416.A1
Inequality in Society
Fleming, MichaelT TH08:30AM-09:50AMBMH.101
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This course explores existing patterns of social inequality and debates concerning the possibility and desirability of greater equality. Taking a theoretical and historical focus, this course examines the changing nature of inequality in contemporary Canadian society in the context of globalization. Throughout, we develop our understanding of how different forms of inequality - particularly social class, gender and race - intersect. One section of the course may have a service learning requirement, where students engage in volunteer work in the community, and then reflect upon their experiences through reading, writing, and discussion.

2965SOCI.2423.A
Social Problems I
Rawlinson, EdT TH01:00PM-02:20PMBMH.101
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The various perspectives used by sociologists to examine social problems will be described and evaluated. Concrete social problems will be used as examples of these perspectives.

2964SOCI.2563.A
Sociology of Sport
Hersey, CorinneT TH11:30AM-12:50PMECH.G12
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This course unpacks issues associated with sport in North America. Students are asked to critically engage with sport practices as they intersect various social phenomena including identity, nationalism, the body, colonialism, and the family. Students examine how power operates through the practices associated with sport and consider the potential, and consequences, of using sport for social change.

2963SOCI.2633.A
Sociology of the Family
Hersey, CorinneM07:00PM-09:50PMECH.G12
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A critical analysis of various conceptual frameworks in family research, and a cross-cultural analysis of marriage and the family, both past and present is pursued. Particular attention is paid to the current developments in marriage arrangements, changes in the meaning of marriage and the family, as well as the future of the family.

2960SOCI.3113.A
Political Sociology
Fleming, MichaelM W F10:30AM-11:20AMMMH.202
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The focus of this course is on the type of political system known as liberal democracy. Particular emphasis is placed on the historical genesis of liberal democracy, on its structural dynamics, and on the role of the working class within the system. The examination includes an analysis of the sources of stability and cleavage governing the development of liberal democracies. Finally, the functioning of liberal democracies is contrasted with that of communist political systems.

2959SOCI.3123.A
Social Movements
Hersey, CorinneT TH08:30AM-09:50AMGMH.204
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The emphasis of this course is on one specific type of social movement - movements of political protest. Two sorts of questions are emphasized: (1) the structural conditions conducive to the development of movements of political protest and (2) the factors conditioning the actual mobilization of protest. Although the social movements examined are diverse, ranging from the Rumanian rebellion in 1907 to the rebellion of 1837 in Upper Canada, special emphasis is placed on the almost simultaneous appearance of both left and right wing populist protest in Western Canada.

2958SOCI.3223.A
Globalization and Gender
Caliskan, GulhanimT02:30PM-05:20PMECH.G11
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Globalization and Gender examines how definitions of gender and sexuality are reproduced, negotiated and deployed in the context of globalization and transnational flows. Through a critical inquiry into a variety of theoretical texts, ethnographic case studies and analysis of media representation, students examine the topics of citizenship, global labor flows, migration, militarization, neoliberalism and the construction of the gendered global subject. They study both the opportunities and challenges that are inherent in postcolonial and transnational feminist scholarship and activism.

2957SOCI.3513.A
Sociology of Education
Weeks, PeterW F09:00AM-10:20AMECH.320
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This course focuses on the nature of the relationship between school systems and the broader societies of which they are a part. This is done with two purposes in mind: (1) to determine both the structural configuration and the functions of education in contemporary society and (2) to demonstrate the effects of this relationship on the internal functioning of schools. A variety of theoretical perspectives on the conceptualization of the school-society connection are examined.

2956SOCI.3693.A
Discourse and Society
Weeks, PeterM W04:00PM-05:20PMGMH.204
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Discourse analysis is the study of language in use, and is thus distinguished from approaches that treat language formally and structurally, as an abstract system of signs and symbols. We examine instances of written and spoken language that occurs in a wide range of contexts, including: everyday conversations among friends, encounters between professionals and clients, the activities of creating, disseminating and consuming mass-mediated texts, and governmental and corporate settings where policies are established, monitored and changed. Combining a theoretical and practical orientation, the course draws primarily on the work of sociologists, but also includes that done by scholars in disciplines such as sociolinguistics, psychology, anthropology, semiotics and literary studies. A basic premise of the course is that in our so-called information or knowledge-based global society, a critical awareness of discursive practices is becoming a prerequisite for democratic citizenship.

2954SOCI.4013.A
Senior Seminar
Hayes, MatthewT TH02:30PM-03:50PMECH.124
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The senior seminar is a one-semester course, required for a Major degree in sociology, which is to be taken in the final year of study. The course is organized around substantive issues, with different sections devoted to different topics. The issues are addressed as puzzles or lines of inquiry that explore current concerns. Students are expected to bring the knowledge they have acquired of the competing traditions of sociological inquiry to bear on the theme. This course will be conducted as a seminar, with students taking responsibility for researching, presenting, and discussing material. Regular attendance and active participation will be emphasized. Enrolment limited to approximately 15 students in each section.

2955SOCI.4013.B
Senior Seminar
Caliskan, GulhanimTH02:30PM-05:20PMECH.G11
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The senior seminar is a one-semester course, required for a Major degree in sociology, which is to be taken in the final year of study. The course is organized around substantive issues, with different sections devoted to different topics. The issues are addressed as puzzles or lines of inquiry that explore current concerns. Students are expected to bring the knowledge they have acquired of the competing traditions of sociological inquiry to bear on the theme. This course will be conducted as a seminar, with students taking responsibility for researching, presenting, and discussing material. Regular attendance and active participation will be emphasized. Enrolment limited to approximately 15 students in each section.

2951SOCI.4023.A
Honours Workshop
Machum, SusanT02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.309
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This is a required course for Honours students in their final year. Enrolment is restricted to Honours students. The course is organized around two sets of activities: 1) workshops oriented to the development of knowledge and skills directly applicable to the process of thesis research, covering such topics as ethical decision-making in social research, practical problems in collecting and analyzing research material, writing in social research and 2) student presentations of thesis proposals, progress reports, and final results. Entry of non-Sociology students is with permission of instructor.

2950SOCI.4033.A
Advanced Sociological Theory
Kelly, ColmM W02:30PM-03:50PMJDH.G6
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A critical examination of selected orientations from contemporary sociological theory. The implications of these perspectives for both the nature of sociological inquiry and the prevailing models of society are considered. Prerequisites: SOCI 2033 and 3023.

2825SPAN.1006.A1
Beginning Spanish
Basabe, OmarM W F12:30PM-01:20PMECH.G14
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The beginner's course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of the language. It represents the basic level in the learning of Spanish. Teaching methods and texts will vary from year to year and from instructor to instructor. The aims of the course are the acquisition of (1) listening comprehension, (2) basic vocabulary suitable for everyday conversations, (3) simple grammatical structures, and (4) a knowledge of reading and writing techniques. The basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) are emphasized. In addition, each instructor will introduce the students to selected elements of Hispanic Culture.

2832SPAN.1006.B1
Beginning Spanish
Basabe, OmarM W F01:30PM-02:20PMECH.G14
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The beginner's course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of the language. It represents the basic level in the learning of Spanish. Teaching methods and texts will vary from year to year and from instructor to instructor. The aims of the course are the acquisition of (1) listening comprehension, (2) basic vocabulary suitable for everyday conversations, (3) simple grammatical structures, and (4) a knowledge of reading and writing techniques. The basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) are emphasized. In addition, each instructor will introduce the students to selected elements of Hispanic Culture.

2836SPAN.1006.C1
Beginning Spanish
Sainz, HaydeeM W F10:30AM-11:20AMECH.223
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The beginner's course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of the language. It represents the basic level in the learning of Spanish. Teaching methods and texts will vary from year to year and from instructor to instructor. The aims of the course are the acquisition of (1) listening comprehension, (2) basic vocabulary suitable for everyday conversations, (3) simple grammatical structures, and (4) a knowledge of reading and writing techniques. The basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) are emphasized. In addition, each instructor will introduce the students to selected elements of Hispanic Culture.

2838SPAN.1006.D1
Beginning Spanish
Sainz, HaydeeM W F11:30AM-12:20PMECH.223
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The beginner's course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of the language. It represents the basic level in the learning of Spanish. Teaching methods and texts will vary from year to year and from instructor to instructor. The aims of the course are the acquisition of (1) listening comprehension, (2) basic vocabulary suitable for everyday conversations, (3) simple grammatical structures, and (4) a knowledge of reading and writing techniques. The basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) are emphasized. In addition, each instructor will introduce the students to selected elements of Hispanic Culture.

2913SPAN.2013.A
Intermediate Spanish I
Basabe, OmarM W F11:30AM-12:20PMECH.G14
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This course begins with a review of the first-year course and proceeds to include, in a progressive way, the new components of intermediate grammar. Conversation will be an essential part of the course. Vocabulary expansion will be developed through short readings. The practice of listening, speaking, writing, and reading will give students the opportunity to improve their use of the language. Audio-visual materials will reinforce the student's understanding of Hispanic Culture.

2912SPAN.2413.A
Oral Intense I
Sainz, HaydeeT TH11:30AM-02:20PMECH.223
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This innovative course will provide intense oral practice in Spanish. In addition to traditional oral practices (film, radio, video, discussions, oral presentations, debates), there will be small discussion groups and regular access to sound and video files on the WWW. News items, current newspapers, radio and television news will be accessed regularly on the WWW and specific news items will be followed in some detail. Prerequisite: At least 12 credit hours in Spanish or the equivalent. 6 hours class per week.

2910SPAN.3513.A
Advanced Grammar I
Basabe, OmarW F09:00AM-10:20AMECH.G14
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This course aims to build on the knowledge and communicative skills that students have previously acquired, in a limited form, with regards to the subjunctive tense. During the course of the semester, in-class activities will emphasize the practice of the present subjunctive tense. Some structural exercises and reading activities will be used; however, the course is based on communicative activities and projects that will reinforce grammar acquisition.

2909SPAN.4723.A
Latin Amer. Women's Literature
Sainz, HaydeeM04:00PM-06:50PMECH.320
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This course offers an overview of the contribution made by women writers to the corpus of Spanish American literature. Through the reading and analysis of some of the most representative literary texts of the narrative, poetic and dramatic genres, and taking into consideration the contexts of their times, we will examine the topics of feminism, history, politics, sexuality, national identity and society as expressed by these women authors.

2907SPAN.4843.A
20th C Span-Amer Cult. & Text
Basabe, OmarM W F10:30AM-11:20AMECH.320
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The many stories of 20th century Spanish America will be told through the study of 20thcentury drama, beginning with the period of Social Realism and followed by in-depth study of some of the most representative works that characterize the political drama movement in Spanish America.

2611STS.1003.A
Science, Tech. and Society I
Wisniewski, AngelaM W F10:30AM-11:20AMJDH.G5
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Science and technology are among the most powerful forces in our world today and come with a vast and complicated array of social, ethical, political, legal, and economic implications. This course introduces students to the core theories and various branches of the dynamic field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) in order to facilitate thoughtful analysis of the intertwined relations among science, technology, and society.

2613STS.1503.A
Principles of Biology I
Langmaid, WilfredT TH04:00PM-05:20PMBMH.102
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[I. Science Courses]This course introduces students to the study of life. Topics include the scientific method, biological molecules, cell structure and function, energy flow, respiration, and photosynthesis.

2615STS.2103.A
Science, Tech. and Society II
Jenkins, JaneW F09:00AM-10:20AMMMH.307
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This course provides an intermediate-level study of the core theories and various branches of the dynamic field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) in order to facilitate thoughtful analysis and discussion of relevant topics which may include: science and public policy, STS and the environment, science and the media, the public understanding of science, gender and science, and/or expertise and scientific knowledge production. Prerequisite: STS 1003.

2620STS.2243.A
Science & Tech. in World Hist.
Jenkins, JaneT TH08:30AM-09:50AMMMH.307
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Examines the transformation of civilizations around the world by technologies such as stone tools, catapults, hydraulic engineering, metallurgy, and gunpowder. Also examines the growth of the abstract, theoretical sciences of astronomy, mathematics, and medicine in various regions including China, the Americas, Egypt and Greece. Aims to understand the social, political, economic, and religious consequences of science and technology from the Paleolithic Era to the mid-16th century.

3193STS.2413.A
Science, Tech. & Innovation
Wisniewski, AngelaM W F11:30AM-12:20PMJDH.205
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This course examines the field of science and technology studies (STS) with a focus on science and technological-based innovation, historically and in the contemporary world. The course will offer students an opportunity to critcally evaluate theories of technological change, and science and technology in globalization, and the post-modern economy. Students will also be expected to critically discuss implications for public policies in the areas of research and development, science and technology, and innovation. No pre-requisites required.

3192STS.3303.A
Sex, Science & Gender
Wisniewski, AngelaT TH01:00PM-02:20PMMMH.308
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This course examines how scientific research, in the late 19th and 20th centuries, has shaped common conceptions of sex behavior and how this scientific knowledge has also been shaped by cultural conceptions of gender roles and normal behavior.

2698STS.3413.A
God, Nature, & Charles Darwin
Jenkins, JaneT TH04:00PM-05:20PMMMH.106
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Examines the complex interactions between theories of biological evolution and Christianity. Beginning with ancient Greek theories of how species arise, the course will focus primarily on the social, political, economic, techno-scientific, and religion contexts of the 19th century when ideas of species transmutation or evolution were discussed. Pre-requisite: a minimum of 9 credit hours beyond the 1000-level.

2630STS.3433.A
Writing Workshop
Jenkins, JaneW02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.309
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This course enhances skills in writing and oral presentations within the context of major themes in the discipline of STS. It is recommended for students planning to undertake honours studies in STS and 4000-level seminars as well as for students wishing to pursue graduate studies or careers requiring accomplished written and oral presentation skills. Pre-requisite: permission of the instructor.

Last Published: Sun Dec 17 06:05:02 2017