Semester 2 Course Offerings

Generated: Sat Jul 21 06:00:43 2018

SYNCourseInstrDaysTimeLoc
3608ANTH.1013.E
Intro to Cultural Anthropology
Toner, PeterT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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This is an introduction to the study of contemporary cultures and languages and to the methods of ethnographic fieldwork.

3609ANTH.1013.F
Intro to Cultural Anthropology
Proulx, CraigT TH08:30AM-09:50AMTBA.TBA
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This is an introduction to the study of contemporary cultures and languages and to the methods of ethnographic fieldwork.

3610ANTH.1013.G
Intro to Cultural Anthropology
Votour, BradleyM W F12:30PM-01:20PMTBA.TBA
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This is an introduction to the study of contemporary cultures and languages and to the methods of ethnographic fieldwork.

3611ANTH.1023.B
Intro to Physical Anthr.
McLaughlin, MoiraT TH08:30AM-09:50AMTBA.TBA
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An introduction to the study of humans as a biocultural species. The focus of this course is on human evolution, human variation and genetics, nonhuman primates, and the work of physical anthropologists.

3612ANTH.2333.A
World Archaeology
Mora, SantiagoM W F10:30AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course will introduce students to past cultural expressions in different parts of the world. Following a general introduction to archaeological methods and techniques and the nature of archaeological record, this course will proceed to discuss multiple archaeological cases related to the ways of life of hunter-gatherers and complex societies - chiefdoms and states - as well as the rise and fall of these forms of social and political organization. Past cultural practices and the processes that give rise to cultural change will be examined in different locations around the globe. Prerequisite: None.

3613ANTH.2423.A
Human Evolution
McLaughlin, MoiraT TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course is a study of the current knowledge and scientific debate regarding the origins and development of the human species. Fossil evidence and evolutionary theory from a historical and modern perspective are emphasized. Not open to first-year students.

3614ANTH.2513.A
Cultural Anthropology
Votour, BradleyM W F11:30AM-12:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course examines culture both conceptually and in its diverse forms ranging from foraging to peasant and industrial societies. Both non-Western and Western value systems and their social expression in political, economic, and ideological institutions will be studied from cross-cultural and historical perspectives. The study of non-Western societies will also be used in a critical examination of contemporary Western industrial societies. Prerequisite: ANTH 1013.

3615ANTH.3673.A
Music and Globalization
Toner, PeterT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course is an examination of music from different parts of the world with the intent of understanding the significance of music in diverse cultural contexts. The course will take as fundamental the idea that music does not merely express underlying cultural realities, but plays an active role in constructing those cultural realities. More importantly, however, this course analyzes the cultural, political, and economic implications of the process where by a wide range of the world's music have been commodified and sold in the global music marketplace through the mediation of the global music industry. Prerequisite: None.

3668ANTH.3693.A
Media Anthropology
Proulx, CraigT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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What role do media play in cultural production and maintenance? Our primary concern will be to analyze the ways people engage with communications media to confer cultural meanings on their surroundings, to forge social relations, and to negotiate power. We will deal with questions of coding and decoding; the manipulation of audiences, audience reception, class relations maintained through media and examine the notion of cultural imperialism among others. We will also address some of the practical and theoretical issues anthropological media research poses looking to media production, circulation and reception in various parts of the world. This course reviews the burgeoning literature in media and newmedia anthropology and draws on specific cases throughout the world and across media to highlight methodological and conceptual challenges. The general aim is to promote interest and independent inquiry into this relatively new field of anthropological study. Prerequisite: ANTH 1013.

3567ANTH.3806.A2
Readings in Anth. Theory
Mora, SantiagoM W F12:30PM-01:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course is an intensive reading and seminar discussion on selected recent anthropological theories. Students will read and analyze original works from the second half of the 20th century to the present in an attempt to evaluate their explanatory value and their consequences in the development of anthropology as an academic discipline. Prerequisite: ANTH 1013 and one area ethnography course. Anthropology majors must take this course in their third year of study.

3669ANTH.4003.A
Issues in Anthropology
Toner, PeterW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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This is an advanced course in anthropological theory which focuses on an issue or set of issues that are of particular concern in anthropology today. The course will be oriented around intensive reading and discussion of theoretical materials drawn from anthropology and allied disciplines. Possible issues include the dialectic between structure and agency, the commensurability and translation of cultures, power and knowledge, and the writing of ethnographic texts,among others. Honours students may be required to fulfill separate course requirements from majors. Prerequisite: Prerequisites: ANTH 3806 and ANTH 3913. Anthropology majors must take this course in their final year of study. Register with permission by instructor.

3670ANTH.4443.A
Applied Forensic Anthropology
McLaughlin, MoiraT TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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The focus of this course is the analysis of specific cases in forensic anthropology, demonstrating how the various components of the law enforcement agencies become involved, and at what stage. The class will analyze the skeletal material associated with each case and do background research as a means of solving the case. The format of the course will be mainly in-class lab work accompanied by extensive research and off-campus visits. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: ANTH 3443 and permission of the instructor.

3592AQGB.EN1006.A2
Introduction to Literature
Wilkie, RodgerT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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An introduction to the range and variety of literature in English, to the practice of critical reading, and to writing about ideas and texts in conventional academic language and forms. The course concentrates on the central genres of literature.

3594AQGB.PH1006.A2
Intro to Western Philosophy
Hall, AlanT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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An introduction, through lecture, reading of original sources, and discussion, to the origins and development of western philosophy. The first part of the course studies this tradition from its beginnings in ancient Greece through the Christian Middle Ages. Authors read include Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, and St. Thomas Aquinas. Themes include the nature of reality, the nature of human being and human knowledge; moral and political philosophy; the existence and nature of God. The latter part of the course continues the survey of developments in western philosophy, from the early modern period to contemporary discussion. The focus is on rationalism, empiricism, idealism, and the reactions these provoked.

3598AQGH.EN1006.A2
Intro to Literature
Wilkie, RodgerT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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Intro to Literature

3600AQGH.HR1006.A2
Intro to Human Rights
Dinan, MatthewT TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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Intro to Human Rights

3602AQGH.PO1006.A2
Intro to Political Science
Kinney, RossT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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Intro to Political Science

4156BIOL.1513.A
Principles of Biology II
Langmaid, WilfredT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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[IV. Scientific and Mathematical]This course examines mitosis, meiosis, and genetics. Surveys the structure, function, and evolution of the kingdoms of life. Discusses the basics of ecology, culminating in ecological interactions and the impact of humans on the planet.

3620BUSI.2013.B
Introduction to Business
Critchley, KenM W04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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The course introduces a range of business topics with an emphasis on business practices in the Canadian context. Topics include entrepreneurship, financial process, marketing, socially responsible business, management, human resources, and the role of business in the Canadian economy. In addition, broader issues, such as business ethics and relations between employees and employers will be discussed.

3621BUSI.3013.A
Personal Financial Planning
Sheppard, LarryT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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The course introduces techniques of personal financial planning, which will be of value for both personal and professional use. Topics include planning strategies, managing credit and debt, time value of money, personal income tax, risk management and insurance, investment basics, retirement planning, and the development personal financial plans.

3590CATH.2003.A
Intro to Catholic Studies
Dinan, MatthewM W04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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An introduction to the Catholic tradition through a consideration of what it means to be Catholic, and how this experience has been expressed historically and culturally in philosophy, theology, prayer, literature, personal and social morality, and art.

4007COPP.1023.A
Intro. to Policy Studies
Curtis Maillet, DonnaT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]This course introduces students to the policy making process, how policies are researched, drafted, legislated, and communicated. The course will also explore how non-governmental organizations, citizens groups and corporations influence public policy.

4008COPP.1023.B
Intro. to Policy Studies
Harvey, JaniceW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]This course introduces students to the policy making process, how policies are researched, drafted, legislated, and communicated. The course will also explore how non-governmental organizations, citizens groups and corporations influence public policy.

4010COPP.2013.B
Fundamentals of Writing
Tunney, MarkT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]Communicating public policy requires clear and effective writing at every stage in the process. This is a foundational writing course that will help students learn to express themselves in clear, compelling language. Prerequisites: COPP 1013, COPP 1023.

4028COPP.2033.A
Research Methods
MacLean, Heather-AnneM06:30PM-09:20PMTBA.TBA
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]This course will introduce students to the methods for gathering and analyzing data through interviews, surveys, focus groups, content analysis, and polls and how this information can be applied to public policy initiatives and planning an accompanying communications strategy. Prerequisite: COPP 2013.

4029COPP.3013.A
Rhetoric
Camp, MichaelT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]This course builds on the skills developed in the Fundamentals of Writing course and applies them to rhetoric, speech writing and debating. Students will read ancient and modern speeches, historical writings on rhetoric and explore the influence of persuasive writing on public affairs. Prerequisites: COPP 2013, COPP 2023, COPP 2033.

3944COPP.4006.A2
Case Studies in Public Policy
Gillies, JamesW02:30PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]The capstone case study course will require students to spend the fall semester surveying scholarly literature on public policy analysis (regarding policy development, design and implementation) and the winter semester applying this research as they write two case studies that will require students to synthesize the issues encountered in their Focus Areas with their studies in Communications. Course work can be presented in English and French. Prerequisites: COPP 3013, COPP 3023, COPP 3033.

3958COPP.4016.A2
Internship
Dickson, DonaldTH06:30PM-09:20PMTBA.TBA
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]Students will complete two supervised professional unpaid internships in a professional communications agency, non-profit organization, or government office and will complete a detailed exit report. Where possible, students will have the opportunity to pursue internships that require them to work in French or in a bilingual office. Prerequisites: COPP 3013, COPP 3023, COPP 3033.

3873CRIM.1013.E
Introduction to Criminology
Pidwysocky, StephenT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the discipline of criminology: its origins, the nature of disciplinary debates, and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves an examination of crime patterns, causes of criminal behaviour and crime prevention strategies. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upper-level courses.

3874CRIM.1013.F
Introduction to Criminology
Pidwysocky, StephenM W F11:30AM-12:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the discipline of criminology: its origins, the nature of disciplinary debates, and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves an examination of crime patterns, causes of criminal behaviour and crime prevention strategies. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upper-level courses.

3875CRIM.1013.G
Introduction to Criminology
Clifford, JamesW04:00PM-06:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the discipline of criminology: its origins, the nature of disciplinary debates, and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves an examination of crime patterns, causes of criminal behaviour and crime prevention strategies. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upper-level courses.

3894CRIM.1023.H
Intro. to Criminal Justice
Sanford, StephanieTH06:30PM-09:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the role criminology plays in both formulating and critiquing criminal justice policy and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves a critical look at the nature of the criminal justice system, the role of the state and the creation of policies through the passing of bills, legislation, and statutes pertinent to the interpretation of the Criminal Code. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upperlevel courses.

3895CRIM.1023.I
Intro. to Criminal Justice
Sauvageau, JeanT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the role criminology plays in both formulating and critiquing criminal justice policy and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves a critical look at the nature of the criminal justice system, the role of the state and the creation of policies through the passing of bills, legislation, and statutes pertinent to the interpretation of the Criminal Code. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upperlevel courses.

3897CRIM.1023.J
Intro. to Criminal Justice
Sauvageau, JeanT TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the role criminology plays in both formulating and critiquing criminal justice policy and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves a critical look at the nature of the criminal justice system, the role of the state and the creation of policies through the passing of bills, legislation, and statutes pertinent to the interpretation of the Criminal Code. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upperlevel courses.

3899CRIM.2013.A
Early Criminological Theory
Pidwysocky, StephenM W F01:30PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will be a survey course of classical theories in criminology. Classical theories will include the influences of work by early criminologists such as Bentham, Beccaria, Lombroso, Quetelet, and Durkheim in the development of theory and the history of theories of punishment. This course will build on the historical roots of crime and criminological theory in pre-20th century criminological theory. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

3907CRIM.2123.B
Criminal Law
Savarese, JosephineW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course provides an introduction to criminal law - what it is, how it came into being, and the various elements of offences and forms of defence within Canada's criminal law system. Possible topics include: sources of criminal law in Canada; duty to act; voluntariness; negligent homicide; causation; strict and absolute liability; attempts; and a variety of criminal defences, including mental disorder, mistake of fact, consent, provocation, and necessity. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

3909CRIM.2223.B
Youth Justice
Reid, SusanT TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course will examine theories of juvenile delinquency in historical and contemporary perspectives. A review of Canadian legislation concerning young offenders will be done to illuminate the official response to juvenile delinquency in light of the theories noted above. Special attention will be given to the Young Offenders Act, juvenile justice in Canada, the disposition of young offenders, and the rights of young adults. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

3911CRIM.2233.B
Police & the Cdn. Community
Fleming, MichaelM W F11:30AM-12:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course is designed to examine the social and political role of the police and police practices in the contemporary Canadian society. The topics that will be discussed include the functions and objectives of modern policing, police discretion, police powers, and structures of accountability. Particular attention will be given to an examination of the context of police - community relations and crime prevention initiatives. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

3913CRIM.2263.A
Children and Youth At Risk
Sanford, StephanieM06:30PM-09:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will provide an analysis of the concept of at-risk children and youth from a theoretical and practical application. Considering the question of risk from an ecological framework as well as a constructionist perspective, individual and social factors which have an impact on children's and youth ability to cope with threats to their development will be critically evaluated. The literature on resilience in the context of both individual and social justice paradigms will also provide students an opportunity to consider various interventions designed to promote healthy development. Topics may include: youth homelessness, children of incarcerated parents, the impact of poverty on children and families, school drop outs, substance abuse, sport and leisure as crime prevention, bullying. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

3915CRIM.2463.A
Cultural Criminology
McCormick, ChristopherM W F10:30AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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Cultural criminology places deviance and control in the context of culture. Through ethnography and cultural analysis, deviance and control are viewed as cultural products -- creative constructs to be read in terms of the meanings and emotions they embody. Students are challenged to question normative boundaries, and how cultural space is appropriated by power and challenged by transgression. Topics include modern anxiety, visual signifiers and emotion, found in such forms as graffiti, drug subcultures, base-jumping, street-racing or dumpster diving. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

3917CRIM.2743.B
Social Protest in Canada
Boudreau, MichaelT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will explore, from an historical and contemporary perspective, social protest in Canada. Some of the topics that will be studied in this course include: Strikes and Riots; The Women's Liberation Movement; The Gay Liberation Movement; The Environmental Movement; the Counter-Culture Movement of the 1960s and 1970s and Student Protests; The Civil Rights Movement; Anti-War Demonstrations; and First Nations Protests. It will explain the reasons for and the nature of social protest and discuss how social protest groups have shaped the law, politics and popular culture in Canada. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and CRIM 1023.

3919CRIM.2943.B
Victimology
Thomas, BrendaT TH08:30AM-09:50AMTBA.TBA
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This course will examine this specialized field of criminology which is related to the study of victims of crime and factors connected to the victim. A historical perspective on the study of victimology, theories related to the explanation of victimization, the modern evolution of victim rights, and the development of victim services will be examined. Specific victim groups, provincial and federal legislation related to victims, the United Nations Charter of Victims Rights will be addressed, as well as the delivery of services to victims involved in the criminal justice system. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

3922CRIM.3103.A
Advanced Qual.Research Methods
Clarke, DawneT TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course seeks to deepen students' understanding of qualitative research methods, such as research ethics in qualitative research, qualitative research design, interviewing, focus group interviews, participant observation and qualitative content analysis. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

3923CRIM.3123.A
Contemp Issues in Crim Justice
Savarese, JosephineW06:30PM-09:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course is designed to provide an overview and analysis of contemporary controversies and issues pertinent to the criminal justice system and Canadian crime policy. Specific emphasis will be given to an examination of the influence that changes in social policy and shifting public sentiments about crime control have on both the structure and operation of various components of the criminal justice system. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

3926CRIM.3153.A
Criminal Behaviour
Goggin, ClaireT TH08:30AM-09:50AMTBA.TBA
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This course examines the antecedents of, and responses to, criminal behaviour in the context of evidence-based practices in the assessment and treatment of at-risk and diverse offender populations within community and institutional contexts. Topics may include: offender risk assessment practices, major correlates of crime, effective correctional programming, best practices in the prediction and treatment of anti-social behaviour, and an understanding of the role of sound empirical strategies in contributing to what works in addressing criminal behaviour. Prerequisite: CRIM 2243: Corrections.

3928CRIM.3253.A
Pre-Honours Workshop
Goggin, ClaireT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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The goal of this course is the completion of an Honours thesis proposal to be included as part of the Honours application. Topics to be covered include: writing a research question, research methodology and measurement, selecting and using an adequate theory, and writing and submitting a proposal. Completion of this course does not ensure admission into the Honours program. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and CRIM 1023, CRIM 2103, CRIM 2113, CRIM 2013, CRIM 3103.

3930CRIM.3403.A
Discourse and Crime
McCormick, ChristopherM W F11:30AM-12:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course introduces students to the power and impact of discourse in criminology. The discourses of crime will be critically analyzed through such topics as interviews, interrogations, testimony, written accounts, judicial interpretations, and media accounts. Prerequisite: A minimum of 75 credit hours, which includes CRIM 1013 and 1023 or CRIM 1006, or permission of the instructor.

3931CRIM.3643.A
Terrorism: An Introduction
Clifford, JamesT06:30PM-09:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course provides a survey of issues related to terrorism and global conflict wherein students will be able to discuss social, political, economic and cultural roots of terrorism. In particular, this course will develop an appreciation of the complex motivations producing terrorism, as well as the unusual character and significant trade-offs that are induced by governments to minimize the impact of terrorism. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

3932CRIM.3843.A
Corporate Crime and Regulation
Fleming, MichaelT TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course will provide an overview and critical analysis of corporate crime and its regulation in Canada. The course will examine: the problems of definition of corporate crime; the images, measurement and victims of such crime; the types of corporate crime; theories and perspectives on the etiology of corporate criminality and corporate crime; the origins of the laws against corporate crime and contemporary legislative lawmaking in this field; the effectiveness of policing and regulation of corporate crime; and various reforms proposed to deal with such crimes in the future. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023

3934CRIM.4143.A
Hate Crime
Boudreau, MichaelW02:30PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will encourage students to critically evaluate social and legal positions and theories about hate crime, including research on victimization and offences. Possible topics include how hate crime is conceptualized, the organization and impact of hate movements, victim resistance, and social activism. Prerequisite: A minimum of 75 credit hours, which includes CRIM 1013 and 1023, or permission of the instructor.

4306CRIM.4906.A2
Honours Thesis
Staff, -TBA.TBA
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This course is the written component of the Honours thesis project. The Honours thesis may be of an empirical, conceptual, or applied nature. The Honours students accepted into the programme will have been working closely with a faculty member who has agreed to be a supervisor, and develop an Honours thesis. This course is recommended only for those pursuing graduate school. Prerequisite: formal acceptance into the Honours Programme.

3643ECON.1013.C
Intro to Economics (Micro)
Secord, AndrewT TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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[1. Economics Courses]This course, which is equivalent to one half of ECON 1006, examines the behaviour of consumers and producers in a market economy. Among the issues discussed will be environmental protection, wealth and poverty, and the extent of corporate power.(Credit will not be given for both ECON 1006 and ECON 1013.)

3644ECON.1023.B
Intro to Economics (Macro)
Gupta, SatyadevT TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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[1. Economics Courses]This course, which is equivalent to one half of ECON 1006, analyzes the Canadian economy and how it works. It includes a discussion of output, unemployment, growth, money, international trade, and finance. (Credit will not be given for both ECON 1006 and ECON 1023.)

3645ECON.1023.C
Intro to Economics (Macro)
Solati, FaribaM W F11:30AM-12:20PMTBA.TBA
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[1. Economics Courses]This course, which is equivalent to one half of ECON 1006, analyzes the Canadian economy and how it works. It includes a discussion of output, unemployment, growth, money, international trade, and finance. (Credit will not be given for both ECON 1006 and ECON 1023.)

3646ECON.2103.A
Microeconomic Theory I
Gupta, SatyadevM W02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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[1. Economics Courses]A theory course which develops the basic techniques of microeconomic analysis. Topics will include theories of consumer demand, production costs, the behaviour of producers under different market conditions, and the functioning of commodity markets.

3647ECON.3143.A
Macroeconomic Theory II
Solati, FaribaT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[1. Economics Courses]A continuation of the study of macroeconomic theory. This course examines the causes of economic instability and considers appropriate economic policies to deal with inflation and unemployment. Prerequisite: Econ 2113. It is strongly recommended that Math 1013 & 1023 be taken prior to this course or concurrently.

3648ECON.3153.A
Political Economy II
Solati, FaribaM W F01:30PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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[1. Economics Courses] The course will examine the political economy of the state in capitalist society, focusing on the theory and practice of individual, organizational, and class power. Prerequisite: Economics 2153 or permission of the instructor.

3649ECON.3163.A
Quantitative Methods II
Staff, T TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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[1. Economics Courses]A continuation of Quantitative Methods I. The topics covered include: simple regression analysis, multiple regression analysis, residual analysis, time-series analysis, decision making under uncertainty. Prerequisite: 2123. This course may not be taken for credit by students who already have received credit for a comparable statistics course in another discipline at STU or from another university.

3650ECON.3333.A
Persp. on Underdevelopment
McFarland, JoanW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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[1. Economics Courses]An examination of the economic problems facing underdeveloped countries using a Political Economy approach. Theories of dependence, colonization, unequal exchange, and their Marxist critiques will be examined as well as the limitations of traditional economic development theory.

4385EDUC.5015.A2
Field Placement
Levesque, Leo-James-TBA.TBA
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[5. Field Experience] The field placement consists of a minimum of fifteen weeks. There are four days of school visitation and two separate placements in a K-12 school setting. Placement is made by the School of Education in accordance with the policy in the St. Thomas University Calendar and the BEd Field Placement Handbook. All field placements will be conducted in the Province of New Brunswick.

4328EDUC.5143.A
The Professional Learning Comm
Williams, RaymondM W10:30AM-12:20PMBMH.107
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[4. Electives] This course examines schools as learning organizations. It focuses on the philosophical and operational changes essential for the transformation of schools from the traditional bureaucratic paradigm to a learning community approach. Students will analyze case studies to determine how PLC implementation and sustainability are successfully achieved. The final assignment prepares students in the development and delivery of a workshop on professional learning communities for their peers.

4348EDUC.5153.A
Fren. Sec. Lang. Methods: Elem
Levesque, Leo-JamesM W06:30PM-08:20PMBMH.107
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[2. Middle and Secondary Majors and Electives|French Second Language] This course presents theories of second language acquisition, current trends in the field of second-language teaching and learning, and their application to the teaching of French in a communicative and interactive approach at the kindergarten to grade eight levels. Students will develop lesson units, engage in peer-teaching, and integrate technology into their teaching. Students will participate in discussion, work with case studies, research issues in second language education using current professional journals and resources. Attention will be given to developing an understanding of the importance of teaching developmentally. Students will learn about the role of age and social/psychological factors in language acquisition, the benefits of early language learning and the characteristics of the elementary school learner. This course aims at providing solid advice, information and guidance to French Second Language teachers so that they may use a wide variety of approaches and techniques designed to involve students actively in language learning and use. Students are required to have a minimum proficiency of Intermediate Plus on the New Brunswick French Oral Proficiency scale to register for this course.

4336EDUC.5413.A2
Elem.School Reading&Lang. Arts
Ingersoll, MarceaM08:30AM-10:20AMBMH.107
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[3. Elementary Majors] The course will focus on current approaches to reading and language arts instruction. This includes becoming aware of the influence of theories of reading and literacy. You will begin to lay the groundwork for your own effective language arts practice by designing and developing curriculum resources and materials for use in the classroom. You will be expected to review and utilize the New Brunswick Curriculum English Language Arts documents (found online) and your course notes and required texts in your planning and preparation of lessons and activities for this course. The spotlight is on reading and the processes of writing, listening, thinking and comprehension in the elementary classroom.

4338EDUC.5413.B2
Elem.School Reading&Lang. Arts
Ingersoll, MarceaW08:30AM-10:20AMBMH.107
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[3. Elementary Majors] The course will focus on current approaches to reading and language arts instruction. This includes becoming aware of the influence of theories of reading and literacy. You will begin to lay the groundwork for your own effective language arts practice by designing and developing curriculum resources and materials for use in the classroom. You will be expected to review and utilize the New Brunswick Curriculum English Language Arts documents (found online) and your course notes and required texts in your planning and preparation of lessons and activities for this course. The spotlight is on reading and the processes of writing, listening, thinking and comprehension in the elementary classroom.

4332EDUC.5433.A2
Elem School Math Mtds
Wood, ShaundaM01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.205
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[3. Elementary Majors] Elementary mathematics is an introduction to the context and strategies of elementary mathematics (K-8). This course does not require a strong mathematics background. The emphasis will be on content as well as on doing mathematics. Students will be encouraged to be involved in problem solving and exploring mathematical concepts by developing ideas from the concrete to the abstract level, and by developing multiple representations of mathematical ideas. Content topics include pre-number concepts, numeration and place value, whole number operations, number theory, and geometry.

4334EDUC.5433.B2
Elem School Math Mtds
Wood, ShaundaW01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.205
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[3. Elementary Majors] Elementary mathematics is an introduction to the context and strategies of elementary mathematics (K-8). This course does not require a strong mathematics background. The emphasis will be on content as well as on doing mathematics. Students will be encouraged to be involved in problem solving and exploring mathematical concepts by developing ideas from the concrete to the abstract level, and by developing multiple representations of mathematical ideas. Content topics include pre-number concepts, numeration and place value, whole number operations, number theory, and geometry.

4325EDUC.5473.A2
Science for Elem Children
Wood, ShaundaT01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.205
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[3. Elementary Majors] The nature and purpose of science education are explored. Effective use of minimal time allotted to this discipline at the elementary level is the main focus. One of the primary tasks to be undertaken is the construction of discovery-based learning centres as well as appropriate assessment tools. Students will be given the opportunity to experience the dynamics of constructivist science learning with a special emphasis to cross-curricular extensions including health. Time will be spent exploring student record keeping strategies which compliment a guided inquiry-based approach.

4327EDUC.5473.B2
Science for Elem Children
Wood, ShaundaTH01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.205
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[3. Elementary Majors] The nature and purpose of science education are explored. Effective use of minimal time allotted to this discipline at the elementary level is the main focus. One of the primary tasks to be undertaken is the construction of discovery-based learning centres as well as appropriate assessment tools. Students will be given the opportunity to experience the dynamics of constructivist science learning with a special emphasis to cross-curricular extensions including health. Time will be spent exploring student record keeping strategies which compliment a guided inquiry-based approach.

4313EDUC.5613.A2
Methods in Elem Soc. Stud. Ed.
Murray, SharonTH01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.107
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[3. Elementary Majors] This course focuses on investigating elementary school (K-5) social studies teaching methods. The course intends to help pre-service teachers articulate a conception of social studies education and its goals. The main areas of social studies focus are geography, history, political science, and economics and the social aspects of health education. The course design assumes that all teachers strive to engage students in meaningful experiences that bridge the study of social studies concepts with the community of learners in the classroom.

4315EDUC.5613.B2
Methods in Elem Soc. Stud. Ed.
Murray, SharonT01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.107
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[3. Elementary Majors] This course focuses on investigating elementary school (K-5) social studies teaching methods. The course intends to help pre-service teachers articulate a conception of social studies education and its goals. The main areas of social studies focus are geography, history, political science, and economics and the social aspects of health education. The course design assumes that all teachers strive to engage students in meaningful experiences that bridge the study of social studies concepts with the community of learners in the classroom.

4341EDUC.5633.A
Methods in Teaching History
Murray, SharonT TH10:30AM-12:20PMBMH.107
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[2. Middle and Secondary Majors and Electives|Social Studies] Methods and strategies of teaching history at the secondary level are the focus of the course. A strong emphasis is on awareness of the place of history teaching in the curriculum. Course participants explore and develop a variety of active learning activities. A history background or broad historical knowledge is an asset.

4342EDUC.5813.A
Secondary English Mtds
Ingersoll, MarceaM W01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.107
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[2. Middle and Secondary Majors and Electives|Language Arts] The Secondary English methods course exposes pre-service teachers to the elements that support current methods of teaching literature to middle and high school students (2011). The course text provides a framework for examining methods based on a social constructivist premise. The course will also expose pre-service teachers to recent adolescent literature. Learning outcomes in the course include: designing and participating in book club discussions, developing units of literature instruction, writing about assessment and evaluation for the secondary English classroom, understanding curriculum outcomes for secondary English lessons and other topics that we encounter during the course. Students in the course will be asked to consider what they value in literature instruction, what they believe about individual differences, how the reading abilities of their students affects their teaching, planning and assessment. Subsequently students in the course will consider and design planning models for effective instruction.

4343EDUC.5833.A
Teaching Sec. Math & Science
Williams, GrantM W03:30PM-05:20PMBMH.205
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[2. Middle and Secondary Majors and Electives|Math and Science] Course participants will develop the content mastery and pedagogical skills necessary to facilitate engaging, inquiry-based math and science lessons for high school students. By examining various math and science education resources, developing and practicing lesson presentations, and reflecting on learning through discussion and writing, the course participants will gain a greater level of mathematics and science content knowledge and a wider array of teaching strategies for the topics in high school math and science. This course is primarily intended for Math and/or Science majors.

4347EDUC.5853.A
Drama Across the Curriculum
Hewson, AnneT TH03:30PM-05:20PMBMH.202
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[4. Electives] This course will explore how drama can be used as a pedagogical tool in the classroom, particularly at the secondary level. In addition to learning basic drama skills, students will become acquainted with theatrical forms and conventions that are used to explore educational content in curricular areas such as language arts, social studies, science, etc. Participants will have the opportunity to create and fine-tune their own educational drama lessons. Discussions will include classroom management issues that arise when running a drama class.

4340EDUC.5913.E
Measurement and Evaluation
Buggie, WilliamT TH10:30AM-12:20PMBMH.205
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[1. Core Courses|Pedagogical] This course examines the connections between achievement assessment and classroom instruction. Topics will include: major types of assessment methods, validity and reliability in assessment planning, norm and criterion referenced assessment and standardized testing.

4329EDUC.5913.S
Measurement and Evaluation
Buggie, WilliamM W08:30AM-10:20AMBMH.205
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[1. Core Courses|Pedagogical] This course examines the connections between achievement assessment and classroom instruction. Topics will include: major types of assessment methods, validity and reliability in assessment planning, norm and criterion referenced assessment and standardized testing.

4344EDUC.5953.A
Educational Psyc. I
Williams, RaymondM W03:30PM-05:20PMBMH.107
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[1. Core Courses|Pedagogical] This course explores the major theoretical principles upon which education for children and adults may be based. It also examines the notion of 'normative' characteristics of learners as well as current trends in the application of theory to classroom situations.

4345EDUC.5953.B
Educational Psyc. I
Williams, RaymondT TH03:30PM-05:20PMBMH.205
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[1. Core Courses|Pedagogical] This course explores the major theoretical principles upon which education for children and adults may be based. It also examines the notion of 'normative' characteristics of learners as well as current trends in the application of theory to classroom situations.

4349EDUC.5993.E
Except. & Differentiated Ed
Treadwell, ChrisT TH06:30PM-08:20PMBMH.205
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[1. Core Courses|Pedagogical] The course provides an overview of issues associated with specific student groups, including students with various exceptionalities and or academic abilities. This includes but is not exclusive to students with developmental or learning disabilities (as part of or in addition to an individualized program plan), students who are gifted, English Language learners, and students who are at risk for leaving high school before completion. Through a combination of the study of recent research and an examination of theory and differentiated practice within the New Brunswick school context, the course offers pre-service teacher opportunities to use curriculum-specific perspectives while co-constructing instructional and assessment strategies, for teaching all students.

4339EDUC.5993.S
Except. & Differentiated Ed
Staff, T TH08:30AM-10:20AMBMH.205
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[1. Core Courses|Pedagogical] The course provides an overview of issues associated with specific student groups, including students with various exceptionalities and or academic abilities. This includes but is not exclusive to students with developmental or learning disabilities (as part of or in addition to an individualized program plan), students who are gifted, English Language learners, and students who are at risk for leaving high school before completion. Through a combination of the study of recent research and an examination of theory and differentiated practice within the New Brunswick school context, the course offers pre-service teacher opportunities to use curriculum-specific perspectives while co-constructing instructional and assessment strategies, for teaching all students.

3969ENGL.1016.A2
English Literatures
Klein, AndrewM W F10:30AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

3971ENGL.1016.B2
English Literatures
McConnell, KathleenM W F11:30AM-12:20PMTBA.TBA
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

3973ENGL.1016.C2
English Literatures
Morgan, DawnM W02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

3983ENGL.1016.D2
English Literatures
Allen, EllaW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

3987ENGL.1016.E2
English Literatures
Tremblay, AnthonyT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

4026ENGL.2013.C
Research Methods in English
Whittaker, RobinT TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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[2. Intermediate Course ] An introduction to the discipline and practice of English; specifically, the use of research and scholarly sources in academic writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 1006.

4027ENGL.2123.A
Creative Writing: Strategies
Staff, M W02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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[2. Intermediate Course ] A course for students interested in writing poetry, prose, and/or scripts. Along with writing assignments and workshopping (critiquing each others' work), students give presentations or blog on topics that will help them understand current issues relevant to writers. This course is also open to first-year students. Prerequisite: 5-10 page sample of work submitted to the instructor at least a week before registration, or ENGL 2113.

4037ENGL.2233.A
Acting & Theatre Prod. II
Ross, LisaT06:30PM-09:20PMTBA.TBA
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[2. Intermediate Course ] Continued exploration of the fundamental elements that combine to create theatre. Through improvisations, exercises, monologues, and scenes, students learn the techniques of acting and stagecraft to further their awareness of the process of performance. Enrolment is restricted to those who have received permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 2213.

4038ENGL.2393.A
Literature, Technology,Culture
Sawler, TrevorM W F10:30AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[2. Intermediate Course ] This course will examine various kinds of technological change, from the invention of the printing press to the advent of the Web. We will consider how these changes have shaped our fears, expectations, and understandings of self and culture. The course will emphasize print literature while recognizing and evaluating new media. (Post-1800.)

4039ENGL.2523.A
Study of Drama - An Intro
Smith, LeslieM W F11:30AM-12:20PMTBA.TBA
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[2. Intermediate Course ] An exploration from Greek theatre to contemporary works of the theatrical conventions, significant trends, playwrights and performers that inform and construct the social practice of theatre. Emphasis is placed both on close textual study of the works and the realities of staging productions.

4040ENGL.2563.A
Science Fiction II:Themes
Sawler, TrevorM W F01:30PM-02:30PMTBA.TBA
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[2. Intermediate Course ]An exploration of central themes in science fiction from the New Wave of the 1960s to the present. Issues such as gender, the environment, technology, the alien, and others are the focus. (Categories: Genres, Cultural Studies).

4041ENGL.2593.A
Women Writers II
Beauchamp Desroches, LissaW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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[2. Intermediate Course ] An investigation of women's writing in English after 1800, through poetry, (auto)biography, fiction, drama, film, and theory written by women.

4042ENGL.2613.A
History of Children's Lit.
Smith, LeslieT TH08:30AM-09:50AMTBA.TBA
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[2. Intermediate Course ] An investigation of the history of children's literature, this course uses the resources of UNB's Children's Literature Collection to explore the development of literature for children.

4043ENGL.2733.A
Fiction,Drama & Film:II
Donovan, StewartT04:00PM-06:50PMTBA.TBA
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[2. Intermediate Course ]A study of the nature of narrative in fiction, drama, and film, but there is a more specific consideration of the art of adaptation - its thematic, technical, and aesthetic triumphs and pitfalls. (Categories: Genres, Cultural Studies).

4044ENGL.2753.A
Major Canadian Writers
Prescott, JoshuaT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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[2. Intermediate Course ] An examination of selected writers who have made a significant contribution to Canadian literature. (Post-1800; Canadian/American literature).

4045ENGL.2803.A
Contemporary Theory I
Klein, AndrewM W F12:30PM-01:20PMTBA.TBA
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[2. Intermediate Course ] The primary concern of this course is to familiarize students with the social, political, cultural, and philosophical presuppositions of theoretical inquiry into literary texts. We shall begin by focusing on introductory commentaries and shall proceed from there to examine certain primary theoretical texts in their specific relation to literary examples. (Post-1800; Language.)

4046ENGL.3133.A
Spec. Topics : Visual Texts
McConnell, KathleenTH06:30PM-09:20PMTBA.TBA
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[3. Advanced Course] We constantly encounter texts and images together, from advertisements, through graphic novels, to the high-art work of artists like Rene Magritte. However, the part of the brain that processes images is on the opposite side of that which process text, which means that images and text are always in a state of dynamic tension. In this creative writing course, students will create and discuss work exploring that tension. Prerequisite: either ENGL 2113: Creative Writing Skills, or ENGL 2123: Creative Writing Strategies.

3990ENGL.3216.A2
Adv. Acting & Theatre Prod.
Ross, LisaW02:30PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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[3. Advanced Course] A course that focuses on the text as a performance vehicle written not only for readers, but more immediately for actors, directors, and designers. The course includes a public production. In-class presentations are also a major component of the course. Enrolment is restricted to those who have received permission from the instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 2233.

3993ENGL.3316.A2
Shakespeare & Drama of His Age
Cornell, ChristineT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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[3. Advanced Course] A study of plays of Shakespeare, his predecessors, and contemporaries such as Marlowe and Jonson. (Pre-1800.)

4047ENGL.3403.A
Canadian Poetry
Tremblay, AnthonyT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[3. Advanced Course] A tracing of the development of a uniquely Canadian poetic voice from the eighteenth century beginnings of Canadian poetry, through the Confederation and early modernist periods, to its flowering in Montreal in the 1950s and the west coast in the 1960s. (Post-1800; Canadian.)

4048ENGL.3473.A
Irish Film II
Donovan, StewartW04:00PM-06:50PMTBA.TBA
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[3. Advanced Course] In this course students will study native Irish culture and the culture of the diaspora through the medium of film. The course continues to explore the themes outlined in Irish Film I, but there is a more sustained concentration on films produced from the 1980s to the present. (Post-1800.)

4050ENGL.3503.A
The Classical Epic
Wilkie, RodgerW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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[3. Advanced Course] An introduction to the conventions of the epic and to classical mythology. Texts may include Epic of Gilgamesh, Homer's Iliad, and Vergil's Aeneid. All texts are in translation. (Pre-1800.)

4052ENGL.3593.A
Contemporary Theatre
Whittaker, RobinT TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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[3. Advanced Course] Through critical analysis and interpretation of dramatic texts, this course explores plays, playwrights, and major aesthetic movements in the theatre from the mid-twentieth century to the present. Gender, feminism, and queer theory; the avant-garde and experimental performance; violence, nationalism, and monarchy; and race, postcoloniality, and contemporary life are examined in dramatic texts and performances. (Post-1800)

3956ENGL.3953.A
Spec. Topics: Pre-1800 Lit.II
Klein, AndrewM W02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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[3. Advanced Course] The content of this course will reflect the expertise of Department faculty and consist of advanced treatment of a topic, genre, author, or authors in one or more areas of specialization in pre-1800 literature, including Medieval, Renaissance, Seventeenth-century, or Eighteenth-century English literature.

4054ENGL.4153.A
Senior Proj. in Creative Writ.
McConnell, KathleenT06:30PM-09:20PMTBA.TBA
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[3. Advanced Course] The Senior Project gives a student the opportunity to work on an extended project, as author, translator or chief editor. Beginning with a proposal including a description of the project and a survey of similar works, students will create or compile an extended text. It is recommended that students take ENGL 4153 in their final year of study. The prerequisites are one of the following courses: ENGL 3103, 3113, 3123, or 3133 and permission of the instructor.

3957ENGL.4223.A
Spec.Topics: Microperformance
Whittaker, RobinW06:30PM-09:20PMTBA.TBA
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[3. Advanced Course] Performance is a way of knowing. In this capstone course in the Drama Concentration, students engage in Performance-Based Research in order to develop a series of microperformances on contemporary issues in contrasting theatrical forms. These forms may include invisible theatre, forum theatre, naturalism, agitprop, devised theatre, futurism, and Brechtian epic theatre. Enrolment is restricted to students who have received permission from the instructor. Pre-requisite: ENGL 2013 or Research Methods in any discipline.

3961ENGL.4776.A2
Spec.Topics:Novels & Hmrt
Morgan, DawnTH02:30PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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[3. Advanced Course] A study of the co-emergence of the modern novel and the discourse of human rights in later eighteenth century England.

3965ENGL.4796.A2
Sp.Top:Homemade Apocalypse
Desroches, DennisT02:30PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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[3. Advanced Course] This seminar course offers students the conceptual tools necessary for a deep understanding, and trenchant critique, of contemporary cultural practices. Readings across several fields of study will be brought to bear on popular culture's most dominant issues, and most urgent questions. Such questions include, but are not limited to: income inequality, food security, techno-economics, climate change, grassroots social movements, media bias, governmentality, and the very limits of capitalist democracy as it transforms, and deforms, under the pressure of neoliberal ideology.

3626ENVS.1013.C
Envir. & Soc. I: Intro to Env.
Harvey, JaniceT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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Earth systems science reveals that the environmental conditions that supported the development of human civilization over the past 10,000 years are becoming increasingly destabilized. This course introduces students to the Earth's regulatory systems such as climate, nitrogen and phosphorus flows, forests, oceans and biodiversity, and the social structures and processes that are interfering with them. Students will come to understand that environmental problems cannot be solved by individual behavioural changes; solutions will require collective action to achieve systemic change.

3627ENVS.1023.A
Intr. to Environmental Praxis
Harvey, JaniceT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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Praxis can be understood as reflection and action for social change. Drawing on learning in ENVS 1013, students will investigate how global environmental problems are manifested at the local level. They will then develop local action strategies to effect change in those systems. This approach will foster citizenship skills and empower students in the face of global problems. This course will qualify for the STU Experiential Learning Certificate. Prerequisite: ENVS 1013.

3628ENVS.3023.A
Env. Praxis
Glynn, TracyT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course explores how alternative visions of the future translate into political action at the international, national, provincial, community, and personal levels. This involves an analysis of alternative theories of the nature of social change. A component of this course may be service learning. Prerequisites: ENVS 1013 and 1023, or permission of the instructor.

4223ESL.1023.B
Eng for Acad: Read and Writ II
Van Den Broeck, ChrisM W F10:30AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[1.ESL Courses]This course will help students whose first language is not English further develop academic reading and writing skills. The reading techniques to be improved will include skimming, previewing, predicting and in-depth analyzing. The types of writing practiced will be summaries, paraphrases and essays (cause and effect, and persuasive). Vocabulary-building and grammar will also be important components of the course. Students will also develop their ability to conduct library-based research and to synthesize information for writing assignments. Prerequisite: ESL 1013 or Director's permission. Co-requisite: ESL 1043.

4224ESL.1043.B
Eng for Acad: Speak and Lis II
Van Den Broeck, ChrisM W F11:30AM-12:20PMTBA.TBA
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[1.ESL Courses]This course helps students whose first language is not English to develop the speaking and listening skills required in university studies. The basic elements of oral expression and comprehension will be studied: sounds, word and sentence stress, rhythm, intonation, comprehension of weak forms, and connected speech. Listening skills will include intensive, selective and interactive tasks, such as note-taking. Speaking functions will include presenting information, asking questions and debating. 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: ESL 1033 or Director's permission. Co-requisite: ESL 1023.

4225ESL.2213.B
Adv. Eng. for Acad. Purposes I
James, ArthurT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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[1.ESL Courses]This course is designed to assist ESL students in meeting the language-related expectations of university courses. The primary focus will be on academic writing skills. Attention will also be devoted to listening, speaking, reading, grammar, and vocabulary acquisition. Language skills will be linked to academic content from a number of disciplines. The course is intended for students whose first language is not English and whose TOEFL scores are between 550 and 599 (or a recognized equivalent). Prerequisite: ESL 1023 or Director's permission.

4226ESL.2223.B
Adv. Eng. for Acad. Purpose II
James, ArthurT TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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[1.ESL Courses]This course is designed to assist ESL students in further developing their ability to meet the language-related expectations of university courses. The emphasis will be on refining writing skills. Attention will also be devoted to listening, speaking, reading, grammar, and vocabulary acquisition. Students will explore how the various language skills are interconnected in the university context. The course is intended for students whose first language is not English and whose TOEFL scores are between 550 and 599 (or a recognized equivalent). Prerequisite: ESL 2213 or Director's permission.

3891FNAR.1023.B
Music Theory and Performance
Peacock, StevenM W02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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The course examines the basic elements of music (notation, intervals, keys, scales, chords, meter) from a practical, hands-on perspective and introduces music theory and performance. Assignments include recognizing notes and rhythms on the staff, singing, and playing instruments. Please note that previous music experience is welcome but not required for this course.

3832FNAR.1051.A2
STU Singers I
Simonds, RossM05:30PM-06:50PMTBA.TBA
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The St. Thomas Singers is a no-audition choir, open to students and the academic community at large. Rehearsals take place once a week; with at least two concert performances per year towards the end of each term. The course earns one credit per year. A course fee may be required for the purchase of scores and other performance expenses. No previous knowledge of music is necessary.

3892FNAR.1303.B
The Guitar in Western Music
Peacock, StevenW06:30PM-09:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course offers an overview of and a wide-ranging appreciation for the guitar within the broad tradition of Western music, exploring the guitar in its many forms and across many genres of musical expression. The course examines the history of the guitar (including its antecedent forms-the lute, vihuela and bandora, for example), its design evolution, the approaches to technique which the evolving instrument has engendered, its repertoire, and the composers and performers whose contributions to guitar music have been particularly notable. No previous guitar-playing ability is required, but at least a basic practical knowledge will be encouraged.

3893FNAR.1333.A
Drawing and Sketching
Forrestall, WilliamM W F10:30AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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A practical course in the fundamentals of two-dimensional art practice with an emphasis on outdoor drawing and sketching. Students are introduced to a variety of drawing media including the use of pencil, charcoal, and ink. Landscape, figure and non-representational drawing practice are addressed. No prior experience is necessary. Prerequisite: FNAR 1113.

4229FNAR.1633.A
Drawing and Sketching II
Forrestall, WilliamM W F10:30AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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A practical course in the fundamentals of two-dimensional art practice with an emphasis on outdoor drawing and sketching in various media. Pre-requisite: FNAR 1333, Drawing and Sketching I or FNAR 1113, Practical Introduction to Art Fundamentals.

3837FNAR.2051.A2
STU Singers II
Simonds, RossM05:30PM-06:50PMTBA.TBA
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The St. Thomas Singers is a no-audition choir, open to students and the academic community at large. Rehearsals take place once a week; with at least two concert performances per year towards the end of each term. The course earns one credit per year. A course fee may be required for the purchase of scores and other performance expenses. No previous knowledge of music is necessary.

3898FNAR.2063.A
Tonal Music II
Kutnowski, MartinT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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Offered in the Spring, Music: Harmony and Counterpoint II is the continuation of Music: Harmony and Counterpoint I. These two courses, which should be taken back-to-back, comprise a year-long, hands-on study of the grammar of tonal music, with a particular focus on harmony and counterpoint. Assignments include exercises in four-voice harmony in choral and keyboard styles, exercises in two- and three-voice species counterpoint, the composition of original pieces for small chamber combinations, as well as frequent formal analyses of standard masterpieces from the literature. Students are required to sing and/or play their assignments in class. Prerequisite: FNAR 2053 with a grade of B or better, or permission by the instructor. Recommended co-requisite: FNAR 1041.

3900FNAR.2183.A
Ideas in Art
Peck, RobinT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course focuses on some major ideas in art, art theory, and aesthetics since 1945. Students explore subject matter through lectures, readings, projects, excursions and written assignments relating practical applications with theoretical ideas. Subject matter will consider major visual artists and movements such as Abstract Expressionism, Pop, Minimalism and Conceptual art.

3906FNAR.2251.A
Acting, Singing, Dancing II
Breen, TaniaM W F11:30AM-12:20PMTBA.TBA
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3912FNAR.2273.A
Figure Modeling I
Peck, RobinW02:30PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course is an introduction to the concept of experimental molded sculpture. It is for students who want the freedom to experiment with various concepts of cast sculpture as an introduction to the specific focus of The Portrait Bust course. The class consists of a series of assigned individual projects that will introduce the student to the basic concepts, materials and processes involved in modeling, mold making and the casting of small-scale sculpture. Prerequisite: FNAR 1113.

3918FNAR.2813.B
Chamber Music I
Kutnowski, MartinT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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This class, which can be taken sequentially for up to six semesters, is an in-depth exploration of chamber music. Students perform, arrange, and/or compose music, and develop an intimate analytical and stylistic knowledge of the repertoire. The music is selected from different time periods and musical styles, or composed and adapted to the skills of the individual students. Assignments include reading and rehearsing scores, creating ad-hoc arrangements to adapt the music to the available instruments, composing new pieces, and researching analytical and historical aspects of the music and composers studied. The course concludes with a public concert of chamber music. Prerequisites: FNAR-1051 and FNAR-1023, or permission from the instructor.

3921FNAR.2823.B
Chamber Music II
Kutnowski, MartinT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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This class, which can be taken sequentially for up to six semesters, is an in-depth exploration of chamber music. Students perform, arrange, and/or compose music, and develop an intimate analytical and stylistic knowledge of the repertoire. The music is selected from different time periods and musical styles, or composed and adapted to the skills of the individual students. Assignments include reading and rehearsing scores, creating ad-hoc arrangements to adapt the music to the available instruments, composing new pieces, and researching analytical and historical aspects of the music and composers studied. The course concludes with a public concert of chamber music. Prerequisites: FNAR-1051 and FNAR-1023, or permission from the instructor.

3842FNAR.3051.A2
STU Singers III
Simonds, RossM05:30PM-06:50PMTBA.TBA
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The St. Thomas Singers is a no-audition choir, open to students and the academic community at large. Rehearsals take place once a week; with at least two concert performances per year towards the end of each term. The course earns one credit per year. A course fee may be required for the purchase of scores and other performance expenses. No previous knowledge of music is necessary.

3904FNAR.3233.A
Musical Theatre IV
Breen, TaniaM W F10:30AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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3914FNAR.3313.A
Figure Modeling II
Peck, RobinTH02:30PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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Artists have created portraits of people for thousands of years. In sculpture, a portrait of a person's face often includes the neck and part of the shoulders and chest. These works of sculpture are portrait busts. Students will model life-size three-dimensional portrait bustssin clay from a live model. Students are introduced to various forms of realism and abstraction. It is not necessary to have artistic talent to do well in this course. Prerequisites: FNAR 1113 and FNAR 2273.

3924FNAR.3813.B
Chamber Music III
Kutnowski, MartinT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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This class, which can be taken sequentially for up to six semesters, is an in-depth exploration of chamber music. Students perform, arrange, and/or compose music, and develop an intimate analytical and stylistic knowledge of the repertoire. The music is selected from different time periods and musical styles, or composed and adapted to the skills of the individual students. Assignments include reading and rehearsing scores, creating ad-hoc arrangements to adapt the music to the available instruments, composing new pieces, and researching analytical and historical aspects of the music and composers studied. The course concludes with a public concert of chamber music. Prerequisites: FNAR-1051 and FNAR-1023, or permission from the instructor.

3925FNAR.3823.B
Chamber Music IV
Kutnowski, MartinT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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This class, which can be taken sequentially for up to six semesters, is an in-depth exploration of chamber music. Students perform, arrange, and/or compose music, and develop an intimate analytical and stylistic knowledge of the repertoire. The music is selected from different time periods and musical styles, or composed and adapted to the skills of the individual students. Assignments include reading and rehearsing scores, creating ad-hoc arrangements to adapt the music to the available instruments, composing new pieces, and researching analytical and historical aspects of the music and composers studied. The course concludes with a public concert of chamber music. Prerequisites: FNAR-1051 and FNAR-1023, or permission from the instructor.

3846FNAR.4051.A2
STU Singers IV
Simonds, RossM05:30PM-06:50PMTBA.TBA
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The St. Thomas Singers is a no-audition choir, open to students and the academic community at large. Rehearsals take place once a week; with at least two concert performances per year towards the end of each term. The course earns one credit per year. A course fee may be required for the purchase of scores and other performance expenses. No previous knowledge of music is necessary.

3916FNAR.4393.A
Sp. Proj: Musical Theatre Ped.
Breen, TaniaM W F01:30PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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Students with a creative or scholarly interest in a particular area of Fine Arts may pursue a 3-credit hour independent Special Projects course. Such a course may be focused on music performance, composition, or theory; or photography, drawing, painting, or mixed media. Permission of the instructor is required.

3927FNAR.4813.B
Chamber Music V
Kutnowski, MartinT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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This class, which can be taken sequentially for up to six semesters, is an in-depth exploration of chamber music. Students perform, arrange, and/or compose music, and develop an intimate analytical and stylistic knowledge of the repertoire. The music is selected from different time periods and musical styles, or composed and adapted to the skills of the individual students. Assignments include reading and rehearsing scores, creating ad-hoc arrangements to adapt the music to the available instruments, composing new pieces, and researching analytical and historical aspects of the music and composers studied. The course concludes with a public concert of chamber music. Prerequisites: FNAR-1051 and FNAR-1023, or permission from the instructor.

3929FNAR.4823.B
Chamber Music VI
Kutnowski, MartinT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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This class, which can be taken sequentially for up to six semesters, is an in-depth exploration of chamber music. Students perform, arrange, and/or compose music, and develop an intimate analytical and stylistic knowledge of the repertoire. The music is selected from different time periods and musical styles, or composed and adapted to the skills of the individual students. Assignments include reading and rehearsing scores, creating ad-hoc arrangements to adapt the music to the available instruments, composing new pieces, and researching analytical and historical aspects of the music and composers studied. The course concludes with a public concert of chamber music. Prerequisites: FNAR-1051 and FNAR-1023, or permission from the instructor.

4163FREN.1016.A2
Langue Francaise 1
Staff, T TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]This course is designed for students entering university who achieved a score of Basic, Basic+ or Intermediate in French in high school. The aims of this course are listening comprehension,basic oral expression, elementary reading, writing and grammar.

4165FREN.1016.B2
Langue Francaise 1
Allain, AliceT TH08:30AM-09:50AMTBA.TBA
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]This course is designed for students entering university who achieved a score of Basic, Basic+ or Intermediate in French in high school. The aims of this course are listening comprehension,basic oral expression, elementary reading, writing and grammar.

4387FREN.1016.C2
Langue Francaise 1
Staff, T TH08:30AM-09:50AMTBA.TBA
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]This course is designed for students entering university who achieved a score of Basic, Basic+ or Intermediate in French in high school. The aims of this course are listening comprehension,basic oral expression, elementary reading, writing and grammar.

4167FREN.1026.A2
Langue Francaise 2
Francis, CeciliaT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]This course is designed for New Brunswick students entering university who have achieved a score of Intermediate+ or above in French in high school. The course has a strong reading component with material drawn from a variety of sources in the francophone world. It emphasizes the four skills: oral practice, reading, writing and listening comprehension.

4169FREN.1026.B2
Langue Francaise 2
Gaudet, JeannetteM W F10:30AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]This course is designed for New Brunswick students entering university who have achieved a score of Intermediate+ or above in French in high school. The course has a strong reading component with material drawn from a variety of sources in the francophone world. It emphasizes the four skills: oral practice, reading, writing and listening comprehension.

4171FREN.2306.A2
Textes: niveau 2
Mbarga, ChristianT TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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[Module 1: Langue francaise] Ce cours cherche à approfondir et à étendre les connaissances de base acquises. Par un choix de lectures variées, le cours vise à améliorer la compréhension de textes écrits, à faciliter l'apprentissage du vocabulaire, et à familiariser les étudiants avec le monde et les cultures de la Francophonie.

4173FREN.2316.A2
Grammaire Du Francais
Gaudet, JeannetteM W F12:30PM-01:20PMTBA.TBA
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[Module 1: Langue francaise] Révision et approfondissement des règles de base de la grammaire française: la conjugaison du verbe, les modes et temps du verbe, les accords, les compléments, les pronoms personnels et relatifs. Étude de la forme de la phrase, de la syntaxe et de la fonction des mots. Préalable: FREN 1016 et/ou FREN 1026 ou la permission du professeur.

4175FREN.2326.A2
Composition
Francis, CeciliaT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]Destiné aux étudiants ayant une bonne connaissance des rudiments de la grammaire française, ce cours vise à développer des compétences dans le domaine de la rédaction et de la révision de textes et de travaux écrits. L'étudiant apprendra à structurer et à nuancer sa pensée à l'aide de modalités rhétoriques et de stratégies argumentatives mises en application. Seront privilégiées les pratiques discursives suivantes: le portrait, la description, la narration, l'essai, l'article journalistique, la dissertation classique, l'explication de texte, le compte rendu et la correspondance. Il est fortement recommandé aux étudiants de suivre en même temps le cours FREN 2316. Cours préalable : FREN 1016 ou FREN 1026.

4202FREN.2333.B
Conversational French
Mbarga, ChristianT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]This course is designed for students who wish to improve their abilities in spoken French and listening comprehension. It will focus on developing skills and lexical flexibility for participating actively in a normal converstion with native interlocutors, on presenting and defending opinions on a variety of subjects in social and professional situations. Prerequisite: FREN 2333 is open to students with Intermediate+, or Advanced level of oral proficiency.

4205FREN.3623.A
Civ. Franc 3: Maghreb
Francis, CeciliaT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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[Module 2: Civilisation du monde francophone|Foundation Courses] Dans ce cours, il s'agira de se familiariser avec le Maghreb par la lecture d'un choix de textes (roman, nouvelle, poésie, etc.) représentatifs d'une littérature née dans le contexte de la colonisation. L'imaginaire de cette littérature porte les traces d'une culture orale, pré-islamique, de la rencontre des peuples berbères avec les peuples arabomusulmans, et de ceux-ci avec l'Occident. En adoptant une approche culturelle, on examinera l'esthétique et des principaux thèmes qui font l'originalité de la littérature des pays du Maghreb. Cours préalable: FREN 2306 ou FREN 2113/2123 ou la permission du professeur.

4246FREN.3653.A
Civil. Franc. 5 : Le Théâtre
Staff, T TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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[Module 2: Civilisation du monde francophone|Foundation Courses]Le théâtre, et a fortiori la tragédie, est le produit d'une grande crise de conscience qui, très tôt, secoua la vie de l'homme. En France, les auteurs se fixèrent ainsi pour mission de répondre aux interrogations suscitées par les grandes révolutions idéologiques, culturelles ou sociales qui jalonnent l'histoire de l'humanité. Ce cours se propose de découvrir ces bouleversements à travers l'étude notamment d'un certain nombre de textes représentatifs tant sur le plan théorique que sur le plan de la production théâtrale. Cours préalables : FREN 2123, FREN 2306. Les étudiants ayant suivi FREN 3453 Le théâtre ne sont pas admissibles au cours. Students who have previously taken FREN 3453 are not eligible to take this course.

4161GEND.2016.A2
Intro to Women's Studies
Campbell, MargaretW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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This is the introductory course to the interdisciplinary field of Women's Studies and Gender Studies. The basis of femininity, masculinity and women's inequality are examined in the context of wider social relations, including the historical subject, literary voice and the women's movement.

3721GERO.1023.A
Intro. to Gerontology II
LTA, M W02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course examines the various factors that impact growing older in Canadian society. Topics to be discussed include: health care, pensions, housing, transportation, family life, social support and death and dying.

3722GERO.1023.B
Intro. to Gerontology II
Durkee Lloyd, JanetM06:30PM-09:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course examines the various factors that impact growing older in Canadian society. Topics to be discussed include: health care, pensions, housing, transportation, family life, social support and death and dying.

3723GERO.2113.A
Sociology of Aging
Caissie, LindaT TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course will explore the comparative situation of older women and men in different cultures and different historical periods within western societies. The cultural and social-structural determinants of their changing status will be examined through alternative theoretical perspectives within sociology. The social construction of 'elderly' as a status will be explored through how older people are perceived, described, talked about, and interacted with within everyday behaviour, and how these relations may be 'negotiated' by the elderly themselves. The political economy of aging focuses upon disparities of income, and the determinants and effects of poverty on the lives of older people. Prerequisite: GERO 1013 or SOCI 1003.

3724GERO.2273.A
Death and Dying
Irwin-Kenyon, GaryT06:30PM-09:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course explores a wide range of topics in the area of death and dying. As a fundamental issue for human beings, these phenomena require investigation from a variety of perspectives. The course considers aspects of death and dying that are religious, philosophical, psychological, and sociological in nature. Further, the course is concerned with both practical and theoretical issues that arise from the relationship between aging, and death and dying.

3725GERO.3083.A
Gender and Aging
Caissie, LindaT TH08:30AM-09:50AMTBA.TBA
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This course examines issues involving how one's gender affects one's experience of aging. It looks at how the field of gerontology has traditionally dealt with the concept of gender as well as the feminization of old age, and how this has affected both women's and men's experiences of aging.

4268GERO.3103.A
Active and Successful Aging
Serrat, RodrigoT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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Topic chosen by the Visiting Chair. No prerequisites.

3726GERO.3123.A
Counselling Older Adults
Randall, WilliamT TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course considers several important aspects of counseling, broadly defined, as they impact on work with older adults. Topics include: an overview of counseling theories and strategies; the range of emotional, developmental, spiritual, and interpersonal issues for which older adults might seek or need counseling (e.g., substance abuse, elder abuse, bereavement, depression); the benefits of alternative therapeutic modalities (music therapy, pet therapy, etc.); and the value of reminiscence and life review - or narrative care - in working with older adults. This course is most relevant to those preparing to work professionally in the field of aging. Limited enrolment. Prerequisites: GERO 1013 and GERO 1023.

3727GERO.3233.A
Aging and Tai Chi
Irwin-Kenyon, GaryT TH08:30AM-09:50AMTBA.TBA
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Tai Chi is a mind-body-spirit intervention that contributes to the maximization of quality of life for both frail and well adults. This course explores the philosophy and principles that form the basis of the art of Tai Chi. The course will also review research that demonstrates a range of health benefits of Tai Chi to adults of all ages, physical and psychological. Participants in the course will learn basic Tai Chi movements, and be introduced to guidelines for designing a program based on Tai Chi, for implementation in a variety of settings. The course will be of interest to students contemplating a career in gerontology, recreation, social work, education, or fine arts. The course is introductory and does not assume any experience on the part of the students.

3729GERO.4023.A
Advan Seminar in Gerontology
Randall, WilliamM06:30PM-09:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course is intended for students in the final semester of the program. It consists of a multidisciplinary lecture-seminar format. Selected topics in aging research and intervention are discussed, including those that highlight the positive potential of the aging experience, e.g., the potential for creativity, wisdom, and continued personal growth. The purpose of this course is to ensure that students have a comprehensive background in the field of aging. Prerequisites: GERO 1013, GERO 1023 and an additional 18 credit hours of courses.

3633GRID.2206.A
Human Nature and Tech.
Cornell, ChristineM W F10:30AM-12:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will study the way in which diverse thinkers have considered the question of human nature. This question will be sharpened with a consideration of the way in which human beings considered as natural beings use and are affected by technology. Texts will vary from year to year, but may include works such as: Aeschylus' Prometheus Bound, Bacon's New Atlantis, Swift's Gulliver's Travels, Grant's Technology and Empire, Miller's A Canticle for Leibowitz, Heidegger's The Question Concerning Technology, Shelley's Frankenstein, Gaskell's North and South, Achebe's Things Fall Apart, and Sterling's Holy Fire.

3634GRID.3506.A
Freedom
Bateman, ThomasM W F12:30PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will examine the nature of freedom in the context of human life and community. Questions to be addressed will include: To what extent are human beings free by nature? Should political communities promote freedom? What might be appropriate limitations on our freedom? Texts may include Sophocles' Oedipus Rex, Plato's Crito, Aquinas' On Free Will, Shakespeare's Coriolanus, and Hegel's The Philosophy of Right. Prerequisite: GRID 2006 and GRID 2106.

3635GRID.3903.A
Honours Thesis Proposal
Dinan, MatthewTH06:30PM-09:20PMTBA.TBA
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The purpose of this course is to afford students interested in writing an honours thesis the opportunity to develop a thorough proposal, including a substantial annotated bibliography. Students will work closely with their thesis director in developing and writing the thesis proposal. Classes will meet throughout the term to assess progress. Students will be required to present and defend their proposal before their classmates and the faculty of the Great Ideas Programme. Students must complete this course to be eligible for GRID 4906.

3636GRID.4903.A
Honours Seminar
Staff, W02:30PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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This seminar will be centred on the intensive study of the text(s) of a thinker who has greatly influenced the shape of the western world. The texts may be ancient or modern, and may be literary, historical, philosophic, and/or political in nature.

3659HIST.1006.A2
World History
Cross, BradleyT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[1. World]This course provides an overview of world history, from earliest times to the present. Major themes include human relationships with the environment, cultural exchanges between peoples, and the interconnectedness of the human experience. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1013 or HIST 1023.

3690HIST.1023.A
World History Since 1400
Watt, CareyM W F01:30PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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[1. World] This 3-credit course is part of the world history survey. It offers an overview of world history events, issues, themes and approaches from roughly 1400 of the Common Era (CE) to the present. It will cover topics such as the emergence of long-distance exploration, cross-cultural interaction, the early modern and modern worlds, the Columbian Exchange, industrialization, modern imperialism, world wars, networks and globalization from circa 1400 onward. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1006. Students may take HIST 1023 before HIST 1013.

3692HIST.1023.B
World History Since 1400
Torrie, JuliaT TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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[1. World] This 3-credit course is part of the world history survey. It offers an overview of world history events, issues, themes and approaches from roughly 1400 of the Common Era (CE) to the present. It will cover topics such as the emergence of long-distance exploration, cross-cultural interaction, the early modern and modern worlds, the Columbian Exchange, industrialization, modern imperialism, world wars, networks and globalization from circa 1400 onward. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1006. Students may take HIST 1023 before HIST 1013.

3694HIST.2003.B
Exploring History
Gebrekidan, FikruW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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[10. Special]This mandatory course for History Majors and Honours students provides an introduction to the discipline of History. The course examines a variety of historiographical and method- ological approaches to History, as well as the history of History. It encourages students to re-examine their assumptions about History, but it will also help students develop their basic historical research and writing skills. Exploring History provides a foundation for upper-year History courses and students are strongly encouraged to take it before their third year. Prerequisite: At least 6 credit hours in History courses at St. Thomas University.

3695HIST.2113.A
War & Famine in Horn of Africa
Gebrekidan, FikruT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[2. Regions (Africa)]This is a course on the history of Northeastern Africa, with a focus on Ethiopia, the most populous country in the region. Northeastern Africa, commonly known as the Horn of Africa, consists of Somalia, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Sudan. Designed with history and non- history Majors in mind, the course will explore major landmark events in the history of this region from antiquity to the present.

3697HIST.2183.A
History of Modern India
Watt, CareyT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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[8. State, Nation, and Locality (Asia)]The course explores the history of the Indian subcontinent from c. 1500 onward. It considers the Mughals, the 18th-century successor states, British colonialism, Indian nationalism and postcolonial India to the present day.

3667HIST.2206.A2
History of the Middle Ages
Vose, RobinM W F12:30PM-01:20PMTBA.TBA
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[6. Regions (Europe)]A survey of the imagined historical period between the fall of the classical Roman and Persian Empires and the emergence of an early modern state system. This course will range widely in its coverage, including glimpses of experience in parts of Africa and Asia as well as Europe. Special emphasis will be placed on social history and the use of primary sources to probe beyond simplified political narratives.

3700HIST.2433.A
Comp. Hist. of North America
Huskins, BonnieT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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[4. Regions (The Americas)]This course is designed to acquaint students with broad developments in the history of North America. In the course of studying the North American continent, we will examine the experiences of contact between indigenous and immigrant cultures; the transmission of European ideas and institutions to the American hemisphere; the influence of the Atlantic system of commerce on regional economies; and the struggles of various peoples in the Americas to define themselves and others. Students will be asked to draw connections between major events and occurrences, and to find coherence in different events.

3702HIST.3033.A
Gender in Early Modern Europe
Mullin, JanetT TH08:30AM-09:50AMTBA.TBA
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[6. Regions (Europe)] Europe's early modern period (c. 1450-1800) was a time of political tumult, religious conflict, and seismic shifts in centuries-old institutions. The resulting social changes were profound; new roles emerged for men and women as new questions were asked and new norms evolved. This course takes a thematic approach to the changing lives of men and women, examining the role of gender in both the major events and the everyday realities of the period.

3704HIST.3203.A
The Briti. Atlan. World
Huskins, BonnieM W04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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[3. Regions (Oceans)]This course explores the social, political, and economic parameters of the Atlantic World from roughly 1500 to 1800. The course centres on the British experience of the Atlantic through a comparative and trans-national approach. Particular attention will be drawn to the role of Atlantic Canada and its connection to the larger Atlantic World.

3706HIST.3223.A
The Medieval Church
Vose, RobinM W F10:30AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[6. Regions (Europe)]This course deals with the history of the Church from the time of Gregory the Great in the sixth century to the end of the fifteenth century. For the most part we will deal with the Western Church, although there will be some treatment of the relations that existed with the East. The theme that will run throughout the course is that of the interaction between the Church and the society of this period. Among the topics that will be covered will be the Merovingian and Carolingian Church and the role of such leaders as Charlemagne, the Gregorian Reform Movement and the clash with the Emperor, the development and contribution to medieval society, the emergence of the pilgrimage and the crusade, the religious unrest of the later Middle Ages, and the growth of the medieval papacy.

3707HIST.3373.A
The Germanies Since 1945
Torrie, JuliaT TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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[9. State, Nation, and Locality (Europe)]The defeat of Nazi Germany and the falling-out of the victors led to the enforced division of Germany. By 1949, two separate German states had come into existence: the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) and the German Democratic Republic (East Germany). This course examines the history of Germany from the end of the Second World War to the present.

3708HIST.3883.A
Women & Gender in Mod. Canada
Gidney, CatherineW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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[7. State, Nation, and Locality (The Americas)] This discussion-based course examines gender and women's history in Canada from c. 1850 to c. 1980. It addresses traditional historical topics in the field (industrialization, the Great Depression, World War Two, etc.) as well as emerging topics such as sport, consumerism, and student culture. Our approach will be both chronological and thematic. Prerequisite: HIST 2913 or permission of the instructor.

3709HIST.3983.A
Topics: Pre-Modern World Hist.
Vose, RobinT TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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[1. World]This course will explore specific topics in pre-modern world history. For information regarding course content students should contact the Chair of the History Department. Pre-requisite: 9 credit hours in History, or permission of the instructor.

3672HIST.4106.A2
Research Sem. in Material Hist
Cross, BradleyW02:30PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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[1. World] This research seminar course examines the practices and products of doing history through things in a comparative and global perspective. Until recently, historians have relied heavily on written documents for evidence, and this course challenges that approach. This course will consider some of the methods used to write history using physical things, as well as the varied literature produced by the study of material culture. Participants will produce a historical research paper based on significant use of material objects.

3674HIST.4126.A2
Race & Racism in Modern Hist
Gebrekidan, FikruT02:30PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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[1. World]This course will examine specific themes in global history. The topics will change from year to year, but might include issues such as the role of cities in history, the rise and fall of peasantries, patterns of migration, the emergence of global institutions, cultural and material exchanges, and the possibilities of a global environmental history.

3655HMRT.1006.A2
Introduction to Human Rights
Comeau, MichaelM W05:30PM-06:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course will introduce students to the study of human rights by investigating the question what is a human right? The course will proceed primarily through a number of examples and case studies. Students will also be given an overview of the basic instruments, institutions, and ideas relevant to human rights.

3657HMRT.1006.B2
Introduction to Human Rights
Szurlej, ChristinaT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will introduce students to the study of human rights by investigating the question what is a human right? The course will proceed primarily through a number of examples and case studies. Students will also be given an overview of the basic instruments, institutions, and ideas relevant to human rights.

3678HMRT.1006.C2
Introduction to Human Rights
Ripley, AJM W F11:30AM-12:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will introduce students to the study of human rights by investigating the question what is a human right? The course will proceed primarily through a number of examples and case studies. Students will also be given an overview of the basic instruments, institutions, and ideas relevant to human rights.

3696HMRT.2013.A
Research Methods
Baker, KellyM W02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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The purpose of this course is to give students an introduction to research methods used in the study of human rights. The course will include methods of data collection as well as analysis of data. The course will begin with a general introduction to the aims and methods of research projects. Students in this course will do a research project in human rights under the supervision of the instructor. Students will be expected to present periodic reports on the status of their work.

3699HMRT.2033.A
Human Rights Theory
Barry, ConorM W05:30PM-06:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course critically analyzes different theories concerning the practice of human rights as a framework for social justice. A variety of texts from thinkers such as Rawls, Grant, Locke, Marx, DuBois, and De Tocqueville will be used to analyze theories of justice, liberty, equality, solidarity, and legal certainty. This course will also examine the critiques of rights and the limitations of the international human rights movement and framework.

4154HMRT.3013.A
Discrimination and the Law
Ripley, AJT TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course will focus on domestic human rights codes and human rights commissions. Special attention will be given to the New Brunswick Human Rights Code and the New Brunswick Human Rights Commission.

3701HMRT.3073.A
Human Rights Internship
Szurlej, ChristinaW02:30PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will provide students with exposure to the practice of human rights by completing a supervised internship with a local non-governmental organization. Students will be required to complete a detailed exit report and research paper that encourages them to reflect on the relationship between that experience and their formal human rights studies.

3703HMRT.3123.A
International Human Rights
Szurlej, ChristinaT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course explicates the principal international and regional systems in place for the protection and promotion of human rights, including the Inter-American, European, African, and United Nations systems. Students will study the most important human rights instruments, such as the International Bill of Rights, the European Convention on Human Rights, and the American Convention on Human Rights.

3705HMRT.3203.A
Human Rights and Media
Ripley, AJW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course explores how the rise of social media has both advanced and hindered the protection of human rights by examining how social media provides a platform for instantaneous global information-sharing, rendering it increasingly difficult for state or business interests to shield human rights abuses from public scrutiny. Topics will be examined through a number of case studies. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this course.

3652IRSH.2006.A2
Intro. to Irish Studies
Nolan, LorraineM04:00PM-06:50PMTBA.TBA
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A general introduction to Irish society and culture. This course will provide an overview of the unique characteristics of the island and its people. Students will have the opportunity to familiarize themselves with aspects of Ireland's land, cultural development, economy, politics, and literature.

3653IRSH.2113.A
Visualizing Irish Culture
Nolan, LorraineT02:30PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will examine the broad influence of the arts on Ireland through the history of Irish poetry, painting, drama, music, architecture, religion, fiction, and film. Prerequisite: IRSH 2006 or permission of the instructor.

4377IRSH.2183.A
Irish Language and Culture II
Farrell, DeanW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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A continuation of IRSH 2173. This course will follow on from the first semester, building on students knowledge of the Irish Language so far. The course will focus more on topics practical to students to practise their Irish here in Canada and also if they find themselves in a real-life situation in Irish-speaking Ireland (e.g. making enquiries, interests, sport, food and drink, asking directions). The course will focus on the four skills of speaking, writing, reading and listening. Students will develop their speaking ability as well as their ability to converse. Students will continue to learn more about Irish culture on this topic-by-topic basis throughout. Prerequisite: IRSH 2173.

4177ITAL.1006.A2
Introduction to Italian
Temelini, MarkM W F12:30PM-01:20PMTBA.TBA
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[Italian]Introduction to the Italian Language. Phonetics, oral training, and conversation. Basic grammar with oral and written exercises. Basic reading and composition. Introduction to Italian civilization with the aid of audio-visual techniques.

4206ITAL.2043.A
Intermediate Italian II
Temelini, MarkM W F01:30PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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[Italian] This course is the continuation of Intermediate Italian I. Written assignments will improve the accuracy of grammatical structures. Conversation and oral exercises will enhance the student's ability to interact in a communicative environment.

4031JOUR.1023.B
The Message:Great Stor. Jour
Camp, MichaelT TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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[1. Journalism]This course will introduce students to a range of works of print and broadcast Journalism to allow them to understand the scope, purpose, and influence of stories in the journalistic tradition. Students will respond to these works in writing and post their responses in an online discussion forum.

4032JOUR.1023.C
The Message:Great Stor. Jour
Lee, PhilipW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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[1. Journalism]This course will introduce students to a range of works of print and broadcast Journalism to allow them to understand the scope, purpose, and influence of stories in the journalistic tradition. Students will respond to these works in writing and post their responses in an online discussion forum.

4033JOUR.2033.A
Local Reporting, Global Media
Tunney, MarkT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[1. Journalism] This course explores the art of reporting and storytelling, allowing students to create and digitally publish local stories that become part of a global media network.

4034JOUR.2123.A
The Toolbox 2- Mobile Soc Med
Dickson, DonaldT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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[1. Journalism] This course introduces students to media production and storytelling, publication, podcasting and broadcasting using mobile technology and social media. Prerequisite: JOUR 2113 or permission of professor.

4035JOUR.3023.A
Radio and Podcasting
Tunney, MarkM04:00PM-06:50PMTBA.TBA
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[1. Journalism] This course explores the enduring power and influence of radio, and will allow students to produce podcasts and programming for a campus and community radio network. Prerequisite: JOUR 2123 or permission of professor.

4036JOUR.3173.A
Interviewing
Wong, JanM W02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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[1. Journalism] This course explores the art of the interview and the art of inquiry, allowing students to understand how to effectively ask and answer questions.

4218JOUR.3703.A
Journalism and Public Opinion
Camp, MichaelW06:30PM-09:20PMTBA.TBA
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[1. Journalism]Students in this course will explore theoretical issues in journalistic commentary and learn fundamental skills related to the writing or production of print and spoken word editorials. In the process, the course will focus on examples of journalistic commentaries of the past century that have shaped and directed public opinion, the power that drives political, social, and cultural change. Classes will include lectures, group projects, and one-on-one skills development with the professor. Prerequisites: JOUR 1113 OR COPP 2013, or by permission of instructor.

3967JOUR.4106.A2
Senior Seminar in Journalism
Wong, JanT02:30PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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[1. Journalism] Students will produce community-based digital journalism projects supervised by faculty and explore the ethics of producing journalism in the public interest.

4152JPNS.1023.A
Introductory Japanese II
Nishijima, MichikoT TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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Continuation of JPNS-1013. Focuses on communicative aspects as well as practice of reading and writing in Hiragana and Katakana. Some basic Kanji, the other writing system in Japanese, is introduced. Not open to native speakers.

4374LAPS.1003.A
Intro to Law,Politics&Society
Bateman, ThomasM W F11:30AM-12:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will introduce students to the relationships between law, politics, and Canadian society. Students will examine types of law, the judicial system, the legal profession, and the institutional, social, and cultural contexts in which laws are made and enforced. The course will engage students in debates about citizen rights, the policy-making role of courts, aboriginal peoples and the law, public opinion and the legislative process, media and the law, and other topical issues.

4207LATI.1023.A
Introduction to Latin II
James, ArthurT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[Latin]This course continues the introduction to classical Latin. Prerequisite: LATI 1013 with a minimum grade of C.

3731MATH.1023.A
Introduction to Calculus II
Gupta, SaritaT TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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Conic sections; transcendental functions and their derivatives; techniques of integration; areas and volumes; Taylor's theorem. Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in MATH 1013.

3578NATI.1006.A2
Intro to Native Studies
Landry, MarkT06:30PM-09:20PMTBA.TBA
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of Native Studies. Its purpose is to increase the student's understanding and sensitivity towards the past and present experience of Native peoples. Using both oral and written records, the course will examine pre-contact history and culture, the influences of colonialism in the post-contact era, and contemporary issues.

3585NATI.3623.A
Native Educ & Colonization
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will examine traditional forms and philosophies of education in Native societies, and the changes that have occurred since contact and colonization. It will also examine the formal education of Natives by the immigrant society as indoctrination for civilization and assimilation. It will look closely at residential and day schools in Canada and the United States and the effect they have had on contemporary Native societies and cultures. Special attention will be given to the relationship between education and cultural survival, and the importance for Native people to reclaim and control the education of their children. Prerequisite: NATI 3603 or permission of the instructor.

3586NATI.3853.A
Alc. Drugs, and Indig. Peoples
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course provides an introduction to issues of alcohol and drug use/abuse in indigenous communities (concentrating on Canada for the most part, but including reference to such issues in other indigenous communities worldwide). Traditional uses of substances which alter consciousness are reviewed, as well as the role that the introduction of unfamiliar psychoactive substances played in European expansionism and colonialism. Modern models of addiction and programs for recovery are critically examined and placed within the context of creating a continuing marginalization of indigenous cultures by dominating ones.

3587NATI.3863.A
Native Public Health
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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Health statistics show Native Peoples in Canada as public health disasters: high rates of diabetes, tuberculosis, cancer, suicide, AIDS, etc. are regularly reported. Standard accounts typically find a way of attributing the problems to Indians themselves (e.g., genetic explanations or lifestyle choices). We critically examine the methodologically-individualistic biases of standard accounts of Indian ill-heath and place Native public health issues in an historical and materialist framework instead. Alternative forms of interventions are also considered.

3588NATI.3923.A
Aboriginal Rts: Land Question
Landry, MarkW06:30PM-09:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will examine the concept of Aboriginal rights pertaining to land entitlement in Canada and the United States. It will include case studies focusing on the Maritimes, Quebec, MacKenzie Valley, British Columbia, Alaska, and Maine.

3743PHIL.1023.A
Intro to Philosophy II
Robinson, MatthewT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[1. Introductory]A continuation of the survey of developments in western philosophy, through lecture, reading of original sources, and discussion, from the early modern period to contemporary discussion. Focus: rationalism, empiricism, idealism, and the reactions these provoked. This course has no prerequisite.

3744PHIL.1023.B
Intro to Philosophy II
Gilbert-Walsh, JamesT TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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[1. Introductory]A continuation of the survey of developments in western philosophy, through lecture, reading of original sources, and discussion, from the early modern period to contemporary discussion. Focus: rationalism, empiricism, idealism, and the reactions these provoked. This course has no prerequisite.

3745PHIL.1023.C
Intro to Philosophy II
Ranger, Jean-PhilippeM W F10:30AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[1. Introductory]A continuation of the survey of developments in western philosophy, through lecture, reading of original sources, and discussion, from the early modern period to contemporary discussion. Focus: rationalism, empiricism, idealism, and the reactions these provoked. This course has no prerequisite.

3746PHIL.1043.A
Free Will: An Intro. to Phil.
Stapleford, ScottT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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[1. Introductory]This course is an introduction to philosophy focusing on the problem of free will. Students will be introduced to the current debate, but will also consider what the great minds of the past can tell us about the possibility or impossibility of acting freely. We will draw on both historical and contemporary sources, developing skills of philosophical analysis in connection with a single, hotly disputed topic. This course has no prerequisite.

3747PHIL.2143.A
Medieval Philosophy
Robinson, MatthewT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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[2. History of Philosophy]A lecture course covering the Medieval philosophy of the 13th century (especially Thomas Aquinas), the collapse of the Thomistic synthesis in fourteenth century philosophy, and the beginning of the Modern outlook. Prerequisites: Any two of PHIL 1013, 1023, 1033, 1043, 1053, 1063, or permission of the instructor.

3748PHIL.2263.A
The Art of Living
Ranger, Jean-PhilippeM W F12:30PM-01:20PMTBA.TBA
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[3. Moral Philosophy] Can Greek philosophers help us live a fulfilling life? This course examines a rich tradition known as therapy for the mind, that developed from Socrates to Hellenistic Philosophy. These thinkers argue that philosophy improves many facets of our lives and can help us become happy. What do they have to say about happiness, emotions, desires, love, and death? Can this advice be useful for us today? The course presupposes no background in philosophy. Prerequisites: none.

3749PHIL.2533.A
Minds and Brains
Stapleford, ScottM W02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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[5. Themes and Authors] What is a mind? Is the mind reducible to the brain? If not, how are they related? Various answers to these questions will be considered in the course. Topics will normally include: behaviourism, functionalism, dualism, identity theory, representational theory, consciousness, the intentional stance, eliminativism, property dualism, non-reductive physicalism. The course presupposes no background in philosophy and may be of interest to students in psychology and the life sciences, as well as philosophy. Prerequisites: none.

3750PHIL.3673.A
Analytic Philosophy: Theories
Stapleford, ScottT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[5. Themes and Authors]This course is meant to complement PHIL 3663, but it may be taken independently. It is a lecture course covering topics of current interest in Analytic Philosophy, a movement in, and a style of doing, philosophy that has been prominent in the English-speaking world since the beginning of the 20th century. Topics will vary and will normally be drawn from one or more of the following sub-disciplines: epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, philosophy of science. Prerequisites: Any two of PHIL 1013, 1023, 1033, 1043, 1053, 1063, or permission of the instructor.

3751PHIL.3763.A
Martin Heidegger
Gilbert-Walsh, JamesT TH08:30AM-09:50AMTBA.TBA
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[5. Themes and Authors]In this course, we will engage in a close reading of selected works by Martin Heidegger. We will consider Heidegger's attempt to raise anew the urgent question of being; specifically, how his development of this question demands a radical assessment of many of our most dearly held assumptions about truth, human nature, knowledge and reality, freedom and responsibility, history and time. Pre-requisites: Either PHIL 3653 or PHIL 3583, or permission of the instructor

3767POLS.1603.B
Global Politics
Masciulli, JosephM W F01:30PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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[1. Introductory]This course provides an introduction to the concepts of nation and state, sovereignty, forms of government, and political conflict. It does so through consideration of issues in world politics, such as human rights and social justice, ecological imbalance, economic inequalities, war, global governmental institutions and organizations.

3769POLS.1603.C
Global Politics
Horgan, GerardT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[1. Introductory]This course provides an introduction to the concepts of nation and state, sovereignty, forms of government, and political conflict. It does so through consideration of issues in world politics, such as human rights and social justice, ecological imbalance, economic inequalities, war, global governmental institutions and organizations.

3770POLS.2313.A
Comp Pol Developing World
Horgan, GerardT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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[3. Comparative Government and Politics]This course introduces students to the comparative study of governments in the developing world. It focuses on such issues as the politics of development, modernization, and the interplay of political and social forces in selected developing nations. Prerequisite: 3 credits in Political Science.

3783POLS.2623.A
International Relations II
Narine, ShaunM W F12:30PM-01:20PMTBA.TBA
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[4. International Relations and Foreign Policy]This course introduces students to the critical and non-mainstream variants of International Relations (IR) theory. These include Marxism, Gramscianism, feminist theories of IR, and other forms of critical theory. These theories are illustrated and developed through the use of case studies and examinations of the institutions and structures of the international system. They are also contrasted with mainstream IR theories. Prerequisite: POLS 1013 or permission of the instructor.

3784POLS.2813.A
The Western Trad Pol. Phil II
Malcolmson, PatrickM W04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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[5. Political Philosophy]This course will introduce students to seminal texts in political philosophy focussing on the medieval, early modern and modern periods. Texts may include: Aquinas' Treatise on Law, Machiavelli's The Prince, Hobbes' Leviathan, Locke's The Second Treatise on Government, Rousseau's Discourses, Hegel's Introduction to the Philosophy of History. Prerequisite: POLS 2803.

3785POLS.3213.A
Media and Politics in Canada
McHardie, DanielM W04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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[2. Canadian Government and Politics] This course will examine the role of media in Canadian politics and government. It will examine the effect of media on policy agenda setting and public opinion, and how political elites seek to use media to advance political goals. Prerequisites: POLS 1013 or consent of instructor.

3786POLS.3333.A
Introduction to Political Econ
Narine, ShaunW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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[3. Comparative Government and Politics]The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the study of political economy as a subfield of political science. The first part of the course examines main conceptual frameworks in the study of the relationship between states and markets on the basis of classic readings. The second part of the course covers topics in market regulation, politics of development, and international political economy. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours from POLS 1000 level or permission of the instructor.

3787POLS.3603.A
The United Nations
McMorris Tate, TrevorT TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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[4. International Relations and Foreign Policy]This course will examine the UN as an international political institution, its structure and processes in the context of contemporary and enduring issues of world politics, including peace, security, development, and environmental sustainability.

3788POLS.3823.A
Modern Political Philosophy
Malcolmson, PatrickTH06:30PM-09:20PMTBA.TBA
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[5. Political Philosophy]The focus of this course is on the problems modern political philosophy has confronted in attempting to show how nature can be used as a standard for judging the best life and the just political order. The writings of one or two of the following authors will be considered: Machiavelli, Hobbes, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Burke, Jefferson, Nietzsche, and Heidegger. Prerequisite: POLS 2803 and 2813 (or 2806) or permission of the instructor.

3753POLS.3913.A2
Thesis Proposal
Bateman, ThomasT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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[6. Honours]The purpose of this course is to afford students who seek to write the Honours thesis an opportunity to develop a thorough thesis proposal, including a substantial annotated bibliography. A small number of classes will be held at the beginning of the course in order to show students how to prepare the proposal. Thereafter, the class will meet only occasionally.

3789POLS.4303.A
Sem. in Comparative Politics
Horgan, GerardT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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[3. Comparative Government and Politics]Designed as an upper-level seminar for students of Political Science, this course will focus on theories of comparative politics and their application to a major issue of interest to the discipline. Prerequisite: POLS 2303 and 2313, or permission of the instructor.

4096PSYC.1013.F
Intro. to Psychology I
Gunn, CarlaM W F10:30AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, history of psychology, brain and behaviour, sensation and perception, learning, memory, and cognition.

4098PSYC.1013.G
Intro. to Psychology I
Gunn, CarlaT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, history of psychology, brain and behaviour, sensation and perception, learning, memory, and cognition.

4100PSYC.1023.D
Intro. to Psychology II
LTA, T TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, developmental psychology, intelligence and creativity, personality, abnormal behaviour and therapy, social psychology, and applied topics.

4102PSYC.1023.E
Intro. to Psychology II
LTA, T TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, developmental psychology, intelligence and creativity, personality, abnormal behaviour and therapy, social psychology, and applied topics.

4104PSYC.1023.F
Intro. to Psychology II
Gunn, CarlaM W F11:30AM-12:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, developmental psychology, intelligence and creativity, personality, abnormal behaviour and therapy, social psychology, and applied topics.

4106PSYC.1023.G
Intro. to Psychology II
Randall, HilaryM W F10:30AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, developmental psychology, intelligence and creativity, personality, abnormal behaviour and therapy, social psychology, and applied topics.

4107PSYC.1023.H
Intro. to Psychology II
Randall, HilaryM W04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, developmental psychology, intelligence and creativity, personality, abnormal behaviour and therapy, social psychology, and applied topics.

4108PSYC.2013.C
Introduction to Statistics
Claybourn, MarvinT TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course focuses on statistics used by psychologists to describe and analyze research data. Course content will include a comprehensive coverage of descriptive statistics and an introduction to inferential statistics and hypothesis testing procedures. Students must take 2013 in their second year.

4110PSYC.2013.D
Introduction to Statistics
Prior, SuzanneM W02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course focuses on statistics used by psychologists to describe and analyze research data. Course content will include a comprehensive coverage of descriptive statistics and an introduction to inferential statistics and hypothesis testing procedures. Students must take 2013 in their second year.

4111PSYC.2013.E
Introduction to Statistics
Prior, SuzanneT TH08:30AM-09:50AMTBA.TBA
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This course focuses on statistics used by psychologists to describe and analyze research data. Course content will include a comprehensive coverage of descriptive statistics and an introduction to inferential statistics and hypothesis testing procedures. Students must take 2013 in their second year.

4113PSYC.2023.C
Intro to Research Methods
Higgins, NancyT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course focuses on methods used by psychologists to conduct research. Course content will include comprehensive coverage of the scientific method, the logic of experimental design, ethics, and report writing. In addition, students will be required to write research papers and may be asked to design and/or conduct their own research projects. Students must take 2023 in their second year.

4114PSYC.2023.D
Intro to Research Methods
Bourque, WendyW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course focuses on methods used by psychologists to conduct research. Course content will include comprehensive coverage of the scientific method, the logic of experimental design, ethics, and report writing. In addition, students will be required to write research papers and may be asked to design and/or conduct their own research projects. Students must take 2023 in their second year.

4115PSYC.2113.A
Sensation
Bourque, WendyM W F01:30PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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An introduction to the study of sensation. The emphasis will be on vision and hearing. The course will begin with an examination of the stimuli and the structure and function of the receptors. Other topics will include the psychophysical methods, sensory scaling, and a survey of data on several senses. These topics can be varied to suit the interests of the students.

4117PSYC.2163.B
Drugs and Behaviour
Bourque, WendyM W F11:30AM-12:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will examine the measurable effects of drugs on naturally occurring and experimentally-controlled behaviour. Drug action will be evaluated based on its effects on the nervous system and behaviour. Social issues of drug use, such as addiction and legalization, will be covered. The mechanisms involved in psychotherapeutic uses of drugs, including their immediate and long-term effects, will also be reviewed.

4119PSYC.2183.B
Human Sexuality
Stelzl, MonikaT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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The course surveys topics in human sexuality that have attracted the attention of researchers and theorists from many different areas of psychology. Fundamental questions concerning the nature, development, and expression of human sexuality will be addressed along with specific issues of contemporary concern.

4120PSYC.2183.C
Human Sexuality
Stelzl, MonikaT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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The course surveys topics in human sexuality that have attracted the attention of researchers and theorists from many different areas of psychology. Fundamental questions concerning the nature, development, and expression of human sexuality will be addressed along with specific issues of contemporary concern.

4123PSYC.2263.A
Cognitive Psychology
Thomson, SandraM W F10:30AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course will introduce students to current theories of human mental processes and the methods used to study them. Topics may include attention, memory, language comprehension and production, concepts, imagery, judgment, decision-making, and problem solving.

4124PSYC.2263.B
Cognitive Psychology
Thomson, SandraM W F11:30AM-12:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will introduce students to current theories of human mental processes and the methods used to study them. Topics may include attention, memory, language comprehension and production, concepts, imagery, judgment, decision-making, and problem solving.

4125PSYC.2313.A
Personality Psychology
Staff, T TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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Introduction to the nature, study, and conceptualization of personality. Historical and contemporary theoretical perspectives of personality will be critically examined, and applications will be discussed.

4127PSYC.2413.C
Social Psychology
Higgins, NancyT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will review a variety of topics within social psychology including social cognition and social perception, attitudes and attitude change, understanding the self, interpersonal attraction, persuasion, conformity, prejudice, aggression, and altruism.

4128PSYC.2613.C
Developmental: Phys &Emotional
Randall, HilaryW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course will cover various aspects of development including prenatal development, physical development from birth through puberty, motor development, emotional development, and the development of a sense of self and identity.

4130PSYC.2623.B
Developmental: Cognitive & Soc
Randall, HilaryT TH08:30AM-09:50AMTBA.TBA
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This course will cover age-related changes in language and cognition as well as the development of gender roles and schemas, moral development, peer relations, and the influence of such factors as families and the media.

4133PSYC.2643.C
Abnormal Psychology
Staff, T TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course examines issues in the diagnosis and treatment of the most common psychological disorders in adulthood. Students are introduced to the history of psychopathology, from primitive to modern times, which traces the development of biological, psychodynamic, behavioural, cognitive, and sociocultural models of abnormality. Possible topics include: anxiety disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenia, and personality disorders.

4135PSYC.2643.D
Abnormal Psychology
LTA, M W F12:30PM-01:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course examines issues in the diagnosis and treatment of the most common psychological disorders in adulthood. Students are introduced to the history of psychopathology, from primitive to modern times, which traces the development of biological, psychodynamic, behavioural, cognitive, and sociocultural models of abnormality. Possible topics include: anxiety disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenia, and personality disorders.

4137PSYC.3153.A
Adv. Biol. Bases of Psyc
Bancroft, TylerT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course continues the exploration of the biological basis of behaviour. The material covered in this course is relevant to many areas of psychology. The course content will build directly from PSYC 2153 and cover biological bases of language, and sensation and perception, learning and memory, psychological disorders, and sleep and consciousness. Prerequisite: PSYC 2153.

4138PSYC.3183.A
Sexuality and Diversity
Stelzl, MonikaW02:30PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will encourage students to critically examine the diverse factors that contribute to how sexuality is conceptualised and represented. Multiple perspectives, including cultural, psychosocial, and biological, will be considered. Possible topics include sexual orientation, varieties in sexual development and expression, attraction, and psychological perspectives on sex as a commodity. Prerequisites: PSYC 2183.

4140PSYC.3613.A
Models of Psychotherapy-Adults
Lafrance, MichelleT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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A survey of the principles and theories of counselling and psychotherapy, especially as methods of facilitating individual change. Major attention will be given to the various theories and the theoretical behaviour systems on which they are based. Attention will also be given to the goals, techniques, and the philosophy and concepts of each theory. Prerequisite: PSYC 2643.

4142PSYC.3733.A
Developmental Psycholinguistic
Prior, SuzanneT TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course examines current theories and research on the development of language in children. Topics may include the nature of language, the biological basis of language development, the development of different components of language (phonology, semantics, syntax, pragmatics), language development in special populations, and childhood bilingualism. Prerequisites: PSYC 2613 and 2623, or permission of the instructor.

4144PSYC.3813.A
Psy Testing & Assessment
Claybourn, MarvinT TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course is intended as a general introduction to psychological testing and assessment. The primary objective is to familiarize students with the main varieties of psychological tests together with the theoretical rationale behind their development. Special attention will be given to evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of assessment procedures. Consideration will be given to ethical questions involved in testing, as well as technical issues in test construction. Prerequisite: PSYC 2013 and 2023.

4145PSYC.3943.A
Advanced Research
Bancroft, TylerT TH08:30AM-09:50AMTBA.TBA
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This course is designed to prepare students for writing an honours thesis and for overall participation in the honours programme. The course will focus primarily on the written and presentational aspects of a psychological research project, the peer review process, and on various ethical considerations when conducting a study. Discussion of various experimental and non-experimental methods will be embedded within the primary course content. Prerequisites: PSYC 2013, PSYC 2023, and PSYC 3933.

4146PSYC.4263.A
Seminar in Cognitive Psyc
Thomson, SandraM W02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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Advanced exploration of theoretical and empirical work in one or more areas of cognitive psychology. Prerequisites: PSYC 2013, 2023 and 2263, or permission of the instructor.

4147PSYC.4323.A
Seminar in Romantic Relation.
Perunovic, MihailoT TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course focuses on the lifecycle of romantic relationships from initial attraction and the development of an attachment, to growth and maintenance of the relationship, to conflict and even dissolution. A social psychology perspective will be adopted, with an emphasis on understanding the basic processes involved in interpersonal relations. Classes will be heavily oriented toward discussing, presenting, and evaluating research in the field. Prerequisites: PSYC 2413 and PSYC 2023.

4148PSYC.4423.A
Seminar in Social Psychology
Higgins, NancyT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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Exploration of theoretical and empirical work in one or more areas of social psychology. Prerequisites: PSYC 2013, 2023, 2413 or permission of the instructor.

3939PSYC.4996.A2
Honours Thesis
Staff, M W F12:30PM-01:20PMTBA.TBA
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The student will conduct an individual research project with guidance from the Department. Some classes will be held to acquaint Honours candidates with problems in research design. PSYC 2013, 2023, 3933 and 3943 are prerequisites. A minimum grade of B is required in each of these courses.

4112RELG.1006.A2
Intro to Religious Studies
Simon, DerekM W F10:30AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[I. Introductory Course]A thematic, issues-oriented introduction to the study of religions. Some of the themes and issues explored may include social crisis and renewal, authority and power, sexual diversity, conflict and peace, evil and suffering, death and after death, food and music, among others. By means of these themes, students develop an active appreciation of diverse religious traditions and gain the tools to think critically about them.

4118RELG.1006.B2
Intro to Religious Studies
Bain, AlexandraT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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[I. Introductory Course]A thematic, issues-oriented introduction to the study of religions. Some of the themes and issues explored may include social crisis and renewal, authority and power, sexual diversity, conflict and peace, evil and suffering, death and after death, food and music, among others. By means of these themes, students develop an active appreciation of diverse religious traditions and gain the tools to think critically about them.

4122RELG.1006.C2
Intro to Religious Studies
George, MichaelT TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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[I. Introductory Course]A thematic, issues-oriented introduction to the study of religions. Some of the themes and issues explored may include social crisis and renewal, authority and power, sexual diversity, conflict and peace, evil and suffering, death and after death, food and music, among others. By means of these themes, students develop an active appreciation of diverse religious traditions and gain the tools to think critically about them.

4411RELG.2133.A
Religion & Ecology
Simon, DerekM W F12:30PM-01:20PMTBA.TBA
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[II. Intermediate and Advanced Courses|1. Multi-Religious Courses]Many religious traditions display a variety of stances towards the environmental crisis, ranging from indifference to reform. Through critical and comparative study, this course explores religious approaches to ecology in a variety of traditions. Topics may include environmental stewardship, deep ecology, ecoliberation, ecofeminism and ethnic indigenous ecology.

4139RELG.2223.A
Psychology of Religion
George, MichaelT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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[III. Specialized Courses|3. Multidisciplinary Courses]The examination of religious experience drawing from the classic approaches to psychology such as William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Jung, and their contemporary interpreters.

4412RELG.2233.A
Women and Religion
Bain, AlexandraT TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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[II. Intermediate and Advanced Courses|1. Multi-Religious Courses]The course aims to study how i) women in history and in modern times respond to socio-cultural restrictions and their attempts to create spiritual and social alternatives, ii) how notions of asceticism and sexuality are utilized as liberating and prescriptive modes. It will examine feminist critiques to classical, medieval, and current texts and thinkers. We will closely look at the assumptions that guide both classical texts and modern critiques.

4141RELG.3073.A
Islam I
Bain, AlexandraT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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[II. Intermediate and Advanced Courses|2. Tradition-Specific Courses]This course will introduce students to the basic beliefs and practices of global Islam, beginning with the life of the Prophet Muhammad and the revelation of the Qur'an. The course will include overviews of Islamic history, knowledge, and spirituality. Special attention will be paid to the study of Islam in its cultural contexts: Middle Eastern, African, Asian, European, and North American, among others.

4158SCWK.2033.B
Intro to Scwk Fields of Pract
Allison, Anne-DreaW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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[Undergraduate Courses]This is a survey course for all students interested in social work, curious about the relevance of arts and social science disciplines to social work fields of practice, and/or who wish to explore the profession as a potential career choice. Students will be introduced to the values, ethics, history and requirements of professional social work practice, with particular emphasis on social justice issues. Students will also have an opportunity to explore the various social work fields of practice.

4251SCWK.5006.A
Prep. for Prof. Scwk. Practice
Hotte, JenniW F09:00AM-12:00PMBMH.204
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[Post-Degree Courses]The purpose of this course is the development of personal and professional skills that prepare students for professional critical social work practice. This includes a focus on increasing self-awareness and mindfulness as important knowledge for practice; an emphasis on developing skills for experiential learning; an orientation to the values and characteristics of a competent social work professional and social work practice; and the development of beginning competency in generic crisis intervention theory and skills common to all levels of social work practice. Additionally, the course will prepare students for their initial field education experience through the clarification of expectations of students in a field placement that includes an emphasis on preparation of learning contracts.

4252SCWK.5006.B
Prep. for Prof. Scwk. Practice
Raven, StelW F09:00AM-12:00PMBMH.108
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[Post-Degree Courses]The purpose of this course is the development of personal and professional skills that prepare students for professional critical social work practice. This includes a focus on increasing self-awareness and mindfulness as important knowledge for practice; an emphasis on developing skills for experiential learning; an orientation to the values and characteristics of a competent social work professional and social work practice; and the development of beginning competency in generic crisis intervention theory and skills common to all levels of social work practice. Additionally, the course will prepare students for their initial field education experience through the clarification of expectations of students in a field placement that includes an emphasis on preparation of learning contracts.

4253SCWK.5046.A
Theory for Soc.Work Pract.II
LTA, T TH09:00AM-12:00PMBMH.204
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[Post-Degree Courses]This is a mandatory course for all post-degree BSW students. The course provides a base for professional practice by introducing the values and ethics of the profession, and theories relevant to social work practice with individuals, groups, and communities. Knowledge drawn from the social sciences and other disciplines will be integrated with methods of intervention. Prerequisites: SCWK 5036.

4254SCWK.5046.B
Theory for Soc.Work Pract.II
Weeks, MurrayT TH09:00AM-12:00PMBMH.108
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[Post-Degree Courses]This is a mandatory course for all post-degree BSW students. The course provides a base for professional practice by introducing the values and ethics of the profession, and theories relevant to social work practice with individuals, groups, and communities. Knowledge drawn from the social sciences and other disciplines will be integrated with methods of intervention. Prerequisites: SCWK 5036.

4257SCWK.5313.A
Social Policy in Can. Context
Bejan, RalucaM09:00AM-12:00PMBMH.108
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[Post-Degree Courses]Concepts in policy planning are studied, along with an examination of the process of planned change from problem identification to programming. Consideration will be given to the political arena, the bureaucracy and roles of the politician, and the public servant. Three hours per week.

4258SCWK.5313.B
Social Policy in Can. Context
Bejan, RalucaM01:30PM-04:30PMBMH.204
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[Post-Degree Courses]Concepts in policy planning are studied, along with an examination of the process of planned change from problem identification to programming. Consideration will be given to the political arena, the bureaucracy and roles of the politician, and the public servant. Three hours per week.

4255SCWK.5723.A
Child Welfare
Matthews, PeterT05:30PM-08:30PMBMH.204
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[Post-Degree Courses]This course is designed to introduce students to the child welfare system in New Brunswick and Canada, and to examine the policies, procedures, and practices which have been developed to respond to the needs of children and adolescents. As such, another purpose of the course is to critique existing policies, procedures, and practices and to discuss ways in which the child welfare delivery system could be more responsive to the needs of children and their families. Alternative responses and innovative programmes will be examined and students will be challenged to be creative in developing ideas which would lead to evolving the child welfare system in the direction of better meeting children's needs.

4256SCWK.5723.B
Child Welfare
Matthews, PeterTH05:30PM-08:30PMBMH.204
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[Post-Degree Courses]This course is designed to introduce students to the child welfare system in New Brunswick and Canada, and to examine the policies, procedures, and practices which have been developed to respond to the needs of children and adolescents. As such, another purpose of the course is to critique existing policies, procedures, and practices and to discuss ways in which the child welfare delivery system could be more responsive to the needs of children and their families. Alternative responses and innovative programmes will be examined and students will be challenged to be creative in developing ideas which would lead to evolving the child welfare system in the direction of better meeting children's needs.

3772SOCI.1006.A2
Introduction to Sociology
Fredericks, ErinM W F11:30AM-12:20PMTBA.TBA
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

3774SOCI.1006.B2
Introduction to Sociology
Hersey, CorinneT TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

3776SOCI.1006.C2
Introduction to Sociology
Hayes, MatthewT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

3778SOCI.1006.D2
Introduction to Sociology
McCoy, RobertM W F10:30AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

3780SOCI.1006.E2
Introduction to Sociology
McCoy, RobertM W F01:30PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

3782SOCI.1006.F2
Introduction to Sociology
Caliskan, GulhanimT TH08:30AM-09:50AMTBA.TBA
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

3820SOCI.2013.B
Research Design & Method
Baker, KellyT TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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An introduction to the main research approaches used in sociology. The course includes practical experience in developing a research program by considering research question development, research design, methods of data collection, research ethics and data analysis. Of particular interest are the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches.

3822SOCI.2023.A
Understanding Statistics
Staff, T TH01:00PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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Statistics are used and misused by social scientists, policy makers, and the media to describe the social world. Sociologists use statistics to understand social inequality and examine relations of power. In this course you examine the use and meaning of statistics in sociology, social policy and popular media to increase your ability to differentiate dodgy statistics from valid evidence. Note: To fulfill requirements for the Minor, Major or Honours in sociology, students may take this course or any other statistics course.

3791SOCI.2106.A2
Canadian Society
Staff, T TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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The purpose of this course is to give the student an understanding of the operation and functioning of the society in which we live. The configuration of Canadian institutions is analyzed in terms of their historical patterns of development.

3824SOCI.2313.B
Deviance
Hersey, CorinneT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course reviews theory and research with a focus on the social basis of deviance, deviance construction, and the consequences of social reactions to selected forms of deviance.

3825SOCI.2323.A
Sociology for Cyborgs
Weeks, PeterM W F12:30PM-01:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course is a critical introduction to the social, political, economic, and cultural organization of the Internet. The purpose is to provide media literacy tools to penetrate beneath its commonly experienced surfaces. The focus is on who organizes the Web: its commercialization and the potential for democratization of its users. An important goal is discovering the academic Web as a resource for both Liberal Arts education and lifetime learning.

3793SOCI.2416.A2
Inequality in Society
Fleming, MichaelT TH08:30AM-09:50AMTBA.TBA
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This course explores existing patterns of social inequality and debates concerning the possibility and desirability of greater equality. Taking a theoretical and historical focus, this course examines the changing nature of inequality in contemporary Canadian society in the context of globalization. Throughout, we develop our understanding of how different forms of inequality - particularly social class, gender and race - intersect. One section of the course may have a service learning requirement, where students engage in volunteer work in the community, and then reflect upon their experiences through reading, writing, and discussion.

3827SOCI.2513.A
Sociology of Communication
Campbell, MargaretT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course considers the mass media, (principally print and electronic), its place in, and impact upon Canadian society. Various perspectives and related research are considered with respect to the control and ownership of the media, the social organization of the production of news, facts, statistics, and other messages; and the themes expressed in popular culture as conveyed by the media. Underlying concerns are the social construction of what-is-taken-to-be reality and the language that is used in the conveying of messages.

3833SOCI.2613.A
Sociology of Gender
Campbell, MargaretM W02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course focuses on particular aspects of the social processes that shape, and are shaped by female and male social roles such as gender and power, gender and social structures of work, and feminist social movements.

3835SOCI.3023.A
Contemporary Soci. Theory
Kelly, ColmT TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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A study of contemporary developments in sociological theory, focusing on major trends, their interrelationships, and controversies. Prerequisite: SOCI 2033.

3841SOCI.3123.A
Social Move.,Activism &Change
Hersey, CorinneT TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course explores conceptual, theoretical and methodological understandings of social movements and activism as an organized way of effecting social change. It also examines a series of historical and contemporary case studies within Canadian and global contexts. Students analyze social movements or activism for social change in their local and/or global communities.

3847SOCI.3183.A
Sociology,the Self &the Other
Kelly, ColmW02:30PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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George Herbert Mead, one of the earliest sociologists, argued that our relationship to others comes before, and creates, the self. We examine and extend this idea by discussing what the terms like the the general other,otherness and the relation to the other, might mean. Amongst the thinkers and schools of thought examined are Mead and symbolic interactionism, Alfred Schutz and phenomenological sociology, Erving Goffman, the school of ethnomethodology and conversation analysis, and Jean-Luc Nancy, Jacques Derrida and the school of deconstruction. A number of feature films illustrating the themes of the course will be viewed. Students are encouraged to discuss popular culture and their own experiences in light of the themes of the course.

3849SOCI.3293.A
Animals & Society
Kelly, ColmT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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In Sociology we study human society. Humans, however, have always lived in relation to other non-human animals, and these relations and these animals have in fact been central to human society. In this course we will re-think what we mean by 'human society,' by showing how integral animals have always been to what we take to be 'human society.'

3852SOCI.3583.A
Research for Social Change
Caliskan, GulhanimM02:30PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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This seminar course encourages students to explore how research can inform social justice and social change. Examining specific debates from the fields of feminist research, Indigenous methodologies, and critical race theory, students will gain new understandings in the various ways research can both reproduce and challenge operations of power and privilege. This course offers students the opportunity to engage in debates around these methodologies as they consider how to do research for social change.

3855SOCI.3663.A
Queer Sociology
Fredericks, ErinW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course explores the social construction of queerness in heteronormative societies. Students apply sociological concepts and theories to the study of queer identities, communities, and sexual practices. They examine social and political responses to queerness, and the ways in which these responses shape the lives of queer people. Prerequisite: SOCI 1006 and 6 credit hours of sociology at the 2nd-year level.

3858SOCI.4013.C
Senior Seminar
Hayes, MatthewT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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The senior seminar is a one-semester course, required for a Major degree in sociology, which is to be taken in the final year of study. The course is organized around substantive issues, with different sections devoted to different topics. The issues are addressed as puzzles or lines of inquiry that explore current concerns. Students are expected to bring the knowledge they have acquired of the competing traditions of sociological inquiry to bear on the theme. This course will be conducted as a seminar, with students taking responsibility for researching, presenting, and discussing material. Regular attendance and active participation will be emphasized. Enrolment limited to approximately 15 students in each section.

4179SPAN.1006.A2
Beginning Spanish
Basabe, OmarM W F12:30PM-01:20PMTBA.TBA
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The beginner's course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of the language. It represents the basic level in the learning of Spanish. Teaching methods and texts will vary from year to year and from instructor to instructor. The aims of the course are the acquisition of (1) listening comprehension, (2) basic vocabulary suitable for everyday conversations, (3) simple grammatical structures, and (4) a knowledge of reading and writing techniques. The basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) are emphasized. In addition, each instructor will introduce the students to selected elements of Hispanic Culture.

4181SPAN.1006.B2
Beginning Spanish
Terzioska, JasminaM W F01:30PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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The beginner's course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of the language. It represents the basic level in the learning of Spanish. Teaching methods and texts will vary from year to year and from instructor to instructor. The aims of the course are the acquisition of (1) listening comprehension, (2) basic vocabulary suitable for everyday conversations, (3) simple grammatical structures, and (4) a knowledge of reading and writing techniques. The basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) are emphasized. In addition, each instructor will introduce the students to selected elements of Hispanic Culture.

4183SPAN.1006.C2
Beginning Spanish
Sainz, HaydeeM W F11:30AM-12:20PMTBA.TBA
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The beginner's course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of the language. It represents the basic level in the learning of Spanish. Teaching methods and texts will vary from year to year and from instructor to instructor. The aims of the course are the acquisition of (1) listening comprehension, (2) basic vocabulary suitable for everyday conversations, (3) simple grammatical structures, and (4) a knowledge of reading and writing techniques. The basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) are emphasized. In addition, each instructor will introduce the students to selected elements of Hispanic Culture.

4185SPAN.1006.D2
Beginning Spanish
Sainz, HaydeeM W F10:30AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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The beginner's course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of the language. It represents the basic level in the learning of Spanish. Teaching methods and texts will vary from year to year and from instructor to instructor. The aims of the course are the acquisition of (1) listening comprehension, (2) basic vocabulary suitable for everyday conversations, (3) simple grammatical structures, and (4) a knowledge of reading and writing techniques. The basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) are emphasized. In addition, each instructor will introduce the students to selected elements of Hispanic Culture.

4208SPAN.2023.A
Intermediate Spanish II
Babineau, Mary LouM W F10:30AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course is the continuation of Intermediate Grammar I or its equivalent. It begins with a review of the indicative mood and then moves on to coverage of the subjunctive mood. This course will stress conversation, oral exercises, and oral presentations. Written assignments will improve the accuracy of the grammatical structures learned in the oral part of the course. Plays will sometimes be used as a part of the learning language process.

4209SPAN.2123.A
Cult. & Comp. 2: Span. America
Babineau, Mary LouT TH02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course follows on from SPAN 2113 and continues the cultural study methods that were introduced in first term. Emphasis is again placed on reading and writing assignments. Written Spanish is developed through cultural readings drawn from selected Latin American texts. The course contains a basic research component and students will be encouraged to select and develop their own research interests.

4210SPAN.3323.A
Adv. Reading 2: Spanish Americ
Sainz, HaydeeM W02:30PM-03:50PMTBA.TBA
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Students will develop their reading and analyses skills by on in-depth reading of selected Latin American texts and in addition, they will improve their oral fluency studying the rhythms of Latin American poetry. Oral and written expositions on specific topics which arise from their textual analyses will reinforce the accuracy of the use of Spanish language in all its forms.

4211SPAN.3523.A
Advanced Grammar II
Basabe, OmarW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course is a continuation of Advanced Grammar I. As in the first course, this one also aims to build on the knowledge and communicative skills that students have previously acquired with regards to the subjunctive tense. During the course of the semester, in-class activities will emphasize the practice of the past subjunctive tenses. Some structural exercises and reading activities will be used; however, the course is based on communicative activities and projects that will reinforce grammar acquisition.

4212SPAN.4043.A
Panorama 4:20th C Spanish Lit
Terzioska, JasminaM04:00PM-06:50PMTBA.TBA
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This course will examine the evolution of Spanish Culture and Texts in five stages: (1) the generation of 1898; (2) The Generation of 1927; (3) the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939); (4) the dictatorship (1939-1975); and (5) the makings of modern Spain (1975-date). The course will contain a research component and students will be expected to select and research specific topics.

4213SPAN.4923.A
Collective Memory
Basabe, OmarM W F11:30AM-12:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course will explore the connections between collective memory, history and culture in Argentina. It explores the cultural production of the post-dictatorship Process of National Reorganization (1976-1983) through essays, fiction, and film. These texts and films reconstruct not only history but also those identities denied by official history. We will define concepts such as official history, Other History, and collective memory in order to understand the discursive fields from which history and memory are reconstructed.

4092STS.1003.B
Science, Tech., and Society I
Wisniewski, AngelaM W F11:30AM-12:20PMTBA.TBA
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Science and technology are among the most powerful forces in our world today and come with a vast and complicated array of social, ethical, political, legal, and economic implications. This course introduces students to the core theories and various branches of the dynamic field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) in order to facilitate thoughtful analysis of the intertwined relations among science, technology, and society.

4089STS.1513.A
Principles of Biology II
Langmaid, WilfredT TH04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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[I. Science Courses]This course examines mitosis, meiosis, and genetics. Surveys the structure, function, and evolution of the kingdoms of life. Discusses the basics of ecology, culminating in ecological interactions and the impact of humans on the planet.

4094STS.2253.A
Science & Tech. From 1543
Jenkins, JaneT TH08:30AM-09:50AMTBA.TBA
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Examines the transformation of civilizations around the world by technologies such as steam engines, electricity, airplanes, and nuclear bombs. Also examines the development and impact of new scientific theories of universal gravitation, evolution, genetics, and bio-engineering. Aims to understand the social, political, economic, and religious consequences of science and technology from the mid-16th century to the present.

4097STS.2403.A
Science, Technology and War
Brown, CynthiaM W F01:30PM-02:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course explores the development of modern techniques, technologies, and social systems for the purposes of making war. It also asks how wars change societies, technologically, socially, and structurally. We will pay attention to technology and changes in military strategy, but we will also look at non-combatants as users of technology. Credit cannot be obtained for both STS 1403 and STS 2403.

4099STS.2503.A
Plagues and Peoples
Jenkins, JaneM W04:00PM-05:20PMTBA.TBA
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This course studies the impact of disease epidemics on human populations and on economic, social, intellectual, religious, and political aspects of life from ancient times to the present.

4101STS.3013.A
Controversies in Sci.& Techno.
Wisniewski, AngelaT TH10:00AM-11:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course explores controversial issues involving science and technology in order to investigate the underlying dynamics of science and technology themselves since it is during controversies that the normally hidden social dimensions of techno-science become more explicit. Various controversies, such as climate change, transgenic foods, biofuels, and chemical additives in food are studied to reveal the rhetorical tools, underlying assumptions, and social, political, economic, and philosophical struggles embedded within science and technology. Pre-requisite: STS 1003.

4103STS.3103.A
Science, Tech & Society III
Wisniewski, AngelaW F09:00AM-10:20AMTBA.TBA
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This course further develops an integrative understanding of the core theories and various branches of the dynamic field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) through an advanced study of the theoretical roots and current trends in the discipline. Students will develop skills in critical thinking, research, as well as written and oral presentations by applying theoretical perspectives to different case studies. Perequisite: STS 2103.

4105STS.3413.A
God, Nature, & Charles Darwin
Jenkins, JaneT TH11:30AM-12:50PMTBA.TBA
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Examines the complex interactions between theories of biological evolution and Christianity. Beginning with ancient Greek theories of how species arise, the course will focus primarily on the social, political, economic, techno-scientific, and religion contexts of the 19th century when ideas of species transmutation or evolution were discussed. Pre-requisite: a minimum of 9 credit hours beyond the 1000-level.

Last Published: Sat Jul 21 06:15:03 2018