Semester 2 Course Offerings

Generated: Sat Dec 16 06:00:26 2017

SYNCourseInstrDaysTimeLoc
3091ANTH.1013.D
Intro to Cultural Anthropology
Hutton, KarenT TH08:30AM-09:50AMECH.103
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This is an introduction to the study of contemporary cultures and languages and to the methods of ethnographic fieldwork.

2463ANTH.1013.E
Intro to Cultural Anthropology
Dallos, CsillaM W F12:30PM-01:20PMJDH.G5
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This is an introduction to the study of contemporary cultures and languages and to the methods of ethnographic fieldwork.

2465ANTH.1013.F
Intro to Cultural Anthropology
Toner, PeterT TH01:00PM-02:20PMECH.103
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This is an introduction to the study of contemporary cultures and languages and to the methods of ethnographic fieldwork.

2466ANTH.1023.B
Intro to Physical Anthr.
McLaughlin, MoiraT TH08:30AM-09:50AMECH.120
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An introduction to the study of humans as a biocultural species. The focus of this course is on human evolution, human variation and genetics, nonhuman primates, and the work of physical anthropologists.

2468ANTH.2013.A
Area Ethnography: South Amer.
Mora, SantiagoM W F10:30AM-11:20AMECH.G11
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Ethnographic and ethnological study of the culture of South America. Prerequisite: ANTH 1013.

2471ANTH.2423.A
Human Evolution:fact & Theory
McLaughlin, MoiraT TH11:30AM-12:20PMECH.120
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This course is a study of the current knowledge and scientific debate regarding the origins and development of the human species. Fossil evidence and evolutionary theory from a historical and modern perspective are emphasized. Not open to first-year students.

2472ANTH.2443.A
Human Skeletal Biology
McLaughlin, MoiraT TH02:30PM-03:50PMECH.120
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The focus of this course is the anatomy of the skeletal and skeletal muscular systems of the body. Students will learn the details of both the human and nonhuman skeleton in a concentrated lab format. Not open to first-year students.

2473ANTH.2523.A
Social Anthropology
Toner, PeterT TH10:00AM-11:20AMGMH.205
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This course investigates social forms such as kinship, marriage, descent, age groupings, and interest associations, as well as processes of stratification, change, and social control in society. Ethnographic examples are used to illustrate how social aspects of economy, political order, religion, and language constitute social systems. Prerequisite: ANTH 1013.

2474ANTH.3463.A
Psychological Anthropology
Dallos, CsillaM W F10:30AM-11:20AMECH.124
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This course introduces students to psychological anthropology, a major sub-field of cultural anthropology. Though similar to cultural and cross-cultural psychology in that it studies how thought, emotion, and experience relate to social and cultural processes, psychological anthropology is distinct from these fields in psychology in its emphasis on the ethnographic method. Though prior basic familiarity with cultural anthropology is an asset, no other previous knowledge is necessary in order to succeed in this course.

2475ANTH.3663.A
Urban Anthropology
Votour, BradleyM W F11:30AM-12:20PMGMH.301
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This course emphasizes a cross-cultural approach to the characteristics of urban society. Major themes of the course include the processes and patterns of urbanization in developing and developed countries, and theories of rural-urban migration. The effects of urbanization on work, family, sense of community, housing, health, education, and recreation will also be examined. Anthropological research methods such as holism and participant observation will be examined and students will have an opportunity to be involved in urban ethnographic research projects. Prerequisite: None.

3119ANTH.3683.A
The Anthropology of Sports
Proulx, CraigT TH01:00PM-02:20PMECH.124
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This course examines the role of sport cross- culturally in both Western and non-Western societies. It will focus on the role of sport in politics, religion, economics and mass media, surveying such issues as socialization, the social construction of identity, class, gender, ethnicity, ideology, power, representation and ritual. These issues will be addressed through in-class activity and fieldwork involving sporting events. Prerequisite: None.

2431ANTH.3806.A2
Readings in Anth. Theory
Mora, SantiagoM W F12:30PM-01:20PMECH.124
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This course is an intensive reading and seminar discussion on selected recent anthropological theories. Students will read and analyze original works from the second half of the 20th century to the present in an attempt to evaluate their explanatory value and their consequences in the development of anthropology as an academic discipline. Prerequisite: ANTH 1013 and one area ethnography course. Anthropology majors must take this course in their third year of study.

2477ANTH.4003.A
Issues in Anthropology
Toner, PeterW F09:00AM-10:20AMECH.320
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This is an advanced course in anthropological theory which focuses on an issue or set of issues that are of particular concern in anthropology today. The course will be oriented around intensive reading and discussion of theoretical materials drawn from anthropology and allied disciplines. Possible issues include the dialectic between structure and agency, the commensurability and translation of cultures, power and knowledge, and the writing of ethnographic texts,among others. Honours students may be required to fulfill separate course requirements from majors. Prerequisite: Prerequisites: ANTH 3806 and ANTH 3913. Anthropology majors must take this course in their final year of study. Register with permission by instructor.

2479ANTH.4453.A
Sp.Topics: Queer Anthropology
Votour, BradleyT TH04:00PM-05:20PMJDH.205
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This course will introduce students to the changing disciplinary trends in the anthropological study of gender and sexuality. We will evaluate the use of queer as a concept and as a method in queer anthropology and explore the relationship between a queer anthropological perspective and other, often marginalized traditions in anthropology. Students will critically analyze what queer anthropological perspectives, methods, and forms of knowledge teach us about the practice/field of anthropology more broadly. Prerequisite: completion of any introductory social science course or permission of the instructor.

2917AQGB.EN1006.A2
Introduction to Literature
Wilkie, RodgerT TH02:30PM-03:50PMHCH.5
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An introduction to the range and variety of literature in English, to the practice of critical reading, and to writing about ideas and texts in conventional academic language and forms. The course concentrates on the central genres of literature.

2919AQGB.PH1006.A2
Intro to Western Philosophy
Hall, AlanT TH01:00PM-02:20PMHCH.5
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An introduction, through lecture, reading of original sources, and discussion, to the origins and development of western philosophy. The first part of the course studies this tradition from its beginnings in ancient Greece through the Christian Middle Ages. Authors read include Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, and St. Thomas Aquinas. Themes include the nature of reality, the nature of human being and human knowledge; moral and political philosophy; the existence and nature of God. The latter part of the course continues the survey of developments in western philosophy, from the early modern period to contemporary discussion. The focus is on rationalism, empiricism, idealism, and the reactions these provoked.

2944AQGH.EN1006.A2
Intro to Literature
Ball, HilaryT TH10:00AM-11:20AMMMH.202
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Intro to Literature

2946AQGH.HR1006.A2
Intro to Human Rights
Dinan, MatthewT TH01:00PM-02:20PMMMH.202
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Intro to Human Rights

2949AQGH.PO1006.A2
Intro to Political Science
Kinney, RossT TH02:30PM-03:50PMMMH.202
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Intro to Political Science

3050BIOL.1513.A
Principles of Biology II
Langmaid, WilfredT TH04:00PM-05:20PMBMH.102
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[IV. Scientific and Mathematical]This course examines mitosis, meiosis, and genetics. Surveys the structure, function, and evolution of the kingdoms of life. Discusses the basics of ecology, culminating in ecological interactions and the impact of humans on the planet.

2576BUSI.2013.B
Introduction to Business
Critchley, KenM W04:00PM-05:20PMMMH.202
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The course introduces a range of business topics with an emphasis on business practices in the Canadian context. Topics include entrepreneurship, financial process, marketing, socially responsible business, management, human resources, and the role of business in the Canadian economy. In addition, broader issues, such as business ethics and relations between employees and employers will be discussed.

2577BUSI.3023.A
Nonprofit Management
Critchley, KenT TH04:00PM-05:20PMECH.103
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The course introduces students to the specific issues that arise in managing nonprofit organizations. Topics covered include strategic planning, accountability, board governance, financial planning, fund raising, and human resources.

2533CATH.2003.A
Intro to Catholic Studies
Dinan, MatthewM W F11:30AM-12:20PMMMH.202
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An introduction to the Catholic tradition through a consideration of what it means to be Catholic, and how this experience has been expressed historically and culturally in philosophy, theology, prayer, literature, personal and social morality, and art.

2583COPP.1023.A
Intro. to Policy Studies
Gillies, JamesT TH10:00AM-11:20AMMMH.308
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]This course introduces students to the policy making process, how policies are researched, drafted, legislated, and communicated. The course will also explore how non-governmental organizations, citizens groups and corporations influence public policy decisions. This course will prepare students to choose a Focus Area to complete their COPP Major.

2584COPP.1023.B
Intro. to Policy Studies
Harvey, JaniceW F09:00AM-10:20AMMMH.308
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]This course introduces students to the policy making process, how policies are researched, drafted, legislated, and communicated. The course will also explore how non-governmental organizations, citizens groups and corporations influence public policy decisions. This course will prepare students to choose a Focus Area to complete their COPP Major.

2585COPP.2013.B
Fundamentals of Writing
Tunney, MarkT TH11:30AM-12:50PMGMH.204
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]Communicating public policy requires clear and effective writing at every stage in the process. This is a foundational writing course that will help students learn to express themselves in clear, compelling language. Prerequisites: COPP 1013, COPP 1023.

2586COPP.2033.A
Research Methods
MacLean, Heather-AnneM07:00PM-09:50PMMMH.308
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]This course will introduce students to the methods for gathering and analyzing data through interviews, surveys, focus groups, content analysis, and polls and how this information can be applied to public policy initiatives and planning an accompanying communications strategy. Prerequisite: COPP 2013.

2587COPP.3013.A
Rhetoric
Camp, MichaelT TH04:00PM-05:20PMMMH.308
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]This course builds on the skills developed in the Fundamentals of Writing course and applies them to rhetoric, speech writing and debating. Students will read ancient and modern speeches, historical writings on rhetoric and explore the influence of persuasive writing on public affairs. Prerequisites: COPP 2013, COPP 2023, COPP 2033.

2588COPP.3033.A
Public Policy and the Media
McHardie, DanielM W04:00PM-05:20PMMMH.307
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]This course will explore how public policies are reported in various forms of media and how communications planning can influence the success or failure of these initiatives. The course will examine communications planning and media relations strategies such as proactive and reactive methods of representing an organization in the media. Prerequisites: COPP 2013, COPP 2023, COPP 2033.

2589COPP.4006.A2
Case Studies in Public Policy
Gillies, JamesT02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.307
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]The capstone case study course will require students to spend the fall semester surveying scholarly literature on public policy analysis (regarding policy development, design and implementation) and the winter semester applying this research as they write two case studies that will require students to synthesize the issues encountered in their Focus Areas with their studies in Communications. Course work can be presented in English and French. Prerequisites: COPP 3013, COPP 3023, COPP 3033.

2527COPP.4016.A2
Internship
Dickson, DonaldTH07:00PM-09:50PMCBC.CBC
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[2. Communications and Public Policy]Students will complete two supervised professional unpaid internships in a professional communications agency, non-profit organization, or government office and will complete a detailed exit report. Where possible, students will have the opportunity to pursue internships that require them to work in French or in a bilingual office. Prerequisites: COPP 3013, COPP 3023, COPP 3033.

2538CRIM.1013.C
Introduction to Criminology
Sauvageau, JeanM W04:00PM-05:20PMBMH.102
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the discipline of criminology: its origins, the nature of disciplinary debates, and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves an examination of crime patterns, causes of criminal behaviour and crime prevention strategies. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upper-level courses.

2539CRIM.1013.D
Introduction to Criminology
Sauvageau, JeanT TH08:30AM-09:50AMBMH.102
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the discipline of criminology: its origins, the nature of disciplinary debates, and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves an examination of crime patterns, causes of criminal behaviour and crime prevention strategies. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upper-level courses.

2541CRIM.1013.E
Introduction to Criminology
Thomas, BrendaT TH08:30AM-09:50AMMMH.308
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the discipline of criminology: its origins, the nature of disciplinary debates, and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves an examination of crime patterns, causes of criminal behaviour and crime prevention strategies. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upper-level courses.

2543CRIM.1013.F
Introduction to Criminology
Sanford, StephanieM07:00PM-09:50PMMMH.203
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the discipline of criminology: its origins, the nature of disciplinary debates, and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves an examination of crime patterns, causes of criminal behaviour and crime prevention strategies. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upper-level courses.

2560CRIM.1013.G
Introduction to Criminology
Pidwysocky, StephenM W F01:30PM-02:20PMBMH.101
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the discipline of criminology: its origins, the nature of disciplinary debates, and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves an examination of crime patterns, causes of criminal behaviour and crime prevention strategies. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upper-level courses.

2534CRIM.1023.F
Intro. to Criminal Justice
Clifford, JamesW04:00PM-06:50PMGMH.304
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the role criminology plays in both formulating and critiquing criminal justice policy and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves a critical look at the nature of the criminal justice system, the role of the state and the creation of policies through the passing of bills, legislation, and statutes pertinent to the interpretation of the Criminal Code. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upperlevel courses.

2544CRIM.1023.G
Intro. to Criminal Justice
Sanford, StephanieTH07:00PM-09:50PMMMH.203
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This course is designed to introduce the student to the role criminology plays in both formulating and critiquing criminal justice policy and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves a critical look at the nature of the criminal justice system, the role of the state and the creation of policies through the passing of bills, legislation, and statutes pertinent to the interpretation of the Criminal Code. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upperlevel courses.

2554CRIM.2013.A
Early Criminological Theory
Pidwysocky, StephenM W F11:30AM-12:20PMBMH.101
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This course will be a survey course of classical theories in criminology. Classical theories will include the influences of work by early criminologists such as Bentham, Beccaria, Lombroso, Quetelet, and Durkheim in the development of theory and the history of theories of punishment. This course will build on the historical roots of crime and criminological theory in pre-20th century criminological theory. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2542CRIM.2113.B
Quantitative Research Methods
Goggin, ClaireT TH01:00PM-02:20PMBMH.103
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This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to social science research methods and statistics as they apply to criminology and criminal justice issues. It aims to help students understand the fundamentals of the scientific method, including research design, sampling methodologies, measurement strategies, statistics, and data collection techniques, while assisting them in the development of the necessary critical thinking skills to critique and evaluate criminal justice research. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2562CRIM.2123.B
Criminal Law
Savarese, JosephineW F09:00AM-10:20AMBMH.103
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This course provides an introduction to criminal law - what it is, how it came into being, and the various elements of offences and forms of defence within Canada's criminal law system. Possible topics include: sources of criminal law in Canada; duty to act; voluntariness; negligent homicide; causation; strict and absolute liability; attempts; and a variety of criminal defences, including mental disorder, mistake of fact, consent, provocation, and necessity. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2563CRIM.2223.B
Youth Justice
Reid, SusanT TH11:30AM-12:50PMBMH.103
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This course will examine theories of juvenile delinquency in historical and contemporary perspectives. A review of Canadian legislation concerning young offenders will be done to illuminate the official response to juvenile delinquency in light of the theories noted above. Special attention will be given to the Young Offenders Act, juvenile justice in Canada, the disposition of young offenders, and the rights of young adults. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2535CRIM.2233.A
Police & the Cdn. Community
Fleming, MichaelT TH01:00PM-02:20PMBMH.101
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This course is designed to examine the social and political role of the police and police practices in the contemporary Canadian society. The topics that will be discussed include the functions and objectives of modern policing, police discretion, police powers, and structures of accountability. Particular attention will be given to an examination of the context of police - community relations and crime prevention initiatives. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2557CRIM.2263.A
Children and Youth At Risk
Staff, T TH02:30PM-03:50PMBMH.102
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This course will provide an analysis of the concept of at-risk children and youth from a theoretical and practical application. Considering the question of risk from an ecological framework as well as a constructionist perspective, individual and social factors which have an impact on children's and youth ability to cope with threats to their development will be critically evaluated. The literature on resilience in the context of both individual and social justice paradigms will also provide students an opportunity to consider various interventions designed to promote healthy development. Topics may include: youth homelessness, children of incarcerated parents, the impact of poverty on children and families, school drop outs, substance abuse, sport and leisure as crime prevention, bullying. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2524CRIM.2463.A
Cultural Criminology
McCormick, ChristopherM W F10:30AM-11:20AMBMH.103
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Cultural criminology places deviance and control in the context of culture. Through ethnography and cultural analysis, deviance and control are viewed as cultural products -- creative constructs to be read in terms of the meanings and emotions they embody. Students are challenged to question normative boundaries, and how cultural space is appropriated by power and challenged by transgression. Topics include modern anxiety, visual signifiers and emotion, found in such forms as graffiti, drug subcultures, base-jumping, street-racing or dumpster diving. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2525CRIM.3103.A
Advanced Qual.Research Methods
Clarke, DawneT TH01:00PM-02:20PMMMH.307
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This course seeks to deepen students' understanding of qualitative research methods, such as research ethics in qualitative research, qualitative research design, interviewing, focus group interviews, participant observation and qualitative content analysis. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2566CRIM.3123.A
Contemp Issues in Crim Justice
Reid, SusanW02:30PM-05:20PMBMH.103
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This course is designed to provide an overview and analysis of contemporary controversies and issues pertinent to the criminal justice system and Canadian crime policy. Specific emphasis will be given to an examination of the influence that changes in social policy and shifting public sentiments about crime control have on both the structure and operation of various components of the criminal justice system. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2546CRIM.3153.A
Criminal Behaviour
Goggin, ClaireT TH08:30AM-09:50AMBMH.103
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This course examines the antecedents of, and responses to, criminal behaviour in the context of evidence-based practices in the assessment and treatment of at-risk and diverse offender populations within community and institutional contexts. Topics may include: offender risk assessment practices, major correlates of crime, effective correctional programming, best practices in the prediction and treatment of anti-social behaviour, and an understanding of the role of sound empirical strategies in contributing to what works in addressing criminal behaviour. Prerequisite: CRIM 2243: Corrections.

2569CRIM.3223.A
Criminal Procedure
Lewis, KatherineM W04:00PM-05:20PMMMH.203
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This course provides an overview of the organizational structure and functions of the court system in Canada. The theory and practice of bail, legal representation, prosecution, the trial, sentencing, and the appeal process will be covered. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2570CRIM.3243.A
Advanced Criminal Law
O'Regan, KarlaM W02:30PM-03:50PMMMH.308
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This course builds upon the introduction to criminal law offered in CRIM 2123: Criminal Law, focusing on some of the more complex aspects of Canada's criminal legal system, including examinations of modes of participation in criminal offending as well as various available defences to criminal charges. Topics may include: aiding and abetting, conspiracy, self-defence, intoxication, entrapment, duress, mistake, and consent. There will also be some comparative analyses of international crimes such as genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity, torture, and terrorism. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013, 1023 and CRIM 2123.

2571CRIM.3253.A
Pre-Honours Workshop
O'Regan, KarlaTH02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.106
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The goal of this course is the completion of an Honours thesis proposal to be included as part of the Honours application. Topics to be covered include: writing a research question, research methodology and measurement, selecting and using an adequate theory, and writing and submitting a proposal. Completion of this course does not ensure admission into the Honours program. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and CRIM 1023, CRIM 2103, CRIM 2113, CRIM 2013, CRIM 3103.

2551CRIM.3513.A
Organized Crime
Sauvageau, JeanT TH02:30PM-03:50PMBMH.103
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This course is designed to provide a critical look at the phenomenon of organized crime. The appearance of organized crime in place and time, its various definitions, and the forms it takes, such as Mafias, triads, posses, cartels, and biker gangs, will be examined. Organized crime will be situated in the larger socio-cultural context where its institutional assessment and media portrayal will be analyzed. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2528CRIM.3563.A
Visual Criminology
McCormick, ChristopherM W F11:30AM-12:20PMBMH.103
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This course is a pantheonic study of how visuals are used in research, media, evidentiarism, teaching, and artistic representations of crime. Visual technologies study forensic evidence, examine photographs for identification and images for content, and are used to record criminal events. The course re/collects visual data for analysis using visual teaching technologies to create a critical reflection on lived experience. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2532CRIM.3643.B
Terrorism: An Introduction
Clifford, JamesT07:00PM-09:50PMMMH.203
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This course provides a survey of issues related to terrorism and global conflict wherein students will be able to discuss social, political, economic and cultural roots of terrorism. In particular, this course will develop an appreciation of the complex motivations producing terrorism, as well as the unusual character and significant trade-offs that are induced by governments to minimize the impact of terrorism. Prerequisites: CRIM 1013 and 1023.

2486CRIM.4006.A2
Honours Research Seminar
Clarke, DawneT TH02:30PM-03:50PMGMH.204
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This course provides a collaborative work forum for those students who have been formally accepted into the Honours Programme. The course has two components. The first is a series of special topics taught by faculty on such issues as professional ethics, special topics in theory and methods, writing a research report, and passing ethics review. In addition, a number of thesis related assignments will guide the student through the research process: preparing a formal bibliography, research proposal with research design, and a peer presentation on their proposed research. Prerequisite: CRIM 2253 and formal acceptance into the Honours program.

2553CRIM.4133.A
Intern. & Comp. Crim Justice
Savarese, JosephineW04:00PM-06:50PMMMH.201
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This seminar course compares criminal justice systems in a variety of jurisdictions and examines the development of international criminal law. The course is designed to provide students with a better understanding of the different legal and institutional approaches to crime. Topics include an analysis of reactions to crime, criminal behaviour, correctional philosophies, and the role of international legal bodies in the area of extraordinary criminal offences. Prerequisites: A minimum of 75 credit hours, which includes CRIM 1013 and 1023, or permission of the instructor.

2573CRIM.4143.A
Hate Crime
Pidwysocky, StephenT TH10:00AM-11:20AMMMH.106
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This course will encourage students to critically evaluate social and legal positions and theories about hate crime, including research on victimization and offences. Possible topics include how hate crime is conceptualized, the organization and impact of hate movements, victim resistance, and social activism. Prerequisite: A minimum of 75 credit hours, which includes CRIM 1013 and 1023, or permission of the instructor.

2537CRJS.3103.A
Integrative Sem I:Crim Justice
Clifford, JamesM07:00PM-09:50PMBMH.102
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This course is designed as an opportunity for students in the BAA (Criminal Justice) to engage in debate, dialogue, and critical analysis. To this end, students in the course will be required to critically evaluate contrasting views, alternative arguments, and policy issues with respect to the various sectors in the criminal justice system. The police, courts, corrections, community agencies, and other non-governmental organizations affiliated with the criminal justice system will form the broad framework for analysis, debate and reflection.

2441ECON.1013.C
Intro to Economics (Micro)
Secord, AndrewM W F11:30AM-12:20PMECH.103
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[1. Economics Courses]This course, which is equivalent to one half of ECON 1006, examines the behaviour of consumers and producers in a market economy. Among the issues discussed will be environmental protection, wealth and poverty, and the extent of corporate power.(Credit will not be given for both ECON 1006 and ECON 1013.)

2447ECON.1023.B
Intro to Economics (Macro)
Solati, FaribaM W F01:30PM-02:20PMECH.103
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[1. Economics Courses]This course, which is equivalent to one half of ECON 1006, analyzes the Canadian economy and how it works. It includes a discussion of output, unemployment, growth, money, international trade, and finance. (Credit will not be given for both ECON 1006 and ECON 1023.)

2450ECON.1023.C
Intro to Economics (Macro)
Solati, FaribaT TH02:30PM-03:50PMECH.103
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[1. Economics Courses]This course, which is equivalent to one half of ECON 1006, analyzes the Canadian economy and how it works. It includes a discussion of output, unemployment, growth, money, international trade, and finance. (Credit will not be given for both ECON 1006 and ECON 1023.)

2461ECON.2113.A
Macroeconomic Theory I
Solati, FaribaM W F10:30AM-11:20AMMMH.307
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[1. Economics Courses]A theory course which develops an understanding of the basic techniques of macroeconomic analysis. Elements of the course include aggregate supply, aggregate demand, and the role of money, interest rates, and the price level. The nature of economic growth, business cycles, and the conditions for economic stability are examined.

2464ECON.2223.A
Political Economy of Women
Solati, FaribaT TH11:30AM-12:50PMGMH.304
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[1. Economics Courses]This is a seminar course examining, in depth, selected topics on the political economy of women. Potential topics include women as paid workers, domestic labour, and women and poverty.

2467ECON.3133.A
Microeconomic Theory II
Secord, AndrewM W02:30PM-03:50PMECH.223
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[1. Economics Courses]A continuation of the study of microeconomic theory. Topics will include an analysis of factor markets, technological change, partial and general equilibrium, and an analysis of the limitations of neoclassical microeconomic theory. Prerequisite: ECON 2103. It is strongly recommended that MATH 1013 & 1023 be taken prior to this course or concurrently.

2469ECON.3233.A
Marxian Economics
McFarland, JoanW F09:00AM-10:20AMGMH.205
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[1. Economics Courses]An introduction to the theory and method of Marxian economics with the reading and study of Marx's Capital, Volume I. The course will examine the basic elements of Marx's economic theories.

2470ECON.3343.A
Banking & International Financ
Gibson, KevinM W05:30PM-06:50PMMMH.202
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[1. Economics Courses]This course examines the nature and role of money, prices, interest rates, and international financial flows. It also includes an examination of the structure and activities of financial institutions in Canada and other countries.

3215EDUC.5015.A2
Field Placement
Levesque, Leo-James-TBA.TBA
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[5. Field Experience] The field placement consists of a minimum of fifteen weeks. There are four days of school visitation and two separate placements in a K-12 school setting. Placement is made by the School of Education in accordance with the policy in the St. Thomas University Calendar and the BEd Field Placement Handbook. All field placements will be conducted in the Province of New Brunswick.

3176EDUC.5113.A
Alternative Schooling Pedagog
Wood, ShaundaM W10:30AM-12:20PMBMH.205
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[4. Electives]Participants will explore a range of alternative pedagogies used to teach students in non-traditional schools including long established philosophies such as Waldorf, Montessori and current trends in addressing the learning needs of students who do not attend, have different interests/needs, or who have disengaged with traditional schooling. Topics may include International Baccalaureate, Charter, and Private schools, as well as other alternative educational settings with focus on the sociocultural dimensions of learning that underpin these contexts.

3177EDUC.5123.J
Classroom Management II
Levesque, Leo-JamesM10:30AM-12:20PMBMH.107
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[4. Electives] This module introduces pre-service teachers to some of the basic forms, processes and vocabulary used in creative movement and dance education. Readings and discussions will focus on how structured movement experiences can support and enrich learning for students at any age, in a variety of curricular disciplines.

3184EDUC.5143.A
The Professional Learning Comm
Williams, RaymondT TH08:30AM-10:20AMBMH.202
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[4. Electives] This course examines schools as learning organizations. It focuses on the philosophical and operational changes essential for the transformation of schools from the traditional bureaucratic paradigm to a learning community approach. Students will analyze case studies to determine how PLC implementation and sustainability are successfully achieved. The final assignment prepares students in the development and delivery of a workshop on professional learning communities for their peers.

3182EDUC.5153.A
Fren. Sec. Lang. Methods: Elem
Levesque, Leo-JamesM W06:30PM-08:20PMBMH.107
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[2. Middle and Secondary Majors and Electives|French Second Language] This course presents theories of second language acquisition, current trends in the field of second-language teaching and learning, and their application to the teaching of French in a communicative and interactive approach at the kindergarten to grade eight levels. Students will develop lesson units, engage in peer-teaching, and integrate technology into their teaching. Students will participate in discussion, work with case studies, research issues in second language education using current professional journals and resources. Attention will be given to developing an understanding of the importance of teaching developmentally. Students will learn about the role of age and social/psychological factors in language acquisition, the benefits of early language learning and the characteristics of the elementary school learner. This course aims at providing solid advice, information and guidance to French Second Language teachers so that they may use a wide variety of approaches and techniques designed to involve students actively in language learning and use. Students are required to have a minimum proficiency of Intermediate Plus on the New Brunswick French Oral Proficiency scale to register for this course.

3168EDUC.5413.A2
Elem.School Reading&Lang. Arts
Ingersoll, MarceaM08:30AM-10:20AMBMH.107
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[3. Elementary Majors] The course will focus on current approaches to reading and language arts instruction. This includes becoming aware of the influence of theories of reading and literacy. You will begin to lay the groundwork for your own effective language arts practice by designing and developing curriculum resources and materials for use in the classroom. You will be expected to review and utilize the New Brunswick Curriculum English Language Arts documents (found online) and your course notes and required texts in your planning and preparation of lessons and activities for this course. The spotlight is on reading and the processes of writing, listening, thinking and comprehension in the elementary classroom.

3170EDUC.5413.B2
Elem.School Reading&Lang. Arts
Ingersoll, MarceaW08:30AM-10:20AMBMH.107
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[3. Elementary Majors] The course will focus on current approaches to reading and language arts instruction. This includes becoming aware of the influence of theories of reading and literacy. You will begin to lay the groundwork for your own effective language arts practice by designing and developing curriculum resources and materials for use in the classroom. You will be expected to review and utilize the New Brunswick Curriculum English Language Arts documents (found online) and your course notes and required texts in your planning and preparation of lessons and activities for this course. The spotlight is on reading and the processes of writing, listening, thinking and comprehension in the elementary classroom.

3164EDUC.5433.A2
Elem School Math Mtds
Wood, ShaundaM01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.205
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[3. Elementary Majors] Elementary mathematics is an introduction to the context and strategies of elementary mathematics (K-8). This course does not require a strong mathematics background. The emphasis will be on content as well as on doing mathematics. Students will be encouraged to be involved in problem solving and exploring mathematical concepts by developing ideas from the concrete to the abstract level, and by developing multiple representations of mathematical ideas. Content topics include pre-number concepts, numeration and place value, whole number operations, number theory, and geometry.

3166EDUC.5433.B2
Elem School Math Mtds
Wood, ShaundaW01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.205
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[3. Elementary Majors] Elementary mathematics is an introduction to the context and strategies of elementary mathematics (K-8). This course does not require a strong mathematics background. The emphasis will be on content as well as on doing mathematics. Students will be encouraged to be involved in problem solving and exploring mathematical concepts by developing ideas from the concrete to the abstract level, and by developing multiple representations of mathematical ideas. Content topics include pre-number concepts, numeration and place value, whole number operations, number theory, and geometry.

3146EDUC.5473.A2
Science for Elem Children
Wood, ShaundaT01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.205
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[3. Elementary Majors] The nature and purpose of science education are explored. Effective use of minimal time allotted to this discipline at the elementary level is the main focus. One of the primary tasks to be undertaken is the construction of discovery-based learning centres as well as appropriate assessment tools. Students will be given the opportunity to experience the dynamics of constructivist science learning with a special emphasis to cross-curricular extensions including health. Time will be spent exploring student record keeping strategies which compliment a guided inquiry-based approach.

3148EDUC.5473.B2
Science for Elem Children
Wood, ShaundaTH01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.205
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[3. Elementary Majors] The nature and purpose of science education are explored. Effective use of minimal time allotted to this discipline at the elementary level is the main focus. One of the primary tasks to be undertaken is the construction of discovery-based learning centres as well as appropriate assessment tools. Students will be given the opportunity to experience the dynamics of constructivist science learning with a special emphasis to cross-curricular extensions including health. Time will be spent exploring student record keeping strategies which compliment a guided inquiry-based approach.

3183EDUC.5513.A
Teaching English Second Langua
Whitehouse-Sheehan, DarleneT TH08:30AM-10:20AMBMH.205
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[4. Electives] This course offers an exploration of methods and issues related to teaching English as a second language in a variety of contexts (e.g. overseas, mainstream public school instruction, courses for newcomers to Canada, intensive English programmes). It offers students a great under- standing of the structure of the English language. The major focus of the course will be current approaches to language teaching, with an emphasis on communicative, task-based, and con- tent-based methods. Attention will be also be devoted to such Social issues as learner identity and the role of the English in the world.

3187EDUC.5513.B
Teaching English Second Langua
Whitehouse-Sheehan, DarleneT TH03:30PM-05:20PMBMH.205
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[4. Electives] This course offers an exploration of methods and issues related to teaching English as a second language in a variety of contexts (e.g. overseas, mainstream public school instruction, courses for newcomers to Canada, intensive English programmes). It offers students a great under- standing of the structure of the English language. The major focus of the course will be current approaches to language teaching, with an emphasis on communicative, task-based, and con- tent-based methods. Attention will be also be devoted to such Social issues as learner identity and the role of the English in the world.

3189EDUC.5523.A
Theatre in Education
Hewson, AnneT TH06:30PM-08:20PMBMH.205
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[4. Electives] This course will introduce students to the Theatre in Education (TIE) movement and invite them to explore the use of theatre for educational purposes. Besides reading about and discussing current practices, participants will have the opportunity to produce a performance/workshop on a topic of interest for a select population. The devising will emphasize interactive theatrical strategies for generating and integrating audience input.

3155EDUC.5613.A2
Methods in Elem Soc. Stud. Ed.
Murray, SharonTH01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.107
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[3. Elementary Majors] This course focuses on investigating elementary school (K-5) social studies teaching methods. The course intends to help pre-service teachers articulate a conception of social studies education and its goals. The main areas of social studies focus are geography, history, political science, and economics and the social aspects of health education. The course design assumes that all teachers strive to engage students in meaningful experiences that bridge the study of social studies concepts with the community of learners in the classroom.

3157EDUC.5613.B2
Methods in Elem Soc. Stud. Ed.
Murray, SharonT01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.107
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[3. Elementary Majors] This course focuses on investigating elementary school (K-5) social studies teaching methods. The course intends to help pre-service teachers articulate a conception of social studies education and its goals. The main areas of social studies focus are geography, history, political science, and economics and the social aspects of health education. The course design assumes that all teachers strive to engage students in meaningful experiences that bridge the study of social studies concepts with the community of learners in the classroom.

3186EDUC.5633.A
Methods in Teaching History
Murray, SharonT TH10:30AM-12:20PMBMH.107
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[2. Middle and Secondary Majors and Electives|Social Studies] Methods and strategies of teaching history at the secondary level are the focus of the course. A strong emphasis is on awareness of the place of history teaching in the curriculum. Course participants explore and develop a variety of active learning activities. A history background or broad historical knowledge is an asset.

3178EDUC.5813.A
Secondary English Mtds
Ingersoll, MarceaM W01:30PM-03:20PMBMH.107
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[2. Middle and Secondary Majors and Electives|Language Arts] The Secondary English methods course exposes pre-service teachers to the elements that support current methods of teaching literature to middle and high school students (2011). The course text provides a framework for examining methods based on a social constructivist premise. The course will also expose pre-service teachers to recent adolescent literature. Learning outcomes in the course include: designing and participating in book club discussions, developing units of literature instruction, writing about assessment and evaluation for the secondary English classroom, understanding curriculum outcomes for secondary English lessons and other topics that we encounter during the course. Students in the course will be asked to consider what they value in literature instruction, what they believe about individual differences, how the reading abilities' of their students affects their teaching, planning and assessment. Subsequently students in the course will consider and design planning models for effective instruction.

3179EDUC.5833.A
Teaching Sec. Math & Science
Williams, GrantM W03:30PM-05:20PMBMH.205
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[2. Middle and Secondary Majors and Electives|Math and Science] Course participants will develop the content mastery and pedagogical skills necessary to facilitate engaging, inquiry-based math and science lessons for high school students. By examining various math and science education resources, developing and practicing lesson presentations, and reflecting on learning through discussion and writing, the course participants will gain a greater level of mathematics and science content knowledge and a wider array of teaching strategies for the topics in high school math and science. This course is primarily intended for Math and/or Science majors.

3185EDUC.5913.E
Measurement and Evaluation
Buggie, WilliamT TH10:30AM-12:20PMBMH.205
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[1. Core Courses|Pedagogical] This course examines the connections between achievement assessment and classroom instruction. Topics will include: major types of assessment methods, validity and reliability in assessment planning, norm and criterion referenced assessment and standardized testing.

3175EDUC.5913.S
Measurement and Evaluation
Buggie, WilliamM W08:30AM-10:20AMBMH.205
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[1. Core Courses|Pedagogical] This course examines the connections between achievement assessment and classroom instruction. Topics will include: major types of assessment methods, validity and reliability in assessment planning, norm and criterion referenced assessment and standardized testing.

3180EDUC.5953.A
Educational Psyc. I
Williams, RaymondM W03:30PM-05:20PMBMH.107
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[1. Core Courses|Pedagogical] This course explores the major theoretical principles upon which education for children and adults may be based. It also examines the notion of 'normative' characteristics of learners as well as current trends in the application of theory to classroom situations.

3188EDUC.5953.B
Educational Psyc. I
Williams, RaymondT TH03:30PM-05:20PMBMH.107
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[1. Core Courses|Pedagogical] This course explores the major theoretical principles upon which education for children and adults may be based. It also examines the notion of 'normative' characteristics of learners as well as current trends in the application of theory to classroom situations.

2607ENGL.1016.A2
English Literatures
Morgan, DawnT TH08:30AM-09:50AMECH.G12
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

2614ENGL.1016.B2
English Literatures
Robinson, MatthewM W F10:30AM-11:20AMGMH.304
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

2621ENGL.1016.C2
English Literatures
McKim, ElizabethT TH11:30AM-12:50PMJDH.G6
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

2624ENGL.1016.D2
English Literatures
Tremblay, AnthonyT TH01:00PM-02:20PMGMH.207
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

2628ENGL.1016.E2
English Literatures
McConnell, KathleenM W F11:30AM-12:20PMECH.G12
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

2633ENGL.1016.F2
English Literatures
Desroches, DennisM W02:30PM-03:50PMJDH.205
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

2637ENGL.1016.G2
English Literatures
Allen, EllaT TH02:30PM-03:50PMGMH.207
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[1. Introductory Course] An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods

2684ENGL.2013.D
Research Methods in English
Sawler, TrevorW F09:00AM-10:20AMJDH.G5
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[2. Intermediate Course ] An introduction to the discipline and practice of English; specifically, the use of research and scholarly sources in academic writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 1006.

2683ENGL.2113.A
Creative Writing Skills
Ripley, AJM W F12:30PM-01:20PMMMH.307
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[2. Intermediate Course ] A course for students interested in writing poetry, prose, and/or scripts. Along with writing assignments and workshopping (critiquing each others' work), students give presentations or blog on topics that will help them develop writing skills. This course is also open to first-year students. Prerequisite: 5-10 page sample of work submitted to the instructor at least a week before registration, or ENGL 2123.

2682ENGL.2233.A
Acting & Theatre Prod. II
Ross, LisaT07:00PM-09:50PMECH.AUD
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[2. Intermediate Course ] Continued exploration of the fundamental elements that combine to create theatre. Through improvisations, exercises, monologues, and scenes, students learn the techniques of acting and stagecraft to further their awareness of the process of performance. Enrolment is restricted to those who have received permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 2213.

2680ENGL.2673.A
Literature and Catholicism I
Allen, EllaT TH11:30AM-12:50PMGMH.205
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[2. Intermediate Course ] An exploration of literature from the early Middle Ages to the later Renaissance that reflects Catholic teachings, traditions, and attitudes. Readings may include The Dream of the Rood, medieval poetry, mystery and morality plays, mystical and devotional writings, and authors such as Augustine, Chaucer, Langland, Skelton, More, Southwell, and Cranshaw. (Pre-­-1800.)

2679ENGL.2693.A
Reading Popular Culture
Desroches, DennisT TH10:00AM-11:20AMECH.G12
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[2. Intermediate Course ] Reading Popular Culture familiarizes students with important theoretical trends in the study of culture. Specific emphasis will be placed on key aspects of visual culture-television, film, the graphic novel, YouTube, fashion, and video games will be especially significant. We will also look at the history of leisure and entertainment to help us understand what it means to be both a producer and a consumer of popular culture. (Post-1800)

2678ENGL.2733.A
Fiction,Drama & Film:II
Donovan, StewartT04:00PM-06:50PMBMH.101
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[2. Intermediate Course ]A study of the nature of narrative in fiction, drama, and film, but there is a more specific consideration of the art of adaptation - its thematic, technical, and aesthetic triumphs and pitfalls. (Categories: Genres, Cultural Studies).

2677ENGL.2753.A
Major Canadian Writers
Prescott, JoshuaT TH02:30PM-03:50PMGMH.304
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[2. Intermediate Course ] An examination of selected writers who have made a significant contribution to Canadian literature. (Post-1800; Canadian/American literature).

2676ENGL.2813.A
History of the English Lang.
Wilkie, RodgerM W F01:30PM-02:20PMJDH.G5
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[2. Intermediate Course ] This course traces the English language from its Indo-European and Germanic origins to its current world language status. Students will explore contacts with other languages, and the social forces behind those contacts. We will also address the question of whether English constitutes one language or many. (Language)

2675ENGL.3103.A
Advanced Poetry Workshop
McConnell, KathleenTH07:00PM-09:50PMECH.223
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[3. Advanced Course] This is an advanced course for students who discovered an affinity for poetry in the introductory course(s). This course provides the opportunity for students to generate and rewrite poems. Prerequisite: ENGL 2103 or 2123.

2605ENGL.3216.A2
Adv. Acting & Theatre Prod.
Ross, LisaTH02:30PM-05:20PMECH.AUD
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[3. Advanced Course] A course that focuses on the text as a performance vehicle written not only for readers, but more immediately for actors, directors, and designers. The course includes a public production. In-class presentations are also a major component of the course. Enrolment is restricted to those who have received permission from the instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 2233.

2674ENGL.3223.A
Auteur Cinema
Donovan, StewartTH04:00PM-06:50PMBMH.101
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[3. Advanced Course] A study of the cinema of some of the major auteurs of the 20th century. Among the artists considered are Sergei Eisenstein, Jean Renoir, Howard Hawks, Alfred Hitchcock, Luis Bunuel, Ingmar Bergman, Federico Fellini, Mike Leigh, Jean-Luc Godard, Martin Scorsese, and David Cronenberg. Prerequisite: ENGL 2723. (Post-1800.)

2568ENGL.3326.A2
The 17th Century
Smith, LeslieW F09:00AM-10:20AMGMH.204
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[3. Advanced Course]A study of the prose and poetry of Jonson, Donne, Herbert, and Milton, and the minor writers of the age. (Pre-1800).

2565ENGL.3356.A2
Arthurian Literature
Schutz, AndreaM W F10:30AM-11:20AMBMH.102
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[3. Advanced Course] An exploration of the extensive traditions surrounding King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table. (Pre-1800.)

2673ENGL.3373.A
The Romantic Period II
McKim, ElizabethT TH02:30PM-03:50PMJDH.G6
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[3. Advanced Course] A study of the writings of William Blake, Percy and Mary Shelley, and their contemporaries. (Post-1800.)

2672ENGL.3393.A
Victorian Authors and Movement
Wilkie, RodgerT TH08:30AM-09:50AMMMH.106
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[3. Advanced Course] A study of the works of selected British Victorian authors (such as the Brontë sisters, Eliot, Tennyson, the Brownings, the Rossetti siblings, Morris, etc.) in the context of the movements they initiated (such as the Pre-­-Raphaelites, Arts and Crafts, Socialism, Aesthetics, etc.). (Post-1800.)

2559ENGL.3416.A2
American Literature
Robinson, MatthewM W F12:30PM-01:20PMGMH.304
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[3. Advanced Course] A study of the major authors of nineteenth and twentieth century American Literature. (Post-1800; American.)

2671ENGL.3443.A
World Literature II
Tremblay, AnthonyT TH10:00AM-11:20AMGMH.207
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[3. Advanced Course] An introduction to the range of literary expressions of writers from the Indian Subcontinent. The two major genres studied are the novel and short fiction, though poetry and essays are also examined. The focus of the course is to study the concerns of the colonized, those who were swept up by British expansion in the 18th and 19th centuries. (Post-1800.)

2670ENGL.3463.A
Contemporary Canadian Theatre
Prescott, JoshuaT TH11:30AM-12:50PMECH.103
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[3. Advanced Course] An analysis of recent Canadian plays with an emphasis on their cultural contexts, structural forms, and performance receptions. Students examine post-Centennial Canadian theatre with an emphasis on emergent writing styles and dramaturgical structures and their relationship to their cultural context. Playwrights and text creators considered may include Nowlan and Learning, Theatre Passe Murielle, Watson, Clark, Young, Hollingsworth, and Tannehill. (Post-1800; Canadian)

2669ENGL.3813.A
Theories of Gender
Desroches, DennisT TH01:00PM-02:20PMJDH.205
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[3. Advanced Course] An exploration of contemporary theories of gender and sexuality, focusing on the manner in which gender, sexuality, and their attendant identity politics are re-visioned in terms of their constructedness, over against normalizing conceptions of sexual identity. Readings are taken from a diversity of disciplines, including psychoanalysis, sociology, anthropology, feminism, philosophy, and literary theory. (Post-1800.)

2667ENGL.4153.A
Indep. Proj. in Creative Writ.
McConnell, KathleenT07:00PM-09:50PMMMH.201
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[3. Advanced Course] The Senior Project gives a student the opportunity to work on an extended project, as author, translator or chief editor. Beginning with a proposal including a description of the project and a survey of similar works, students will create or compile an extended text. It is recommended that students take ENGL 4153 in their final year of study. The prerequisites are one of the following courses: ENGL 3103, 3113, 3123, or 3133 and permission of the instructor.

2666ENGL.4213.A
Sem. in Directing for Stage
Ross, LisaW07:00PM-09:50PMECH.AUD
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[3. Advanced Course] In this capstone course in the Drama Concentration, students further explore script analysis and the practical aspects of staging theatre by reading plays and secondary sources, and engaging in exercises that explore stage composition. The course culminates in a public performance of a short play or scene directed by each student. Enrolment is restricted to those who have received permission from the instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 3216.

2552ENGL.4336.A2
The Inklings
Schutz, AndreaM07:00PM-09:50PMMMH.201
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[3. Advanced Course]This course explores the works of the twentieth-century group of writers known as the Inklings, whose members included Charles Williams, C. S. Lewis, and J. R. R. Tolkien. These Christian writers produced some of the most influential modern fantasy literature. We will consider their role in shaping the genre, consider the relation of form to content, and discuss their impact on the subsequent development of the genre. 6 credit hours. (Categories: Authors and Authorship, Genre)

2820ENGL.4736.A2
Topics:Medieval Epic &Romance
Schutz, AndreaM W02:30PM-03:50PMECH.320
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[3. Advanced Course] We will read (in translation) medieval European epics and romances from the 8th-14th Centuries. Texts may include Beowulf, Volsungasaga, Song of Roland, Poetic Edda, The Cid and works by Chrètien de Troyes and others. Prerequisites: admission to the Honours program in English, or 3.7 GPA standing for English Majors.

2482ENVS.1013.C
Intro. to Environmental Prob.
Glynn, TracyT TH01:00PM-02:20PMBMH.102
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Earth systems science reveals that the environmental conditions that supported the development of human civilization over the past 10,000 years are becoming increasingly destabilized. This course introduces students to the Earth's regulatory systems such as climate, nitrogen and phosphorus flows, forests, oceans and biodiversity, and the social structures and processes that are interfering with them. Students will come to understand that environmental problems cannot be solved by individual behavioural changes; solutions will require collective action to achieve systemic change.

2483ENVS.2023.A
Intro Perspect.on Environment
Harvey, JaniceT TH11:30AM-12:50PMMMH.203
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Social systems are constructed on a set of dominant beliefs, assumptions and values that are largely unexamined but shape the way societies perceive and interact with the natural world. In this course, students examine the dominant perspectives that give rise to environmental degradation, as well as alternative paradigms offered by Green, eco-justice, global south, sustainability, and indigenous movements. Students also engage with political, economic and cultural theories of environmental change. Prerequisite: ENVS 1013 or permission of the instructor.

2484ENVS.3013.A
Env. Policy
Harvey, JaniceT TH04:00PM-05:20PMMMH.202
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The modernist view is that knowledge leads to rational decisions. From an environmental perspective, however, this idea is seriously challenged. Never has society known so much about ecological and climate change; yet collective responses to these changes have failed to reverse the downward trends. This course examines this dynamic by examining the politics of the environmental crisis, and in particular the power struggles between those resisting change and those promoting alternative visions of a sustainable society. We consider how those alternative visions translate into public policy and how citizens can engage to make this happen. Prerequisites: ENVS 1013 and ENVS 2023, or permission of the instructor.

2744ESL.1023.B
Eng for Acad: Read and Writ II
Van Den Broeck, ChrisM W F10:30AM-11:20AMMMH.201
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[1.ESL Courses]This course will help students whose first language is not English further develop academic reading and writing skills. The reading techniques to be improved will include skimming, previewing, predicting and in-depth analyzing. The types of writing practiced will be summaries, paraphrases and essays (cause and effect, and persuasive). Vocabulary-building and grammar will also be important components of the course. Students will also develop their ability to conduct library-based research and to synthesize information for writing assignments. Prerequisite: ESL 1013 or Director's permission. Co-requisite: ESL 1043.

2746ESL.1043.B
Eng for Acad: Speak and Lis II
Van Den Broeck, ChrisM W F11:30AM-12:20PMMMH.201
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[1.ESL Courses]This course helps students whose first language is not English to develop the speaking and listening skills required in university studies. The basic elements of oral expression and comprehension will be studied: sounds, word and sentence stress, rhythm, intonation, comprehension of weak forms, and connected speech. Listening skills will include intensive, selective and interactive tasks, such as note-taking. Speaking functions will include presenting information, asking questions and debating. 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: ESL 1033 or Director's permission. Co-requisite: ESL 1023.

2749ESL.1063.A
Maritime Arts and Culture
Humble, LinnetT TH04:00PM-05:20PMGMH.204
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[2.Integrated Courses]Students will read a representative selection, in the original English or in translation, of short stories, poems and excerpts from novels and plays from major voices of the Maritimes, including First Nations, Acadians, Anglophones and multicultural communities. Challenges posed by writing and translating regional dialects and the languages of other groups will be examined. Students will also study films, visual art and music. They will investigate the category of identity and the tensions between regional/national and inclusion/exclusion within the production of Maritime culture.

2751ESL.2213.B
Adv. Eng. for Acad. Purposes I
James, ArthurM W F10:30AM-11:20AMMMH.204
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[1.ESL Courses]This course is designed to assist ESL students in meeting the language-related expectations of university courses. The primary focus will be on academic writing skills. Attention will also be devoted to listening, speaking, reading, grammar, and vocabulary acquisition. Language skills will be linked to academic content from a number of disciplines. The course is intended for students whose first language is not English and whose TOEFL scores are between 550 and 599 (or a recognized equivalent). Prerequisite: ESL 1023 or Director's permission.

2753ESL.2223.B
Adv. Eng. for Acad. Purpose II
James, ArthurT TH02:30PM-03:50PMMMH.201
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[1.ESL Courses]This course is designed to assist ESL students in further developing their ability to meet the language-related expectations of university courses. The emphasis will be on refining writing skills. Attention will also be devoted to listening, speaking, reading, grammar, and vocabulary acquisition. Students will explore how the various language skills are interconnected in the university context. The course is intended for students whose first language is not English and whose TOEFL scores are between 550 and 599 (or a recognized equivalent). Prerequisite: ESL 2213 or Director's permission.

3028FNAR.1023.B
Music Theory and Performance
Peacock, StevenT TH04:00PM-05:20PMMMH.101
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The course examines the basic elements of music (notation, intervals, keys, scales, chords, meter) from a practical, hands-on perspective and introduces music theory and performance. Assignments include recognizing notes and rhythms on the staff, singing, and playing instruments. Please note that previous music experience is welcome but not required for this course.

3029FNAR.1031.A
Ear Training and Sight Singing
Peacock, StevenT TH02:30PM-03:50PMMMH.101
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Ear Training and Sight Singing I and II are one-semester introductory courses to music notation and performance. As music is sound, it is notated and read from notes on a page. Sight singing deals with how to translate notes into sound, and ear training, the reverse process, with how to write down the sounds that we hear. Singing in tune is an absolute requirement to pass this class; aural and/or sight singing activities occur in each and every meeting. Aural skills' development include dictation of intervals, chords, scales, rhythmic exercises, single line melodic exercises and two-part diatonic exercises. Sight singing activities include both group and individual performances of melodies and rhythms. There is limited practice time in class, so students are expected to extensively practice these components outside of class time. The class meets three hours a week, but the course earns only one credit per semester. This class is eligible to earn performance credits towards the Minor in Music. Please note: Whereas helpful, no previous musical experience is necessary; it is suggested to take FNAR 1031 simultaneously with FNAR 1023 - Music Theory and Performance.

3005FNAR.1051.A2
STU Singers I
Simonds, RossM05:30PM-06:50PMMMH.101
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The St. Thomas Singers is a no-audition choir, open to students and the academic community at large. Rehearsals take place once a week; with at least two concert performances per year towards the end of each term. The course earns one credit per year. A course fee may be required for the purchase of scores and other performance expenses. No previous knowledge of music is necessary.

3030FNAR.1113.B
Practical Intro. to Art Fund.
Forrestall, WilliamW02:30PM-05:20PMJDH.212
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This course is a practical introduction to concepts, basic materials, processes and the vocabulary of art and design delivered through slide lectures, readings and assigned projects. The concepts introduced in this course are applicable to a wide range of art and design practices. There are special presentations including visiting artist presentations, film screenings and trips to art galleries.

3426FNAR.1133.A
Intro. to Musical Theatre
Breen, TaniaM W F01:30PM-02:20PMMMH.101
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Introduction to Musical Theatre is a primer for students who are curious about performing, and would like the opportunity to grow their skills in a supportive environment. This course introduces students to the tools of musical theatre performance. It stresses their development as performers through individual and group exercises in physical and emotional awareness, basic music theory, movement, scene study, character creation and voice technique. The class will culminate in a studio performance. Students who have taken FNAR 2136 and/or FNAR 3136 are not permitted to take this course.

3031FNAR.1231.A
Dance Technique I
Dodson, LesandraM02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.101
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This course offers students fundamental training in jazz and contemporary dance. During the course, students will develop strength, flexibility, muscular control, endurance, and discipline; improve their technical proficiency in a variety of dance styles; learn dance terminology; cultivate their performance skills; and examine the contributions of significant choreographers from 1900 to the present. The course culminates in a public performance. The instructor will adapt exercises to the abilities of individual students. All levels welcome. Prerequisite: Instructor's consent

3007FNAR.2051.A2
STU Singers II
Simonds, RossM05:30PM-06:50PMMMH.101
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The St. Thomas Singers is a no-audition choir, open to students and the academic community at large. Rehearsals take place once a week; with at least two concert performances per year towards the end of each term. The course earns one credit per year. A course fee may be required for the purchase of scores and other performance expenses. No previous knowledge of music is necessary.

3061FNAR.2136.A2
Musical Theatre I
Breen, TaniaM W F10:30AM-11:20AMMMH.101
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In this course, students research, rehearse and perform a musical. To this end, students will learn how to prepare for a role; engage in a rehearsal process; implement acting, singing, and dancing techniques in performance; assist with technical elements; and demonstrate professionalism in their work. The course culminates in a fully-staged production of a musical for a public audience. Musical Theatre I is a year-ong course to be taken with Acting, Singing, Dancing I. First-year students welcome. Prerequisites: Instructor's consent. Co-requisites: FNAR 2153 (Acting, Singing, Dancing I).

3063FNAR.2153.A2
Acting, Singing, Dancing I
Breen, TaniaM W F11:30AM-12:20PMMMH.101
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This course offers students intensive training in acting, singing, and dancing. Students will learn fundamental acting techniques and apply them to scenes and songs from the musical theatre repertoire. In addition, students will do practical exercises to develop their breathing, phonation, resonance, and articulation skills. Students will also hone their dancing abilities by taking jazz classes. Acting, Singing, Dancing I is a year-long course to be taken with Musical Theatre I. Prerequisites: None. Co-requisites: FNAR 2136 (Musical Theatre I).

3075FNAR.2231.A
Dance Technique II
Dodson, LesandraM02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.101
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This course offers students fundamental training in jazz and contemporary dance. During the course, students will develop strength, flexibility, muscular control, endurance, and discipline; improve their technical proficiency in a variety of dance styles; learn dance terminology; cultivate their performance skills; and examine the contributions of significant choreographers from 1900 to the present. The course culminates in a public performance. The instructor will adapt exercises to the abilities of individual students. All levels welcome. Prerequisite: Instructor's consent and FNAR 1231.

3038FNAR.2283.A
Brancusi & Essence of Things
Peck, RobinT TH11:30AM-12:50PMMMH.309
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This is a seminar study of legendary early modernist sculptor Constantin Brancusi. It will consist of a series of lectures and follow-up seminar discussions on Brancusi's work, from his early work under the influence of Rodin through various well-known series, including Bird in Space, The Kiss, and Endless Column and Brancusi's lasting influence on contemporary art. Prerequisite: FNAR 1113.

3039FNAR.2313.A
Introductory Painting
Forrestall, WilliamT02:30PM-05:20PMJDH.212
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FNAR 2313 Introductory Painting offers an in-depth exploration of contemporary painting processes and practices using traditional and non-traditional materials, techniques, and concepts. Students will engage in a series of research and painting projects that will examine contemporary aspects of painting as a distinct discipline. Students will be expected to complete a portfolio of paintings suitable for in class critical analysis and public group exhibition. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Introduction to Art Fundamentals FNAR 1113

3040FNAR.2813.A
Chamber Music I
Kutnowski, MartinT TH01:00PM-02:20PMMMH.101
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This class, which can be taken sequentially for up to six semesters, is an in-depth exploration of chamber music. Students perform, arrange, and/or compose music, and develop an intimate analytical and stylistic knowledge of the repertoire. The music is selected from different time periods and musical styles, or composed and adapted to the skills of the individual students. Assignments include reading and rehearsing scores, creating ad-hoc arrangements to adapt the music to the available instruments, composing new pieces, and researching analytical and historical aspects of the music and composers studied. The course concludes with a public concert of chamber music. Prerequisites: FNAR-1051 and FNAR-1023, or permission from the instructor.

3041FNAR.2823.A
Chamber Music II
Kutnowski, MartinT TH01:00PM-02:20PMMMH.101
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This class, which can be taken sequentially for up to six semesters, is an in-depth exploration of chamber music. Students perform, arrange, and/or compose music, and develop an intimate analytical and stylistic knowledge of the repertoire. The music is selected from different time periods and musical styles, or composed and adapted to the skills of the individual students. Assignments include reading and rehearsing scores, creating ad-hoc arrangements to adapt the music to the available instruments, composing new pieces, and researching analytical and historical aspects of the music and composers studied. The course concludes with a public concert of chamber music. Prerequisites: FNAR-1051 and FNAR-1023, or permission from the instructor.

3045FNAR.3013.A
Music and Meaning
Kutnowski, MartinT TH10:00AM-11:20AMMMH.101
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Is music a language? Do musical works have meaning? Is there universality in the semantics of music? Are there universal ways to represent love, anger, or sadness? This course explores various types of music (folk, classical, film, TV) and helps the student develop a critical aural and analytical habit. Prerequisites: FNAR 1303 or any 2000-level course in music with a grade of B or better (possible courses include FNAR 1013, FNAR 2213, FNAR 2016, FNAR 2133, FNAR 2053,FNAR 2063, or any 3000-level course in music (possible courses include FNAR 3213, or permission by the instructor.

3009FNAR.3051.A2
STU Singers III
Simonds, RossM05:30PM-06:50PMMMH.101
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The St. Thomas Singers is a no-audition choir, open to students and the academic community at large. Rehearsals take place once a week; with at least two concert performances per year towards the end of each term. The course earns one credit per year. A course fee may be required for the purchase of scores and other performance expenses. No previous knowledge of music is necessary.

3065FNAR.3136.A2
Musical Theatre II
Breen, TaniaM W F10:30AM-11:20AMMMH.101
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In this course, students research, rehearse and perform a musical. To this end, students will learn how to prepare for a role; engage in a rehearsal process; implement acting, singing, and dancing techniques in performance; assist with technical elements; and demonstrate professionalism in their work. The course culminates in a fully-staged production of a musical for a public audience. Musical Theatre II is a year-long course to be taken with Acting, Singing, Dancing II. Prerequisites: Instructor's consent and FNAR 2136. Co-requisites: FNAR 3153 (Acting, Singing, Dancing II).

3067FNAR.3153.A2
Acting, Singing, Dancing II
Breen, TaniaM W F11:30AM-12:20PMMMH.101
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This course offers students intensive training in acting, singing, and dancing. Students will learn fundamental acting techniques and apply them to scenes and songs from the musical theatre repertoire. In addition, students will do practical exercises to develop their breathing, phonation, resonance, and articulation skills. Students will also hone their dancing abilities by taking jazz classes. Acting, Singing, Dancing II is a year-long course to be taken with Musical Theatre II. Prerequisites: FNAR 2153. Co-requisites: FNAR 3136 (Musical Theatre II).

3076FNAR.3231.A
Dance Technique III
Dodson, LesandraM02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.101
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This course offers students fundamental training in jazz and contemporary dance. During the course, students will develop strength, flexibility, muscular control, endurance, and discipline; improve their technical proficiency in a variety of dance styles; learn dance terminology; cultivate their performance skills; and examine the contributions of significant choreographers from 1900 to the present. The course culminates in a public performance. The instructor will adapt exercises to the abilities of individual students. All levels welcome. Prerequisite: Instructor's consent and FNAR 2231.

3046FNAR.3313.A
Figure Modeling II
Peck, RobinTH02:30PM-05:20PMJDH.212
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Artists have created portraits of people for thousands of years. In sculpture, a portrait of a person's face often includes the neck and part of the shoulders and chest. These works of sculpture are portrait busts. Students will model life-size three-dimensional portrait bustssin clay from a live model. Students are introduced to various forms of realism and abstraction. It is not necessary to have artistic talent to do well in this course. Prerequisites: FNAR 1113 and FNAR 2273.

3042FNAR.3813.A
Chamber Music III
Kutnowski, MartinT TH01:00PM-02:20PMMMH.101
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This class, which can be taken sequentially for up to six semesters, is an in-depth exploration of chamber music. Students perform, arrange, and/or compose music, and develop an intimate analytical and stylistic knowledge of the repertoire. The music is selected from different time periods and musical styles, or composed and adapted to the skills of the individual students. Assignments include reading and rehearsing scores, creating ad-hoc arrangements to adapt the music to the available instruments, composing new pieces, and researching analytical and historical aspects of the music and composers studied. The course concludes with a public concert of chamber music. Prerequisites: FNAR-1051 and FNAR-1023, or permission from the instructor.

3043FNAR.3823.A
Chamber Music IV
Kutnowski, MartinT TH01:00PM-02:20PMMMH.101
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This class, which can be taken sequentially for up to six semesters, is an in-depth exploration of chamber music. Students perform, arrange, and/or compose music, and develop an intimate analytical and stylistic knowledge of the repertoire. The music is selected from different time periods and musical styles, or composed and adapted to the skills of the individual students. Assignments include reading and rehearsing scores, creating ad-hoc arrangements to adapt the music to the available instruments, composing new pieces, and researching analytical and historical aspects of the music and composers studied. The course concludes with a public concert of chamber music. Prerequisites: FNAR-1051 and FNAR-1023, or permission from the instructor.

3011FNAR.4051.A2
STU Singers IV
Simonds, RossM05:30PM-06:50PMMMH.101
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The St. Thomas Singers is a no-audition choir, open to students and the academic community at large. Rehearsals take place once a week; with at least two concert performances per year towards the end of each term. The course earns one credit per year. A course fee may be required for the purchase of scores and other performance expenses. No previous knowledge of music is necessary.

3069FNAR.4136.A2
Musical Theatre III
Breen, TaniaM W F10:30AM-11:20AMMMH.101
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In this course, students research, rehearse and perform a musical. To this end, students will learn how to prepare for a role; engage in a rehearsal process; implement acting, singing, and dancing techniques in performance; assist with technical elements; and demonstrate professionalism in their work. The course culminates in a fully-staged production of a musical for a public audience. Musical Theatre III is a year-long course to be taken with Acting, Singing, Dancing III. Prerequisites: Instructor's consent and FNAR 3136. Co-requisites: FNAR 4153 (Acting, Singing, Dancing III).

3071FNAR.4153.A2
Acting, Singing, Dancing III
Breen, TaniaM W F11:30AM-12:20PMMMH.101
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This course offers students intensive training in acting, singing, and dancing. Students will learn fundamental acting techniques and apply them to scenes and songs from the musical theatre repertoire. In addition, students will do practical exercises to develop their breathing, phonation, resonance, and articulation skills. Students will also hone their dancing abilities by taking jazz classes. Acting, Singing, Dancing III is a year-long course to be taken with Musical Theatre III. Prerequisites: FNAR 3153. Co-requisites: FNAR 4136 (Musical Theatre III).

2905FREN.1016.A2
Langue Francaise 1
Allain, AliceT TH08:30AM-09:50AMECH.G14
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]This course is designed for students entering university who achieved a score of Basic, Basic+ or Intermediate in French in high school. The aims of this course are listening comprehension,basic oral expression, elementary reading, writing and grammar.

3334FREN.1016.B2
Langue Francaise 1
Goguen, ElisabethT TH08:30AM-09:50AMECH.320
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]This course is designed for students entering university who achieved a score of Basic, Basic+ or Intermediate in French in high school. The aims of this course are listening comprehension,basic oral expression, elementary reading, writing and grammar.

2899FREN.1026.A2
Langue Francaise 2
Gaudet, JeannetteM W F10:30AM-11:20AMECH.G14
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]This course is designed for New Brunswick students entering university who have achieved a score of Intermediate+ or above in French in high school. The course has a strong reading component with material drawn from a variety of sources in the francophone world. It emphasizes the four skills: oral practice, reading, writing and listening comprehension.

2903FREN.1026.B2
Langue Francaise 2
Allain, AliceT TH10:00AM-11:20AMECH.G14
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]This course is designed for New Brunswick students entering university who have achieved a score of Intermediate+ or above in French in high school. The course has a strong reading component with material drawn from a variety of sources in the francophone world. It emphasizes the four skills: oral practice, reading, writing and listening comprehension.

3135FREN.2123.A
Decouverte de la Poesie
Goguen, ElisabethM W05:30PM-06:50PMECH.124
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[Module 2: Civilisation du monde francophone] Parce qu'ils mobilisent l'imaginaire et l'esprit de découverte, les textes poétiques et dramatiques peuvent être sources de plaisir et de motivation à la lecture et à l'écriture. En examinant les rapports sons/sens de la poésie et les rapports texte/représentation du théâtre, l'étudiant arrivera à apprécier les qualités de ces genres.

2894FREN.2306.A2
Textes: niveau 2
Mbarga, ChristianT TH11:30AM-12:50PMECH.124
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[Module 1: Langue francaise] Ce cours cherche à approfondir et à étendre les connaissances de base acquises. Par un choix de lectures variées, le cours vise à améliorer la compréhension de textes écrits, à faciliter l'apprentissage du vocabulaire, et à familiariser les étudiants avec le monde et les cultures de la Francophonie.

2864FREN.2316.A2
Grammaire Du Francais
Gaudet, JeannetteM W F12:30PM-01:20PMECH.223
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[Module 1: Langue francaise] Révision et approfondissement des règles de base de la grammaire française: la conjugaison du verbe, les modes et temps du verbe, les accords, les compléments, les pronoms personnels et relatifs. Étude de la forme de la phrase, de la syntaxe et de la fonction des mots. Préalable: FREN 1016 et/ou FREN 1026 ou la permission du professeur.

2851FREN.2326.A2
La Composition
Francis, CeciliaT TH01:00PM-02:20PMECH.G14
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]Destiné aux étudiants ayant une bonne connaissance des rudiments de la grammaire française, ce cours vise à développer des compétences dans le domaine de la rédaction et de la révision de textes et de travaux écrits. L'étudiant apprendra à structurer et à nuancer sa pensée à l'aide de modalités rhétoriques et de stratégies argumentatives mises en application. Seront privilégiées les pratiques discursives suivantes: le portrait, la description, la narration, l'essai, l'article journalistique, la dissertation classique, l'explication de texte, le compte rendu et la correspondance. Il est fortement recommandé aux étudiants de suivre en même temps le cours FREN 2316. Cours préalable : FREN 1016 ou FREN 1026.

3001FREN.2333.A
Conversational French
Mbarga, ChristianT TH02:30PM-03:50PMECH.223
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[Module 1: Langue francaise]This course is designed for students who wish to improve their abilities in spoken French and listening comprehension. It will focus on developing skills and lexical flexibility for participating actively in a normal converstion with native interlocutors, on presenting and defending opinions on a variety of subjects in social and professional situations. Prerequisite: FREN 2333 is open to students with Intermediate+, or Advanced level of oral proficiency.

3134FREN.3643.A
Topics:Litterature Acadiènne
Goguen, ElisabethM W04:00PM-05:20PMECH.124
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[Module 2: Civilisation du monde francophone|Foundation Courses] Acquisition d'une connaissance générale de la littérature acadienne, dans une perspective globale qui tient compte des réalités socioéconomique et politique, du climat culturel et artistique dans lesquels les oeuvres ont été produites. Analyse de quelques oeuvres représentatives. Cours préalable: FREN 2306 ou FREN 2113 et FREN 2123 ou la permission du professeur.

2999FREN.4543.A
Tout feu tout flamme
Francis, CeciliaT TH04:00PM-05:20PMECH.G14
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[Module 2: Civilisation du monde francophone|Theme Courses] De l'amour à la haine en passant par la jalousie, l'ambition, la culpabilité, la vengeance et la folie, les passions inspirent depuis tout temps le geste créateur. Un examen de la représentation de passions dans une sélection d'oeuvres contemporaines et classiques (romans, poèmes, pièces de théâtre et films.)

2994FREN.4593.A
Écrits des fem.écrits sur fem
Mbarga, ChristianT TH10:00AM-11:20AMECH.320
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[Module 2: Civilisation du monde francophone|Theme Courses] Ce cours a pour objet d'examiner les thèmes récurrents dans la littérature écrite par des femmes ou traitant de problèmes d'importance capitale pour les femmes dans leurs sociétés respectives. Cet examen se fera à travers des nouvelles, des extraits de romans et d'autres documents du 19e au 21e siècles choisis dans la Francophonie.

2941GEND.2016.A2
Intro. to Women's Studies
Campbell, MargaretT TH10:00AM-11:20AMMMH.203
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This is the introductory course to the interdisciplinary field of Women's Studies and Gender Studies. The basis of femininity, masculinity and women's inequality are examined in the context of wider social relations, including the historical subject, literary voice and the women's movement.

2440GERO.1023.A
Multidiscipl. Issues in Aging
Durkee Lloyd, JanetT TH10:00AM-11:20AMBMH.102
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This course examines the various factors that impact growing older in Canadian society. Topics to be discussed include: health care, pensions, housing, transportation, family life, social support and death and dying.

2442GERO.1023.B
Multidiscipl. Issues in Aging
Durkee Lloyd, JanetT TH02:30PM-03:50PMECH.G12
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This course examines the various factors that impact growing older in Canadian society. Topics to be discussed include: health care, pensions, housing, transportation, family life, social support and death and dying.

2445GERO.2113.A
Sociology of Aging
Caissie, LindaM W05:30PM-06:50PMBMH.102
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This course will explore the comparative situation of older women and men in different cultures and different historical periods within western societies. The cultural and social-structural determinants of their changing status will be examined through alternative theoretical perspectives within sociology. The social construction of 'elderly' as a status will be explored through how older people are perceived, described, talked about, and interacted with within everyday behaviour, and how these relations may be 'negotiated' by the elderly themselves. The political economy of aging focuses upon disparities of income, and the determinants and effects of poverty on the lives of older people. Prerequisite: GERO 1013 or SOCI 1003.

2448GERO.2273.A
Death and Dying
Caissie, LindaM W02:30PM-03:50PMBMH.102
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This course explores a wide range of topics in the area of death and dying. As a fundamental issue for human beings, these phenomena require investigation from a variety of perspectives. The course considers aspects of death and dying that are religious, philosophical, psychological, and sociological in nature. Further, the course is concerned with both practical and theoretical issues that arise from the relationship between aging, and death and dying.

2454GERO.3123.A
Counselling Older Adults
Randall, WilliamT02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.203
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This course considers several important aspects of counseling, broadly defined, as they impact on work with older adults. Topics include: an overview of counseling theories and strategies; the range of emotional, developmental, spiritual, and interpersonal issues for which older adults might seek or need counseling (e.g., substance abuse, elder abuse, bereavement, depression); the benefits of alternative therapeutic modalities (music therapy, pet therapy, etc.); and the value of reminiscence and life review - or narrative care - in working with older adults. This course is most relevant to those preparing to work professionally in the field of aging. Limited enrolment. Prerequisites: GERO 1013 and GERO 1023.

2456GERO.4003.A
Mental Health and Aging
Durkee Lloyd, JanetT TH01:00PM-02:20PMGMH.205
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This course explores the range of factors affecting mental health in the elderly, from age-related organic brain disease, depression, and the other functional psychiatric disorders, to failure of adjustment induced by psychological, social, and environmental factors. Issues covered include the recognition of mental-health problems, their prevalence and dynamics; the cost to individual older people, their families, the health and community-care systems, and society; and the adequacy of current provisions and interventions. Prerequisites: GERO 1013, GERO 1023 and GERO 2673.

2458GERO.4023.A
Advan Seminar in Gerontology
Randall, WilliamM07:00PM-09:50PMHCH.5
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This course is intended for students in the final semester of the program. It consists of a multidisciplinary lecture-seminar format. Selected topics in aging research and intervention are discussed, including those that highlight the positive potential of the aging experience, e.g., the potential for creativity, wisdom, and continued personal growth. The purpose of this course is to ensure that students have a comprehensive background in the field of aging. Prerequisites: GERO 1013, GERO 1023 and an additional 18 credit hours of courses.

2802GRID.2206.A
Human Nature and Tech.
Zelazny, VivienM W F10:30AM-12:20PMHCH.5
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This course will study the way in which diverse thinkers have considered the question of human nature. This question will be sharpened with a consideration of the way in which human beings considered as natural beings use and are affected by technology. Texts will vary from year to year, but may include works such as: Aeschylus' Prometheus Bound, Bacon's New Atlantis, Swift's Gulliver's Travels, Grant's Technology and Empire, Miller's A Canticle for Leibowitz, Heidegger's The Question Concerning Technology, Shelley's Frankenstein, Gaskell's North and South, Achebe's Things Fall Apart, and Sterling's Holy Fire.

2803GRID.3106.A
Love and Friendship
Dinan, MatthewM W F12:30PM-02:20PMHCH.5
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This course will explore the interrelated themes of friendship, love, and beauty. Each theme will be examined separately and as connected to the others. Ancient and modern texts will be used to examine the ways that different ages have addressed these fundamentally personal and yet common human experiences. Texts will vary from year to year, but may include works such as Plato's Symposium, Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Shakespeare's Merry Wives of Windsor, Rousseau's Confessions, Waugh's Brideshead Revisited, LeGuin's Left Hand of Darkness, Woolf's Orlando, and Bellow's Ravelstein. Prerequisite: GRID 2006, or permission of the instructors.

2804GRID.3903.A
Honours Thesis Proposal
Dinan, MatthewT07:00PM-09:50PMHCH.5
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The purpose of this course is to afford students interested in writing an honours thesis the opportunity to develop a thorough proposal, including a substantial annotated bibliography. Students will work closely with their thesis director in developing and writing the thesis proposal. Classes will meet throughout the term to assess progress. Students will be required to present and defend their proposal before their classmates and the faculty of the Great Ideas Programme. Students must complete this course to be eligible for GRID 4906.

2806GRID.4913.A
Capstone Seminar
MacDonald, SaraW04:00PM-06:50PMMMH.204
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The capstone seminar in Great Ideas will be an author/work specific course in which students spend an extensive period of time studying the text(s) of a thinker who has greatly influenced the shape of the western world. The author or texts may be ancient or modern, and may be literary, historical, philosophic and/or political in nature.

3428GRID.4913.B
Capstone Seminar
Moore, AndrewTH07:00PM-09:50PMMMH.204
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The capstone seminar in Great Ideas will be an author/work specific course in which students spend an extensive period of time studying the text(s) of a thinker who has greatly influenced the shape of the western world. The author or texts may be ancient or modern, and may be literary, historical, philosophic and/or political in nature.

2608HIST.1006.A2
World History
Cross, BradleyM W F11:30AM-12:20PMJDH.G1
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[1. World]This course provides an overview of world history, from earliest times to the present. Major themes include human relationships with the environment, cultural exchanges between peoples, and the interconnectedness of the human experience. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1013 or HIST 1023.

2612HIST.1006.B2
World History
Walhain, LucM W F10:30AM-11:20AMJDH.G1
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[1. World]This course provides an overview of world history, from earliest times to the present. Major themes include human relationships with the environment, cultural exchanges between peoples, and the interconnectedness of the human experience. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1013 or HIST 1023.

2723HIST.1023.A
World History II
Watt, CareyT TH11:30AM-12:50PMBMH.102
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[1. World] This 3-credit course is part of the world history survey. It offers an overview of world history events, issues, themes and approaches from roughly 1400 of the Common Era (CE) to the present. It will cover topics such as the emergence of long-distance exploration, cross-cultural interaction, the early modern and modern worlds, the Columbian Exchange, industrialization, modern imperialism, world wars, networks and globalization from circa 1400 onward. Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for HIST 1006. Students may take HIST 1023 before HIST 1013.

2721HIST.2003.B
Exploring History
Torrie, JuliaT TH10:00AM-11:20AMGMH.204
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[10. Special]This mandatory course for History Majors and Honours students provides an introduction to the discipline of History. The course examines a variety of historiographical and method- ological approaches to History, as well as the history of History. It encourages students to re-examine their assumptions about History, but it will also help students develop their basic historical research and writing skills. Exploring History provides a foundation for upper-year History courses and students are strongly encouraged to take it before their third year. Prerequisite: At least 6 credit hours in History courses at St. Thomas University.

2720HIST.2033.A
Early Modern Europe
Mullin, JanetT TH11:30AM-12:50PMJDH.G5
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[6. Regions (Europe)]This course provides an introduction to early modern European history from the end of the so-called Middle Ages to the era of the French Revolution (more or less the 15th to the 18th centuries). Students will study social, cultural, political, economic and other develop- ments in order to better understand how societies we recognize today evolved from the rather different world of the late Middle Ages. The course traces themes and topics such as religious belief, absolutist politics, interactions between majorities and minorities, the changing status of women, and Europe's place in an increasingly global setting.

2718HIST.2143.A
Modern Africa
Gebrekidan, FikruT TH10:00AM-11:20AMECH.223
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[2. Regions (Africa)]Modern Africa surveys the history of Africa from the nineteenth century to the present. The course focuses on three major topics: the scramble for Africa and the partition, European colonial rules, and the assessment of the post-independence era. Subtopics include missionaries and explorers, occupation and forms of resistance, settler colonies versus non-settler colonies, nationals and war for independence, post-independence successes and challenges, the Cold War and the War on Terror, and globalization and the fading significance of the nation state. The objectives for this course are to challenge stereotypic notions about contemporary Africa, to contribute to students' understanding of Africa's place in the modern world, and to introduce students to some of the major historiographical debates on modern African history.

2602HIST.2206.A2
History of the Middle Ages
Mullin, JanetT TH04:00PM-05:20PMJDH.G5
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[6. Regions (Europe)]A survey of the imagined historical period between the fall of the classical Roman/Persian Empires and the emergence of an early modern state system. This course will range widely in its coverage, including glimpses of experience in parts of Africa and Asia as well as Europe. Special emphasis will be placed on social history and the use of primary sources to probe beyond simplified political narratives.

2708HIST.2613.A
Latin America:Colonial Period
Staff, M W02:30PM-03:50PMMMH.307
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[4. Regions (The Americas)]This course surveys three centuries of Latin American history from first contacts between the Spanish and Native American civilizations to Latin American revolutions for Independence. Major themes include various types of relations between the founding peoples and the development of colonial social, political, economic, and religious institutions.

2705HIST.2913.A
Historical Roots of Cont.Can
Huskins, BonnieM W04:00PM-05:20PMECH.103
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[7. State, Nation, and Locality (The Americas)]This course examines the historical roots of many of the key issues in contemporary Canadian society. In addition to providing students with a narrative framework of Canadian history since the mid-19th century, the course will emphasize the historical dimensions of many of the most controversial issues facing Canada today, such as Quebec separatism, Aboriginal Land Claims, Western Alienation, Canada-US relations, etc. Students who have taken HIST 2806 or HIST 2823 are excluded from this course.

2704HIST.3053.A
Disability in History
Gebrekidan, FikruT TH01:00PM-02:20PMECH.223
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[1. World]This course treats disability as a historical subject. It explores questions such as what it means to be disabled in various times and places, how people with disability lived their lives, how society at large conceptualized differences in physical ability and mental capacity, when and how disability intersected with other identity constructs, and the roles myth and religion played in all this.

2701HIST.3713.A
Making a Living in the USA
Huskins, BonnieT TH01:00PM-02:20PMECH.G12
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[7. State, Nation, and Locality (The Americas)] Making a Living in the United States examines the daily struggles of Americans to earn their daily bread over the last couple of centuries. This course will use such themes as work and workplaces, labour and capital relations, as well as the roles of gender, race, class, ethnicity and region in shaping how people made a living in the USA. There are no prerequisites for this course, however 3 credit hours in history is recommended.

2699HIST.3783.A
Film and History
Cross, BradleyW02:30PM-05:20PMECH.G11
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[1. World]Explores the relationship between film and history, paying close attention to film as an historical artifact and film as a means of historical interpretation. In studying films produced primarily in North America, Latin America, and Europe, students in this course will be asked to develop a vocabulary of film, and to try to analyse the meaning and significance of film, both as artifact and interpretation. Writing will require that students make their own arguments about how we should understand the complicated relationship between visual media and history.

3047HIST.3993.A
Sp.Top. Historian As Activist
Gebrekidan, FikruW F09:00AM-10:20AMECH.124
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[10. Special] William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (1868-1963) embodied the consummate public intellectual of his time: educator, prolific author, and internationalist. His exemplary civil rights career, ranging in scope from his writings on anti-Semitism to his support for women's suffrage and his role in founding the NAACP, serves as a window into early and mid-twentieth-century social movements. Through the catalytic role of Du Bois as a leading critic of global injustice, Historian as Social Activist studies the powerful role of public intellectuals on social transformation. Du Bois's own scholarly publications, newspaper editorials, as well as his vast international correspondence, provide the materials on which students will base term paper research and periodic assignments.

2600HIST.4026.A2
Food in World History
Torrie, JuliaT02:30PM-05:20PMECH.320
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[1. World]Food keeps us alive, serves as a marker of social status, a stimulator of exploration and trade, and a cause of conflict and war. This seminar is about the history of food production, consumption and culture world-wide. Participants explore the roles food plays in human soci- eties, the social and cultural meanings of food and the ways foods travel from place to place. Equally, we consider food's presence, its absence and the impact of man-made and natural disasters on eating habits and food supplies. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

2598HIST.4196.A2
Peoples History of Korea
Walhain, LucTH02:30PM-05:20PMECH.320
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[8. State, Nation, and Locality (Asia)] This seminar proposes an in-depth study of the modern history of Korea from the perspective of its least acknowledged, yet determinant, agent: the people. It examines major social movements which shaped Korean history and democratisation, e.g. the college student and labour movements. It also addresses Korea's geopolitical predicament from the viewpoint of some of its victims, such as the Korean sex slaves under Japanese colonial rule and Korea's political and economic prisoners of the Cold War. Prerequisite: HIST 1006 OR HIST 1013 & HIST 1023, OR permission of the instructor.

2764HMRT.1006.A2
Introduction to Human Rights
Szurlej, ChristinaT TH01:00PM-02:20PMJDH.G1
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This course will introduce students to the study of human rights by investigating the question what is a human right? The course will proceed primarily through a number of examples and case studies. Students will also be given an overview of the basic instruments, institutions, and ideas relevant to human rights.

2775HMRT.1006.B2
Introduction to Human Rights
Dipaolo O'Brien, AmandaW F09:00AM-10:20AMJDH.G1
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This course will introduce students to the study of human rights by investigating the question what is a human right? The course will proceed primarily through a number of examples and case studies. Students will also be given an overview of the basic instruments, institutions, and ideas relevant to human rights.

2782HMRT.1006.C2
Introduction to Human Rights
Comeau, MichaelT07:00PM-09:50PMJDH.G1
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This course will introduce students to the study of human rights by investigating the question what is a human right? The course will proceed primarily through a number of examples and case studies. Students will also be given an overview of the basic instruments, institutions, and ideas relevant to human rights.

3213HMRT.1006.D2
Introduction to Human Rights
Szurlej, ChristinaT TH08:30AM-09:50AMMMH.203
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This course will introduce students to the study of human rights by investigating the question what is a human right? The course will proceed primarily through a number of examples and case studies. Students will also be given an overview of the basic instruments, institutions, and ideas relevant to human rights.

2865HMRT.2013.A
Research Methods
Baker, KellyM W F10:30AM-11:20AMMMH.202
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The purpose of this course is to give students an introduction to research methods used in the study of human rights. The course will include methods of data collection as well as analysis of data. The course will begin with a general introduction to the aims and methods of research projects. Students in this course will do a research project in human rights under the supervision of the instructor. Students will be expected to present periodic reports on the status of their work.

2858HMRT.3013.A
Discrimination and the Law
Comeau, MichaelM W05:30PM-06:50PMJDH.G1
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This course will focus on domestic human rights codes and human rights commissions. Special attention will be given to the New Brunswick Human Rights Code and the New Brunswick Human Rights Commission.

2871HMRT.3033.A
Philosophy of Human Rights
Dipaolo O'Brien, AmandaT TH10:00AM-11:20AMECH.103
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This course will introduce students to philosophical questions concerning the foundations of human rights. What are human rights based on? What makes something a human right? Are human rights universally and permanently valid or is the notion of human rights merely a construct of modern Western culture? The course will familiarize students with alternative theoretical answers to these and other related questions.

2873HMRT.3073.A
Human Rights Internship
Dipaolo O'Brien, AmandaW02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.309
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This course will provide students with exposure to the practice of human rights by completing a supervised internship with a local nongovernmental organization. Students will be required to complete a detailed exit report and research paper that encourages them to reflect on the relationship between that experience and their formal human rights studies.

2875HMRT.3203.A
Human Rights and Media
Szurlej, ChristinaT TH04:00PM-05:20PMJDH.G1
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This course explores how the rise of social media has both advanced and hindered the protection of human rights by examining how social media provides a platform for instantaneous global information-sharing, rendering it increasingly difficult for state or business interests to shield human rights abuses from public scrutiny. Topics will be examined through a number of case studies Prerequisites. There are no prerequisites for this course.

2878HMRT.3803.A
Human Rights of the Child
Kotze, GavinW F09:00AM-10:20AMJDH.G2
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This course examines the legal human rights structures in Canada and internationally, as they apply to children and adolescents in unique and rapidly evolving ways. The primary focus is on domestic human rights legislation under provincial and federal human rights Acts. Various legal regimes, both local and international, related to immigration/refugee law, privacy law, health law, criminal law, education law, Aboriginal law, child welfare law, and other areas will be surveyed.

3351INTR.4016.A2
Interdis. Honours Thesis
Gillies, James-.
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The student, in consultation with her or his Advisory Committee, will submit a thesis proposal to the Interdisciplinary Steering Committee by the end of the third year of studies. The honours thesis is written in the fourth year of studies with guidance from the student's Programme Director.

2406IRSH.2006.A2
Intro. to Irish Studies
Nolan, LorraineM04:00PM-06:50PMECH.223
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A general introduction to Irish society and culture. This course will provide an overview of the unique characteristics of the island and its people. Students will have the opportunity to familiarize themselves with aspects of Ireland's land, cultural development, economy, politics, and literature.

2407IRSH.2113.A
Visualizing Irish Culture
Nolan, LorraineT02:30PM-05:20PMECH.320
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This course will examine the broad influence of the arts on Ireland through the history of Irish poetry, painting, drama, music, architecture, religion, fiction, and film. Prerequisite: IRSH 2006 or permission of the instructor.

2400IRSH.2183.A
Irish Language and Culture II
Smith, IanW F09:00AM-10:20AMGMH.207
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A continuation of IRSH 2173. This course will follow on from the first semester, building on students knowledge of the Irish Language so far. The course will focus more on topics practical to students to practise their Irish here in Canada and also if they find themselves in a real-life situation in Irish-speaking Ireland (e.g. making enquiries, interests, sport, food and drink, asking directions). The course will focus on the four skills of speaking, writing, reading and listening. Students will develop their speaking ability as well as their ability to converse. Students will continue to learn more about Irish culture on this topic-by-topic basis throughout. Prerequisite: IRSH 2173.

2848ITAL.1006.A2
Introduction to Italian
Temelini, MarkM W F12:30PM-01:20PMECH.G11
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[Italian]Introduction to the Italian Language. Phonetics, oral training, and conversation. Basic grammar with oral and written exercises. Basic reading and composition. Introduction to Italian civilization with the aid of audio-visual techniques.

2998ITAL.2043.A
Intermediate Italian II
Temelini, MarkM W F01:30PM-02:20PMMMH.202
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[Italian] This course is the continuation of Intermediate Italian I. Written assignments will improve the accuracy of grammatical structures. Conversation and oral exercises will enhance the student's ability to interact in a communicative environment.

3415ITAL.3043.A
Italian Cinema
Temelini, MarkT07:00PM-09:50PMMMH.307
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[Italian] This course uses film as a starting point for the refinement of students' reading, writing and speaking skills in Italian. Students will enrich their vocabulary and strengthen their use of more complex grammatical structures and idiomatic expressions, as well as learn to recognize regional differences in spoken Italian in cinematic contexts. The aim of the course is also to examine the Cinema of Italy as an instrument for observing Italian society. It will include showing snippets of films; and a screening, close study, and an analysis of a few masterpieces of Italian cinema, fostering a deeper understanding of both Italian language and culture. All screened films will be in Italian with English subtitles.

2590JOUR.1023.A
The Message:Great Stor. Jour
Wong, JanT TH08:30AM-09:50AMMMH.202
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[1. Journalism]This course will introduce students to a range of works of print and broadcast Journalism to allow them to understand the scope, purpose, and influence of stories in the journalistic tradition. Students will respond to these works in writing and post their responses in an online discussion forum.

2591JOUR.1023.B
The Message:Great Stor. Jour
Camp, MichaelT TH11:30AM-12:50PMMMH.308
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[1. Journalism]This course will introduce students to a range of works of print and broadcast Journalism to allow them to understand the scope, purpose, and influence of stories in the journalistic tradition. Students will respond to these works in writing and post their responses in an online discussion forum.

2592JOUR.2123.A
The Toolbox 2- Mobile Soc Med
Dickson, DonaldT TH02:30PM-03:50PMCBC.CBC
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[1. Journalism] This course introduces students to media production and storytelling, publication, podcasting and broadcasting using mobile technology and social media. Prerequisite: JOUR 2113 or permission of professor.

2593JOUR.3023.A
Radio and Podcasting
Tunney, MarkM02:30PM-05:20PMCBC.CBC
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[1. Journalism] This course explores the enduring power and influence of radio, and will allow students to produce podcasts and programming for a campus and community radio network. Prerequisite: JOUR 2123 or permission of professor.

2594JOUR.3033.A
The Power of Narrative
Wong, JanT TH11:30AM-12:50PMMMH.201
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[1. Journalism] This course explores the use of narrative in various media, and how storytelling remains the primary form of communication in the multi-media world.

2596JOUR.3143.A
Documentary
Tunney, MarkW02:30PM-05:20PMCBC.CBC
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[1. Journalism] This course introduces students to the art of documentary in various media. The course will explore the history of documentary and the resurgence of the art form in the digital age. Students will produce a short documentary as part of the course work. Prerequisite: JOUR 2123 or permission of professor.

2597JOUR.3173.A
Interviewing
Camp, MichaelW07:00PM-09:50PMMMH.308
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[1. Journalism] This course explores the art of the interview and the art of inquiry, allowing students to understand how to effectively ask and answer questions.

2536JOUR.4106.A2
Senior Seminar in Journalism
Lee, PhilipM02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.309
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[1. Journalism] Students will produce community-based digital journalism projects supervised by faculty and explore the ethics of producing journalism in the public interest.

2547JOUR.4116.A2
Journalism in the Field
Lee, PhilipTH02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.309
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[1. Journalism] Students will pursue experiential learning opportunities in journalism. These opportunities might include work in the student press, a professional newsroom, or the creation of a new digital publication.

2425JPNS.1023.A
Introductory Japanese II
Nishijima, MichikoM W02:30PM-03:50PMGMH.207
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Continuation of JPNS-1013. Focuses on communicative aspects as well as practice of reading and writing in Hiragana and Katakana. Some basic Kanji, the other writing system in Japanese, is introduced. Not open to native speakers.

2426JPNS.2023.A
Japanese II, Part 2
Nishijima, MichikoM W04:00PM-05:20PMGMH.207
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This course is a continuation of JPNS 2013. More overall language skills are developed. With this course students complete the beginner's level of Japanese and students are prepared for the Level IV Japanese Proficiency Test offered by the Government of Japan. Prerequisite: JPNS 2013.

2997LATI.1023.A
Introduction to Latin II
James, ArthurT TH10:00AM-11:20AMMMH.102
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[Latin]This course continues the introduction to classical Latin. Prerequisite: LATI 1013 with a minimum grade of C.

2714MATH.1023.A
Introduction to Calculus II
Gupta, SaritaT TH11:30AM-12:50PMECH.G11
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Conic sections; transcendental functions and their derivatives; techniques of integration; areas and volumes; Taylor's theorem. Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in MATH 1013.

3082MATH.2513.A
Introduction to Logic
Stapleford, ScottT TH10:00AM-11:20AMMMH.307
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A lecture course in which students learn how to identify and evaluate arguments drawn from a wide variety of sources. It will develop informal methods such as the identification of argument structure and informal fallacies. It will also develop formal methods that involve taking arguments in English, symbolizing them in a formal language, and evaluating strengths and weaknesses of the argument forms. Also covered are basic probability theory, inductive logic, and statistical reasoning.

2660NATI.1006.A2
Intro to Native Studies
Landry, MarkT07:00PM-09:50PMGMH.304
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of Native Studies. Its purpose is to increase the student's understanding and sensitivity towards the past and present experience of Native peoples. Using both oral and written records, the course will examine pre-contact history and culture, the influences of colonialism in the post-contact era, and contemporary issues.

2689NATI.2303.A
Sci., Ethics & Native People
Landry, MarkW07:00PM-09:50PMGMH.304
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This course is designed to introduce students to ethical issues that arise between the sciences (both social and physical) and indigenous peoples. Anthropology, education, psychology, archaeology, medicine, biology, and other disciplines follow lines of inquiry that impact indigenous peoples, and their theories, methods, interpretations, and interests are examined in relation to ethical considerations. We emphasize the concerns and point of view of Native people. The course may include issues of exhumation and public display of skeletal remains and sacred objects, control over access to information, the political relevance of research and its role in land claims, the ethics of assessment and drawing conclusions about the nature of indigenous peoples, and other topics.

2690NATI.3203.A
Native Philosophy
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH02:30PM-03:50PMHCH.200
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This course examines Native cosmologies (world views) and ways of thinking, feeling, and knowing as the foundation of indigenous spiritual, political, social, and economic systems. Defines the continuing existence and vitality of traditional Native philosophy and traces its influence on Western knowledge. Prerequisite: NATI 1006 or by permission of instructor.

2696NATI.3223.A
Native Env. Ethics & Ecology
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH04:00PM-05:20PMHCH.200
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Examines traditional and contemporary environmental values and practices of Indigenous peoples in North America. Considers the impact of Western values, practices, and ecological theories on Indigenous peoples and their environments. Particular attention will be given to the ways in which traditional environmental ethics remain viable in contemporary societies.

2700NATI.3813.A
Native Cult.Identity&Cult.Surv
Chrisjohn, RolandT TH05:30PM-06:50PMHCH.200
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Considers cultural identity and survival within the context of inequality (power, wealth and status). Focuses on the ways in which Native language, group solidarity and community offer cultural completeness, acting as barriers to assimilation. Historic and contemporary Native cultures are presented as dynamic and flexible. Prerequisite NATI 1006 or SOCI 1006.

3443NATI.3913.A
Native People & The Law II
Nicholas, GraydonM W04:00PM-05:20PMHCH.5
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An analysis of court decisions affecting questions of the status of Native peoples, Aboriginal rights, family law, treaty rights, and social relations in Canada and the United States. Prerequisite: NATI 3903.

2507PHIL.1023.A
Intro to Philosophy II
Gilbert-Walsh, JamesT TH10:00AM-11:20AMGMH.304
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[1. Introductory]A continuation of the survey of developments in western philosophy, through lecture, reading of original sources, and discussion, from the early modern period to contemporary discussion. Focus: rationalism, empiricism, idealism, and the reactions these provoked. This course has no prerequisite.

2509PHIL.1043.A
Free Will: An Intro. to Phil.
Stapleford, ScottT TH01:00PM-02:20PMMMH.308
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[1. Introductory]This course is an introduction to philosophy focusing on the problem of free will. Students will be introduced to the current debate, but will also consider what the great minds of the past can tell us about the possibility or impossibility of acting freely. We will draw on both historical and contemporary sources, developing skills of philosophical analysis in connection with a single, hotly disputed topic. This course has no prerequisite.

2510PHIL.2123.A
Ancient Phil. II
Ranger, Jean-PhilippeT TH02:30PM-03:50PMGMH.205
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[2. History of Philosophy] A lecture course surveying ancient philosophy from Aristotle to Hellenistic philosophy (Epicurus, the Stoics and the Sceptics). Through readings of original sources and ancient testimony, the course analyses key questions in ancient philosophy, e.g. what can philosophy achieve? What is the nature of reality? What does it mean to live together? Prerequisites: Any two of PHIL 1013, 1023, 1033, 1043, 1053, 1063, or permission of the instructor.

2512PHIL.2233.A
Contemporary Moral Philosophy
Ranger, Jean-PhilippeT TH11:30AM-12:50PMHCH.200
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[3. Moral Philosophy] A lecture course examining a specific topic in contemporary moral philosophy. Topics vary from year to year and may include: virtue ethics, metaethics, contemporary deontology, contemporary utilitarianism, emotivism, relativism, the is-­-ought debate, and others.

2513PHIL.2513.A
Introduction to Logic
Stapleford, ScottT TH10:00AM-11:20AMMMH.307
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[5. Themes and Authors]A lecture course in which students learn how to identify and evaluate arguments drawn from a wide variety of sources. It will develop informal methods such as the identification of argument structure and informal fallacies. It will also develop formal methods that involve taking arguments in English, symbolizing them in a formal language, and evaluating strengths and weaknesses of the argument forms. Also covered are basic probability theory, inductive logic, and statistical reasoning.

2514PHIL.2543.A
Moral Psychology
Stapleford, ScottM W02:30PM-03:50PMMMH.202
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[5. Themes and Authors]Are moral judgements grounded in emotion or reason? Under what conditions are people morally responsible? Why should I be moral? Are all moral decisions motivated by self-interest? Do moral reasons depend on desires? How does virtue relate to moral motivation? These questions are central to moral psychology. The course presupposes no background in philosophy and may be of interest to students in psychology and the life sciences, as well as philosophy. This course will not count toward credits in Psychology (i.e. a Major). Prerequisites: none.

2515PHIL.3623.A
Hegel
Gilbert-Walsh, JamesT TH08:30AM-09:50AMHCH.200
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[5. Themes and Authors]This course will involve a careful study of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit, focusing primarily on the relationships between theory and practice, and truth and history. Prerequisite: PHIL 2153 or 2163 or permission of the instructor.

2817POLS.1013.A
Law, Power, and Politics
Horgan, GerardT TH10:00AM-11:20AMECH.120
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[1. Introductory]This course is an introduction to the study of politics. It has two objectives. The first is to give students a sense of the meaning and importance of politics. The second is to study a number of the concepts essential to the study of contemporary politics: the state, sovereignty, legitimacy and authority, law, power, equality, democracy, nationality, freedom and citizenship are typically covered. The specific content and readings used vary from section to section.

2818POLS.1103.C
Canadian Government
Malcolmson, PatrickM W F11:30AM-12:20PMMMH.308
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[1. Introductory]This course provides an introduction to the concepts of the regime, authority, the rule of law, citizenship, and political obligation. It does so through a consideration of the institutions of Canadian government and covers the following topics: the framing of the constitution, federalism, parliamentary government, the Charter of Rights, the judiciary, political parties, public opinion, interest groups, and constitutional reform.

2822POLS.1603.C
Global Politics
Horgan, GerardT TH01:00PM-02:20PMECH.120
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[1. Introductory]This course provides an introduction to the concepts of nation and state, sovereignty, forms of government, and political conflict. It does so through consideration of issues in world politics, such as human rights and social justice, ecological imbalance, economic inequalities, war, global governmental institutions and organizations.

2821POLS.1603.D
Global Politics
Masciulli, JosephM W04:00PM-05:20PMJDH.G2
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[1. Introductory]This course provides an introduction to the concepts of nation and state, sovereignty, forms of government, and political conflict. It does so through consideration of issues in world politics, such as human rights and social justice, ecological imbalance, economic inequalities, war, global governmental institutions and organizations.

2823POLS.2103.A
Canadian Constitutional Pol.
Malone, KevinM W04:00PM-05:20PMJDH.G5
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[2. Canadian Government and Politics]This course will examine fundamental disagreements at the core of the Canadian polity that have plagued constitutional debate since its creation. Special attention is paid to the constitutional implications of conflicting conceptions of individual, provincial, ethno-linguistic, and multi-national equality.

2824POLS.2313.A
Comp Pol Developing World
Horgan, GerardT TH04:00PM-05:20PMGMH.304
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[3. Comparative Government and Politics]This course introduces students to the comparative study of governments in the developing world. It focuses on such issues as the politics of development, modernization, and the interplay of political and social forces in selected developing nations. Prerequisite: 3 credits in Political Science.

2826POLS.2623.A
International Relations II
Narine, ShaunM W F12:30PM-01:20PMMMH.203
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[4. International Relations and Foreign Policy]This course introduces students to the critical and non-mainstream variants of International Relations (IR) theory. These include Marxism, Gramscianism, feminist theories of IR, and other forms of critical theory. These theories are illustrated and developed through the use of case studies and examinations of the institutions and structures of the international system. They are also contrasted with mainstream IR theories. Prerequisite: POLS 1013 or permission of the instructor.

2780POLS.3306.A2
U.S. Government and Politics
Malcolmson, PatrickT TH11:30AM-12:50PMMMH.307
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[3. Comparative Government and Politics] This course examines the national political institutions of the United States of America - Congress, the Presidency, the Supreme Court, and the federal bureaucracy. Political parties, interest groups, elections, and the role of the media will also be studied. Issues surrounding the modern presidency, as well as those involving social and moral issues.

2828POLS.3313.A
U.S. Foreign Policy
Narine, ShaunW F09:00AM-10:20AMHCH.200
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[4. International Relations and Foreign Policy]This course examines the foreign policy of the United States of America. It examines the roles of the Presidency, bureaucracy, and Congress in the making of foreign policy. The history of American foreign policy will be studied to contextualize present foreign policy and likely future scenarios. The impact of U.S. economic policy in an era of globalization will be explored. Central to the course will be an investigation of the relationship of the U.S. to other major powers and to international institutions.

2831POLS.3613.A2
Model United Nations
McAnany, StephanieW07:00PM-09:50PMMMH.201
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[4. International Relations and Foreign Policy]This course will prepare students for participation in a Model United Nations, either Canadian or American sponsored. In a model UN simulation, students represent an assigned country's foreign policy on assigned issues on the UN agenda. The course will begin with an examination of the UN and its procedures. Subsequent topics will include researching the assigned UN issues and the assigned country's policy on them; preparation of working papers and motions, and strategies for effective conference participation. Fund raising for the trip required: half credit course, but meets first and second terms; limited enrolment.

2798PSYC.1013.E
Intro. to Psychology I
Claybourn, MarvinT TH11:30AM-12:50PMJDH.G1
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, history of psychology, brain and behaviour, sensation and perception, learning, memory, and cognition.

2805PSYC.1013.F
Intro. to Psychology I
Bourque, WendyM W F11:30AM-12:20PMBMH.202
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, history of psychology, brain and behaviour, sensation and perception, learning, memory, and cognition.

2807PSYC.1013.G
Intro. to Psychology I
Bourque, WendyM W F01:30PM-02:20PMBMH.202
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, history of psychology, brain and behaviour, sensation and perception, learning, memory, and cognition.

2808PSYC.1013.H
Intro. to Psychology I
Gunn, CarlaM W F10:30AM-11:20AMMMH.203
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, history of psychology, brain and behaviour, sensation and perception, learning, memory, and cognition.

2852PSYC.1023.D
Intro. to Psychology II
Gunn, CarlaM W F11:30AM-12:20PMMMH.203
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, developmental psychology, intelligence and creativity, personality, abnormal behaviour and therapy, social psychology, and applied topics.

2854PSYC.1023.E
Intro. to Psychology II
Randall, HilaryM W F01:30PM-02:20PMJDH.G2
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, developmental psychology, intelligence and creativity, personality, abnormal behaviour and therapy, social psychology, and applied topics.

2856PSYC.1023.F
Intro. to Psychology II
Gunn, CarlaT TH01:00PM-02:20PMMMH.203
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, developmental psychology, intelligence and creativity, personality, abnormal behaviour and therapy, social psychology, and applied topics.

2859PSYC.1023.G
Intro. to Psychology II
Randall, HilaryM W F10:30AM-11:20AMECH.103
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This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, developmental psychology, intelligence and creativity, personality, abnormal behaviour and therapy, social psychology, and applied topics.

2861PSYC.2013.C
Introduction to Statistics
Claybourn, MarvinT TH02:30PM-03:50PMJDH.G2
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This course focuses on statistics used by psychologists to describe and analyze research data. Course content will include a comprehensive coverage of descriptive statistics and an introduction to inferential statistics and hypothesis testing procedures. Students must take 2013 in their second year.

2863PSYC.2013.D
Introduction to Statistics
Prior, SuzanneM W02:30PM-03:50PMJDH.G2
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This course focuses on statistics used by psychologists to describe and analyze research data. Course content will include a comprehensive coverage of descriptive statistics and an introduction to inferential statistics and hypothesis testing procedures. Students must take 2013 in their second year.

2866PSYC.2013.E
Introduction to Statistics
Prior, SuzanneT TH08:30AM-09:50AMJDH.205
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This course focuses on statistics used by psychologists to describe and analyze research data. Course content will include a comprehensive coverage of descriptive statistics and an introduction to inferential statistics and hypothesis testing procedures. Students must take 2013 in their second year.

2867PSYC.2023.C
Intro to Research Methods
Higgins, NancyT TH10:00AM-11:20AMECH.G11
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This course focuses on methods used by psychologists to conduct research. Course content will include comprehensive coverage of the scientific method, the logic of experimental design, ethics, and report writing. In addition, students will be required to write research papers and may be asked to design and/or conduct their own research projects. Students must take 2023 in their second year.

2868PSYC.2023.D
Intro to Research Methods
Bourque, WendyW F09:00AM-10:20AMBMH.202
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This course focuses on methods used by psychologists to conduct research. Course content will include comprehensive coverage of the scientific method, the logic of experimental design, ethics, and report writing. In addition, students will be required to write research papers and may be asked to design and/or conduct their own research projects. Students must take 2023 in their second year.

2869PSYC.2113.B
Sensation
Fraser, IanM02:30PM-05:20PMJDH.G1
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An introduction to the study of sensation. The emphasis will be on vision and hearing. The course will begin with an examination of the stimuli and the structure and function of the receptors. Other topics will include the psychophysical methods, sensory scaling, and a survey of data on several senses. These topics can be varied to suit the interests of the students.

2870PSYC.2153.B
Biological Psychology
Bancroft, TylerT TH10:00AM-11:20AMJDH.G2
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This course provides a general introduction to the physiological processes that underlie selected behaviours. Understanding of these biological processes is fundamental to many areas of psychology, including addictive behaviours and the relationship between stress and health.

2872PSYC.2213.A
Principles of Learning
Thomson, SandraM W F10:30AM-11:20AMJDH.G5
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An introduction to the principles of respondent and operant conditioning. In addition to the basic learning paradigms, various conditioning phenomena such as reinforcement schedules, generalization, discrimination, stimulus control, positive reinforcement, and aversive control will be studied with reference to human and animal research.

2874PSYC.2233.B
Psychology and the Law
Fraser, IanW02:30PM-05:20PMJDH.G1
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Psychology has a bearing on most aspects of the legal process. Increasingly, psychologists are being asked to share their knowledge with those in the judicial system. Topics may include: the reliability of eyewitness testimony, police interview techniques, the use of mug shots, and the use of line-up procedures.

2876PSYC.2253.A
Psychology of Personal Growth
Korotkov, DavidT TH10:00AM-11:20AMJDH.G1
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This course is concerned with the growth and development of a healthy person. Topics to be covered may include concepts of identity, authenticity, self-awareness, and happiness. Students will be encouraged to use psychological theory to develop a deeper understanding of themselves as healthy persons.

2877PSYC.2253.B
Psychology of Personal Growth
Korotkov, DavidT TH01:00PM-02:20PMJDH.G2
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This course is concerned with the growth and development of a healthy person. Topics to be covered may include concepts of identity, authenticity, self-awareness, and happiness. Students will be encouraged to use psychological theory to develop a deeper understanding of themselves as healthy persons.

2879PSYC.2263.B
Cognitive Psychology
Thomson, SandraM W F11:30AM-12:20PMJDH.G5
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This course will introduce students to current theories of human mental processes and the methods used to study them. Topics may include attention, memory, language comprehension and production, concepts, imagery, judgment, decision-making, and problem solving.

2880PSYC.2313.A
Personality Psychology
Perunovic, MihailoT TH02:30PM-03:50PMJDH.G1
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Introduction to the nature, study, and conceptualization of personality. Historical and contemporary theoretical perspectives of personality will be critically examined, and applications will be discussed.

2881PSYC.2313.B
Personality Psychology
Perunovic, MihailoT TH01:00PM-02:20PMJDH.G5
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Introduction to the nature, study, and conceptualization of personality. Historical and contemporary theoretical perspectives of personality will be critically examined, and applications will be discussed.

2882PSYC.2413.C
Social Psychology
Perunovic, MihailoM W02:30PM-03:50PMECH.103
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This course will review a variety of topics within social psychology including social cognition and social perception, attitudes and attitude change, understanding the self, interpersonal attraction, persuasion, conformity, prejudice, aggression, and altruism.

2883PSYC.2413.D
Social Psychology
Korotkov, DavidM W F12:30PM-01:20PMECH.103
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This course will review a variety of topics within social psychology including social cognition and social perception, attitudes and attitude change, understanding the self, interpersonal attraction, persuasion, conformity, prejudice, aggression, and altruism.

2884PSYC.2613.C
Developmental: Phys &Emotional
Randall, HilaryT TH08:30AM-09:50AMJDH.G1
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This course will cover various aspects of development including prenatal development, physical development from birth through puberty, motor development, emotional development, and the development of a sense of self and identity.

2885PSYC.2623.B
Developmental: Cognitive & Soc
Miller, BarryM W F01:30PM-02:20PMJDH.G1
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This course will cover age-related changes in language and cognition as well as the development of gender roles and schemas, moral development, peer relations, and the influence of such factors as families and the media.

2887PSYC.2643.C
Abnormal Psychology
Bowes, AndreaM W F11:30AM-12:20PMJDH.G2
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This course examines issues in the diagnosis and treatment of the most common psychological disorders in adulthood. Students are introduced to the history of psychopathology, from primitive to modern times, which traces the development of biological, psychodynamic, behavioural, cognitive, and sociocultural models of abnormality. Possible topics include: anxiety disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenia, and personality disorders.

2889PSYC.3153.A
Adv. Biol. Bases of Psyc
Bancroft, TylerT TH01:00PM-02:20PMGMH.301
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This course continues the exploration of the biological basis of behaviour. The material covered in this course is relevant to many areas of psychology. The course content will build directly from PSYC 2153 and cover biological bases of language, and sensation and perception, learning and memory, psychological disorders, and sleep and consciousness. Prerequisite: PSYC 2153.

2891PSYC.3183.A
Sexuality and Diversity
Stelzl, MonikaW02:30PM-05:20PMJDH.G5
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This course will encourage students to critically examine the diverse factors that contribute to how sexuality is conceptualised and represented. Multiple perspectives, including cultural, psychosocial, and biological, will be considered. Possible topics include sexual orientation, varieties in sexual development and expression, attraction, and psychological perspectives on sex as a commodity. Prerequisites: PSYC 2183.

2892PSYC.3413.A
Advanced Social Psychology
Higgins, NancyT TH01:00PM-02:20PMECH.G11
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This course provides exposure to major current issues in the study of social behaviour. Prerequisite: PSYC 2413.

2893PSYC.3713.A
Madness and Medicine
Nicholson, IanM02:30PM-05:20PMJDH.G5
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This course examines the medicalization of madness and its social, scientific, and political significance. The basic tenets of the biomedical approach to abnormality will be reviewed along with the psychiatric classification system of mental disorders. In addition to considering the therapeutic efficacy and scientific merit of this approach, the course will also explore the sociopolitical dimensions of madness and psychiatry's links to the pharmaceutical and insurance industries. Prerequisite: PSYC 2643 Abnormal Psychology or permission of the instructor.

2895PSYC.3733.A
Developmental Psycholinguistic
Prior, SuzanneT TH11:30AM-12:50PMECH.223
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This course examines current theories and research on the development of language in children. Topics may include the nature of language, the biological basis of language development, the development of different components of language (phonology, semantics, syntax, pragmatics), language development in special populations, and childhood bilingualism. Prerequisites: PSYC 2613 and 2623, or permission of the instructor.

2897PSYC.3943.A
Advanced Research
Bancroft, TylerT TH08:30AM-09:50AMECH.223
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This course is designed to prepare students for writing an honours thesis and for overall participation in the honours programme. The course will focus primarily on the written and presentational aspects of a psychological research project, the peer review process, and on various ethical considerations when conducting a study. Discussion of various experimental and non-experimental methods will be embedded within the primary course content. Prerequisites: PSYC 2013, PSYC 2023, and PSYC 3933.

2898PSYC.4263.A
Seminar in Cognitive Psyc
Thomson, SandraM W02:30PM-03:50PMMMH.201
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Advanced exploration of theoretical and empirical work in one or more areas of cognitive psychology. Prerequisites: PSYC 2013, 2023 and 2263, or permission of the instructor.

2900PSYC.4423.A
Seminar in Social Psychology
Higgins, NancyT TH04:00PM-05:20PMECH.124
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Exploration of theoretical and empirical work in one or more areas of social psychology. Prerequisites: PSYC 2013, 2023, 2413 or permission of the instructor.

2901PSYC.4493.B
Seminar: Men and Masculinity
Nicholson, IanT02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.204
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This course critically explores the contemporary male and masculine roles in 21st century society. The course is designed to acquaint students with current understandings of men from the psychological perspective and to help students better understand themselves or a male in their lives. Topics may include father-son relationships, mother-son relationships, fathering, relationships with men, relationships with women, husbanding, emotional expressiveness, aggression and war, sexuality, gender differences, work, solitude, sports and rites of passage. No prerequisite.

2733PSYC.4996.A2
Honours Thesis
Stelzl, MonikaM W F12:30PM-01:20PMECH.320
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The student will conduct an individual research project with guidance from the Department. Some classes will be held to acquaint Honours candidates with problems in research design. PSYC 2013, 2023, 3933 and 3943 are prerequisites. A minimum grade of B is required in each of these courses.

2709RELG.1006.A2
Intro to Religious Studies
Simon, DerekM W F10:30AM-11:20AMGMH.207
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[I. Introductory Course]A thematic, issues-oriented introduction to the study of religions. Some of the themes and issues explored may include social crisis and renewal, authority and power, sexual diversity, conflict and peace, evil and suffering, death and after death, food and music, among others. By means of these themes, students develop an active appreciation of diverse religious traditions and gain the tools to think critically about them.

2716RELG.1006.B2
Intro to Religious Studies
Simon, DerekT TH01:00PM-02:20PMGMH.204
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[I. Introductory Course]A thematic, issues-oriented introduction to the study of religions. Some of the themes and issues explored may include social crisis and renewal, authority and power, sexual diversity, conflict and peace, evil and suffering, death and after death, food and music, among others. By means of these themes, students develop an active appreciation of diverse religious traditions and gain the tools to think critically about them.

2722RELG.1006.C2
Intro to Religious Studies
Dunham, ScottW F09:00AM-10:20AMECH.103
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[I. Introductory Course]A thematic, issues-oriented introduction to the study of religions. Some of the themes and issues explored may include social crisis and renewal, authority and power, sexual diversity, conflict and peace, evil and suffering, death and after death, food and music, among others. By means of these themes, students develop an active appreciation of diverse religious traditions and gain the tools to think critically about them.

2728RELG.2293.A
Religion & Sexuality
Simon, DerekM W02:30PM-03:50PMECH.G14
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[II. Intermediate and Advanced Courses|1. Multi-Religious Courses]An examination of the understanding of the nature of human sexuality with specific reference to religious and theological frameworks. Issues studied may include sexuality as foundational in personal dignity and integrity, marriage, relationality, communication, the commodification of sexuality, systematic abuses and neglect of sexuality.

2730RELG.3323.A
Book of Isaiah
McDonald, DenysW07:00PM-09:50PMMMH.204
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[II. Intermediate and Advanced Courses|2. Tradition-Specific Courses]This course will study the book of Isaiah as an example of prophetic literature. It will treat such questions as the authorship, dating, unity, background, and theology of the book. Particular passages will be singled out for more detailed study.

2734RELG.4023.A
RS: Scope and Methods
Simon, DerekM W04:00PM-05:20PMECH.G14
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[III. Specialized Courses|4. Majors and Honours Required Seminars]An in-depth analysis of selected issues in Religious Studies, focusing on the distinctive concerns of the discipline and the furthering of research skills appropriate to it. The course fosters reflection on the variety of methods used in Religious Studies, mindful of the need of senior students to integrate their four years of learning in the discipline. Honours students are normally required to take this course in their third year, Majors students in their fourth year, of full-time study.

3111SCWK.5006.A
Prep. for Prof. Scwk. Practice
Baldwin, CliveW09:00AM-12:00PMBMH.204
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[Post-Degree Courses]The purpose of this course is the development of personal and professional skills that prepare students for professional critical social work practice. This includes a focus on increasing self-awareness and mindfulness as important knowledge for practice; an emphasis on developing skills for experiential learning; an orientation to the values and characteristics of a competent social work professional and social work practice; and the development of beginning competency in generic crisis intervention theory and skills common to all levels of social work practice. Additionally, the course will prepare students for their initial field education experience through the clarification of expectations of students in a field placement that includes an emphasis on preparation of learning contracts.

3111SCWK.5006.A
Prep. for Prof. Scwk. Practice
Baldwin, CliveF09:00AM-12:00PMBMH.204
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[Post-Degree Courses]The purpose of this course is the development of personal and professional skills that prepare students for professional critical social work practice. This includes a focus on increasing self-awareness and mindfulness as important knowledge for practice; an emphasis on developing skills for experiential learning; an orientation to the values and characteristics of a competent social work professional and social work practice; and the development of beginning competency in generic crisis intervention theory and skills common to all levels of social work practice. Additionally, the course will prepare students for their initial field education experience through the clarification of expectations of students in a field placement that includes an emphasis on preparation of learning contracts.

3112SCWK.5006.B
Prep. for Prof. Scwk. Practice
Staff, W09:00AM-12:00PMBMH.108
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[Post-Degree Courses]The purpose of this course is the development of personal and professional skills that prepare students for professional critical social work practice. This includes a focus on increasing self-awareness and mindfulness as important knowledge for practice; an emphasis on developing skills for experiential learning; an orientation to the values and characteristics of a competent social work professional and social work practice; and the development of beginning competency in generic crisis intervention theory and skills common to all levels of social work practice. Additionally, the course will prepare students for their initial field education experience through the clarification of expectations of students in a field placement that includes an emphasis on preparation of learning contracts.

3112SCWK.5006.B
Prep. for Prof. Scwk. Practice
Staff, F09:00AM-12:00PMBMH.108
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[Post-Degree Courses]The purpose of this course is the development of personal and professional skills that prepare students for professional critical social work practice. This includes a focus on increasing self-awareness and mindfulness as important knowledge for practice; an emphasis on developing skills for experiential learning; an orientation to the values and characteristics of a competent social work professional and social work practice; and the development of beginning competency in generic crisis intervention theory and skills common to all levels of social work practice. Additionally, the course will prepare students for their initial field education experience through the clarification of expectations of students in a field placement that includes an emphasis on preparation of learning contracts.

3124SCWK.5036.MM2
Theory for Social Work Pract.I
Dupre, Marilyn-TBA.TBA
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[Post-Degree Courses]This is a mandatory course for all post-degree BSW students. A central assumption of this course is that social work as a profession needs to be self-critical in order to guard against continuing and increasing oppression experienced by members of various groups as they access social welfare programmes and social work intervention. Therefore a critical analysis of social welfare, social services and social work practice (primarily in the Canadian context) will be a central focus in the course.

3113SCWK.5046.A
Theory for Soc.Work Pract.II
Hotte, JenniT TH09:00AM-12:00PMBMH.204
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[Post-Degree Courses]This is a mandatory course for all post-degree BSW students. The course provides a base for professional practice by introducing the values and ethics of the profession, and theories relevant to social work practice with individuals, groups, and communities. Knowledge drawn from the social sciences and other disciplines will be integrated with methods of intervention. Prerequisites: SCWK 5036.

3114SCWK.5046.B
Theory for Soc.Work Pract.II
Weeks, MurrayT TH09:00AM-12:00PMBMH.108
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[Post-Degree Courses]This is a mandatory course for all post-degree BSW students. The course provides a base for professional practice by introducing the values and ethics of the profession, and theories relevant to social work practice with individuals, groups, and communities. Knowledge drawn from the social sciences and other disciplines will be integrated with methods of intervention. Prerequisites: SCWK 5036.

3117SCWK.5313.A
Social Policy in Can. Context
Dudziak, SuzanneW01:30PM-04:30PMBMH.204
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[Post-Degree Courses]Concepts in policy planning are studied, along with an examination of the process of planned change from problem identification to programming. Consideration will be given to the political arena, the bureaucracy and roles of the politician, and the public servant. Three hours per week.

3118SCWK.5313.B
Social Policy in Can. Context
Jamal, AamirW01:30PM-04:30PMBMH.204
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[Post-Degree Courses]Concepts in policy planning are studied, along with an examination of the process of planned change from problem identification to programming. Consideration will be given to the political arena, the bureaucracy and roles of the politician, and the public servant. Three hours per week.

3353SCWK.5323.A
Social Policy-Issues & Global
Jamal, AamirT01:30PM-04:30PMBMH.204
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[Post-Degree Courses]This course will provide an opportunity for students to develop a beginning awareness, sensitivity, and understanding of the scope and impact of global or international issues on the lives of people in other parts of the world and our own lives, as well as on social policies and social work practice at all levels. As well, this course will explore the efforts of organizations (at the local, national, and international levels) which address international concerns.

3354SCWK.5323.B
Social Policy-Issues & Global
Jamal, AamirM01:30PM-04:30PMBMH.108
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[Post-Degree Courses]This course will provide an opportunity for students to develop a beginning awareness, sensitivity, and understanding of the scope and impact of global or international issues on the lives of people in other parts of the world and our own lives, as well as on social policies and social work practice at all levels. As well, this course will explore the efforts of organizations (at the local, national, and international levels) which address international concerns.

2927SOCI.1006.A2
Introduction to Sociology
Allain, KristiM W F10:30AM-11:20AMJDH.G2
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

2930SOCI.1006.B2
Introduction to Sociology
Fredericks, ErinM W F11:30AM-12:20PMECH.120
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

2932SOCI.1006.C2
Introduction to Sociology
Allain, KristiM W F12:30PM-01:20PMMMH.308
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

2934SOCI.1006.D2
Introduction to Sociology
Luke, AlisonM W02:30PM-03:50PMMMH.203
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

2937SOCI.1006.E2
Introduction to Sociology
Caliskan, GulhanimT TH10:00AM-11:20AMBMH.103
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

2939SOCI.1006.F2
Introduction to Sociology
McCoy, RobertT TH11:30AM-12:50PMJDH.G2
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A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

2991SOCI.2013.B
Research Design
Staff, M W F12:30PM-01:20PMMMH.202
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An introduction to the main research approaches used in sociology. The course includes practical experience in developing a research program by considering research question development, research design, methods of data collection, research ethics and data analysis. Of particular interest are the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches.

2925SOCI.2116.A2
Sociology of Atlantic Canada
Curtis Maillet, DonnaW F09:00AM-10:20AMMMH.202
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This course is designed as an introduction to the sociological study of Atlantic Canada. The first term focuses on the development of the Maritimes and Newfoundland from mercantile societies to under-developed regions within the centralized Canadian economy. The second term focuses on the contemporary structure, problems, and issues of Atlantic Canadian society.

2990SOCI.2123.A
Sociology of Globalization
Caliskan, GulhanimT TH02:30PM-03:50PMECH.G11
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Introduction to Sociology of Globalization explores social conditions characterized by global economic, political, cultural, and environmental interconnections and flows that cross existing political borders. Therefore, it challenges our existing conceptualization of an international world of borders and nation states. The course explores the concept of globalization and its relevance to our lives. Types of empirical topics covered include contemporary global inequalities; environmental problems; transnational communities and families; transnational migration; the effect of globalization on gender, race, ethnicity, and religion; transnational social movements; and the women's movement.

2989SOCI.2313.B
Deviance
Hersey, CorinneT TH08:30AM-09:50AMJDH.G6
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This course reviews theory and research with a focus on the social basis of deviance, deviance construction, and the consequences of social reactions to selected forms of deviance.

2923SOCI.2416.A2
Inequality in Society
Fleming, MichaelT TH08:30AM-09:50AMBMH.101
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This course explores existing patterns of social inequality and debates concerning the possibility and desirability of greater equality. Taking a theoretical and historical focus, this course examines the changing nature of inequality in contemporary Canadian society in the context of globalization. Throughout, we develop our understanding of how different forms of inequality - particularly social class, gender and race - intersect. One section of the course may have a service learning requirement, where students engage in volunteer work in the community, and then reflect upon their experiences through reading, writing, and discussion.

2987SOCI.2513.A
Sociology of Communication
Campbell, MargaretM W F10:30AM-11:20AMECH.120
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This course considers the mass media, (principally print and electronic), its place in, and impact upon Canadian society. Various perspectives and related research are considered with respect to the control and ownership of the media, the social organization of the production of news, facts, statistics, and other messages; and the themes expressed in popular culture as conveyed by the media. Underlying concerns are the social construction of what-is-taken-to-be reality and the language that is used in the conveying of messages.

2986SOCI.2613.A
Sociology of Gender
Fredericks, ErinM W02:30PM-03:50PMBMH.202
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This course focuses on particular aspects of the social processes that shape, and are shaped by female and male social roles such as gender and power, gender and social structures of work, and feminist social movements.

3057SOCI.2643.A
Political Economy of Women
Solati, FaribaT TH11:30AM-12:50PMGMH.304
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This is a seminar course examining selected topics on the political economy of women. Potential topics include women as paid workers, domestic labour, and women and poverty.

2985SOCI.2653.A
Sociology of Health
Hersey, CorinneT TH11:30AM-12:50PMECH.G12
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This course provides an introduction to sociology of health and illness. We will analyze the social construction of medical knowledge, the dominant mode of understanding health and illness in our society; experiences of health and illness; the social foundations of health inequalities-how and why patterns of health, illness and mortality reflect class, gender, sexuality, racial and ethnic divisions; the formal institutions that define and manage health and health care; and the consequences of medicalization.

3003SOCI.3023.A
Contemporary Soci. Theory
Kelly, ColmT TH04:00PM-05:20PMECH.223
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A study of contemporary developments in sociological theory, focusing on major trends, their interrelationships, and controversies. Prerequisite: SOCI 2033.

2984SOCI.3023.B
Contemporary Soci. Theory
Kelly, ColmT TH10:00AM-11:20AMJDH.205
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A study of contemporary developments in sociological theory, focusing on major trends, their interrelationships, and controversies. Prerequisite: SOCI 2033.

2982SOCI.3033.A
Research Strategies
Kelly, ColmW F09:00AM-10:20AMECH.G11
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This course helps students learn what original research entails from its initial conception to its completion. It highlights the techniques and strategies successful researchers use to develop their research questions; select an appropriate research design and data collection method(s); meet university research ethics requirements; ensure the research is socially relevant and completed in a timely manner. Students are expected to design a research project and write a proposal outlining their plans. This exercise allows students to gain an appreciation of the research design process and the components of research. For some students the proposal will be the initial work towards an honours thesis; for others it will be a model for the preparation and planning of research in other courses or outside academia. After taking the course students should feel prepared to undertake research projects in any academic, government, research, or policy setting.

2981SOCI.3313.A
Sociology of Law
Sanford, StephanieT07:00PM-09:50PMMMH.202
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This course critically examines law from various sociological perspectives, with particular reference to Canada. The course is designed to cover sociological jurisprudence and selected theories of law, as they relate to family, administrative, labour, criminal and other types of law. Prerequisite: SOCI 2313.

2971SOCI.3563.A
Sociology of Music
Weeks, PeterM W04:00PM-05:20PMECH.G12
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This course combines a number of macro- and micro-sociological perspectives on music. The former refers to the wider socio-cultural context in which music is produced, distributed, and listened to. It includes the social functions and uses of music ranging from rituals and ceremonies to its political-economic organization in cultural industries. Forms of music, such as the functional harmony vs. the Afro-American traditons, area related to forms of society. Micro perspectives analyze how performers create and make music together in terms of the interaction among musicians, audience, and conductor. The practices of improvisation and maintaining synchrony will be examined principally in both classical and jazz contexts. Prerequisite: permission of the course instructor or the Director of the Centre for Musical Arts, UNB.

2970SOCI.3723.A
Special Topics: Exercise
Allain, KristiM W02:30PM-03:50PMGMH.204
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The content of this course changes from year to year to reflect the special strengths of faculty and particular needs of students.

2969SOCI.4013.C
Senior Seminar
Hersey, CorinneT02:30PM-05:20PMMMH.102
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The senior seminar is a one-semester course, required for a Major degree in sociology, which is to be taken in the final year of study. The course is organized around substantive issues, with different sections devoted to different topics. The issues are addressed as puzzles or lines of inquiry that explore current concerns. Students are expected to bring the knowledge they have acquired of the competing traditions of sociological inquiry to bear on the theme. This course will be conducted as a seminar, with students taking responsibility for researching, presenting, and discussing material. Regular attendance and active participation will be emphasized. Enrolment limited to approximately 15 students in each section.

2829SPAN.1006.A2
Beginning Spanish
Basabe, OmarM W F12:30PM-01:20PMECH.G14
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The beginner's course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of the language. It represents the basic level in the learning of Spanish. Teaching methods and texts will vary from year to year and from instructor to instructor. The aims of the course are the acquisition of (1) listening comprehension, (2) basic vocabulary suitable for everyday conversations, (3) simple grammatical structures, and (4) a knowledge of reading and writing techniques. The basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) are emphasized. In addition, each instructor will introduce the students to selected elements of Hispanic Culture.

2833SPAN.1006.B2
Beginning Spanish
Basabe, OmarM W F01:30PM-02:20PMECH.G14
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The beginner's course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of the language. It represents the basic level in the learning of Spanish. Teaching methods and texts will vary from year to year and from instructor to instructor. The aims of the course are the acquisition of (1) listening comprehension, (2) basic vocabulary suitable for everyday conversations, (3) simple grammatical structures, and (4) a knowledge of reading and writing techniques. The basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) are emphasized. In addition, each instructor will introduce the students to selected elements of Hispanic Culture.

2837SPAN.1006.C2
Beginning Spanish
Sainz, HaydeeM W F10:30AM-11:20AMECH.223
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The beginner's course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of the language. It represents the basic level in the learning of Spanish. Teaching methods and texts will vary from year to year and from instructor to instructor. The aims of the course are the acquisition of (1) listening comprehension, (2) basic vocabulary suitable for everyday conversations, (3) simple grammatical structures, and (4) a knowledge of reading and writing techniques. The basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) are emphasized. In addition, each instructor will introduce the students to selected elements of Hispanic Culture.

2840SPAN.1006.D2
Beginning Spanish
Sainz, HaydeeM W F11:30AM-12:20PMECH.223
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The beginner's course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of the language. It represents the basic level in the learning of Spanish. Teaching methods and texts will vary from year to year and from instructor to instructor. The aims of the course are the acquisition of (1) listening comprehension, (2) basic vocabulary suitable for everyday conversations, (3) simple grammatical structures, and (4) a knowledge of reading and writing techniques. The basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) are emphasized. In addition, each instructor will introduce the students to selected elements of Hispanic Culture.

2996SPAN.2023.A
Intermediate Spanish II
Terzioska, JasminaM W F11:30AM-12:20PMECH.G14
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This course is the continuation of Intermediate Grammar I or its equivalent. It begins with a review of the indicative mood and then moves on to coverage of the subjunctive mood. This course will stress conversation, oral exercises, and oral presentations. Written assignments will improve the accuracy of the grammatical structures learned in the oral part of the course. Plays will sometimes be used as a part of the learning language process.

2995SPAN.2423.A
Oral Intense II
Sainz, HaydeeT TH11:30AM-02:20PMECH.320
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This course is designed as a follow up to SPAN 2413 and will provide intense oral practice in Spanish. In addition to traditional oral practices, there will be small discussion groups and regular access to sound and video files on the WWW. News items, current newspapers, radio and television news will be accessed regularly on the WWW and specific news items will be followed in some detail. Prerequisite: SPAN 2413 or equivalent.

3002SPAN.3323.A
Adv. Reading 2: Spanish Americ
Terzioska, JasminaM W02:30PM-03:50PMECH.124
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Students will develop their reading and analyses skills by on in-depth reading of selected Latin American texts and in addition, they will improve their oral fluency studying the rhythms of Latin American poetry. Oral and written expositions on specific topics which arise from their textual analyses will reinforce the accuracy of the use of Spanish language in all its forms.

2979SPAN.3523.A
Advanced Grammar II
Basabe, OmarW F09:00AM-10:20AMECH.G14
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This course is a continuation of Advanced Grammar I. As in the first course, this one also aims to build on the knowledge and communicative skills that students have previously acquired with regards to the subjunctive tense. During the course of the semester, in-class activities will emphasize the practice of the past subjunctive tenses. Some structural exercises and reading activities will be used; however, the course is based on communicative activities and projects that will reinforce grammar acquisition.

2978SPAN.4663.A
Don Quijote
Terzioska, JasminaM04:00PM-06:50PMECH.320
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SPAN 4663 offers a close reading in Spanish of Cervantes' modern novel Don Quijote de la Mancha. During the semester students will become familiar with the historical, literary and political contexts of the novel, explore the connections between the novel's author and its main character, study the influence of Don Quijote on other literary works, examine the concept of the 'modern novel', and reflect on the relativity of madness. Classes will involve both lectures and discussions in the target language.

2977SPAN.4823.A
Span.Amer.Lit.-Mod.to Present
Basabe, OmarM W F10:30AM-11:20AMECH.320
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This course will focus on Spanish-American literature from Modernism to the present, beginning with the literature of the Mexican Revolution Period and progressing through the literature of the Boom and post-Boom eras.

2644STS.1003.B
Science, Tech., and Society I
Wisniewski, AngelaM W F10:30AM-11:20AMMMH.308
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Science and technology are among the most powerful forces in our world today and come with a vast and complicated array of social, ethical, political, legal, and economic implications. This course introduces students to the core theories and various branches of the dynamic field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) in order to facilitate thoughtful analysis of the intertwined relations among science, technology, and society.

2647STS.1513.A
Principles of Biology II
Langmaid, WilfredT TH04:00PM-05:20PMBMH.102
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[I. Science Courses]This course examines mitosis, meiosis, and genetics. Surveys the structure, function, and evolution of the kingdoms of life. Discusses the basics of ecology, culminating in ecological interactions and the impact of humans on the planet.

2710STS.2253.A
Science & Tech. From 1543
Jenkins, JaneT TH08:30AM-09:50AMMMH.307
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Examines the transformation of civilizations around the world by technologies such as steam engines, electricity, airplanes, and nuclear bombs. Also examines the development and impact of new scientific theories of universal gravitation, evolution, genetics, and bio-engineering. Aims to understand the social, political, economic, and religious consequences of science and technology from the mid-16th century to the present.

2692STS.2503.A
Plagues and Peoples
Jenkins, JaneM W04:00PM-05:20PMMMH.308
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This course studies the impact of disease epidemics on human populations and on economic, social, intellectual, religious, and political aspects of life from ancient times to the present.

2693STS.3013.A
Controversies in Sci.& Techno.
Wisniewski, AngelaT TH10:00AM-11:20AMJDH.G5
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This course explores controversial issues involving science and technology in order to investigate the underlying dynamics of science and technology themselves since it is during controversies that the normally hidden social dimensions of techno-science become more explicit. Various controversies, such as climate change, transgenic foods, biofuels, and chemical additives in food are studied to reveal the rhetorical tools, underlying assumptions, and social, political, economic, and philosophical struggles embedded within science and technology. Pre-requisite: STS 1003.

2695STS.3043.A
Heaven and Earth
Jenkins, JaneT TH11:30AM-12:50PMMMH.106
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This course explores theories explaining the structure and material makeup of the universe from ancient times to the Scientific Revolution. Technical details of astronomy and matter theories are examined in philosophical, theological, and medical contexts. Topics include: the shift from an earth-centered to a sun-centered astronomy, medical astrology, the shift from ancient atomism to mechanistic theories of matter, and the implications of postulating empty space in the macro and micro universe.

2697STS.3103.A
Science, Tech & Society III
Wisniewski, AngelaW F09:00AM-10:20AMMMH.307
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This course further develops an integrative understanding of the core theories and various branches of the dynamic field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) through an advanced study of the theoretical roots and current trends in the discipline. Students will develop skills in critical thinking, research, as well as written and oral presentations by applying theoretical perspectives to different case studies. Perequisite: STS 2103.

Last Published: Sat Dec 16 06:05:01 2017