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Bibliography

For theorists, researchers, students, and practitioners searching for materials related to narrative, we have assembled the preliminary list of resources from a variety of disciplines.

We will eventually be adding to and organizing this list according to theme and discipline.

Abbott, H. (2002). The Cambridge introduction to narrative. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Aftel, M. (1996). The story of your life: Becoming the author of your experience. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Albright, D. (1994). Literary and psychological models of the self. In U. Neisser & R. Fivush (Eds.), The remembering self: Construction and accuracy in the self-narrative (pp. 19-40). Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Alheit, P. (1995). Biographical learning: Theoretical outline, challenges, and contradictions of a new approach in adult education. In P. Alheit, A. Bron-Wojciechowska, E. Brugger, & P. Dominice (Eds.), The biographical approach in European adult education (pp. 57-74). Vienna: Verband Wiener Voksbildung.

Atkinson, R. (1995). The gift of stories: Practical and spiritual applications of autobiography, life stories and personal mythmaking. Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey.

Atkinson, R. (1998). The life story interview. Qualitative Research Methods, Series 44. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Baldwin, C. (2005). Storycatcher: Making sense of our lives through the power and practice of story. Novato, CA: New World Library.

Bamberg, M. (1997). A constructivist approach to narrative development. In M. Bamberg (Ed.), Narrative development: Six approaches (pp. 89-132). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Bamberg, M. (2006). Biographic-narrative research, quo vadis? A critical review of “big stories” from the perspective of “small stories.” In K. Miles, C. Horrocks, N. Kelly, B. Roberts, & D. Robinson (Eds.), Narrative, memory and knowledge: Representations, aesthetics and contexts (pp. 63-79). Huddersfield, England: University of Huddersfield Press.

Bamberg, M., & Georgakopoulou, A. (2008). Small stories and a new perspective in narrative and identity analysis. Text & Talk: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Language, Discourse & Communication Studies, 28(3), 377–396.

Barrington, J. (1997). Writing the memoir: From truth to art. Portland, OR: The Eighth Mountain Press.

Barthes, R. (1988). The death of the author. In D. Lodge (Ed.), Modern criticism and theory (pp. 16-172). London: Longman Publishing. (Original work published 1968).

Basting, A. (2003). Looking back from loss: Views of the self in Alzheimer’s disease. Journal of Aging Studies, 17, 87-89.

Basting, A. (Fall 2003). Reading the story behind the story: Context and content in stories by people with dementia. Generations: The Journal of the American Society on Aging, 23(3), 25-29.

Bateson, M. C. (1990). Composing a life. New York: Plume.

Bateson, M. (2004). Narrative, adaptation, change. In W. Randall, D. Furlong, T. Poitras (Eds.). Narrative Matters 2004: The power of story in a postmodern world (pp. 24-30). [Conference Proceedings.] Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada: St. Thomas University. (Original keynote speech, Narrative Matters 2002.)

Baur, S. (1994). Confiding: A psychotherapist and her patients search for stories to live by. New York: HarperPerennial.

Bavelas, J., Coates, L., & Johnson, T. (2000). Listeners as co-narrators. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 79(6). 941-952.

Beardslee, W. (1990). Stories in the postmodern world: Orienting and disorienting. In D. Griffin (Ed.), Sacred interconnections: Postmodern spirituality, political economy, and art (pp. 163-175). Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

Becker, B. (1999). Narratives of pain in later life and conventions of storytelling. Journal of Aging Studies, 13(1), 73-87.

Becker, B. (2001). Challenging “ordinary pain”: Narratives of older people who live with pain. In G. Kenyon, P. Clark, & B. de Vries (Eds.), Narrative gerontology: Theory, research, and practice (pp. 91-112). New York: Springer.

Beike, D., Lampinen, J., & Behrend, D. (Eds.). ( 2004). The self and memory. New York: Psychology Press.

Berger, P. L. (1963). Invitation to sociology: A humanistic perspective. Garden City, NY: Anchor.

Berman, H. J. (1989). May Sarton’s journals: Attachment and separateness in later life. In Thomas L. E. (Ed.), Research on adulthood aging: The human science approach. (pp. 11-26). Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

Berman, H. J. (1994). Diaries, narrative and the self. In Interpreting the aging self: Personal journals of later life. (pp. 165-194). New York: Springer.

Berry, T. (1987). The new story: Comments on the origin, identification and transmission of values. Cross Currents, 37(2-3). 187-199.

Bickle, J. (2003). Empirical evidence for a narrative concept of self. In G. Fireman, T. McVay, Jr., & O. Flanagan (Eds.), Narrative and consciousness: Literature, psychology, and the brain (pp. 195-208). Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.

Birkerts, S. (1994). The Gutenberg Elegies: The fate of reading in an electronic age. New York: Fawcett.

Birren, J. E. (1987, May). The best of all stories. Psychology Today, 91-92.

Birren, J. E., & Dutchman, D. E. (1991). Guiding autobiography groups for older adults: Exploring the fabric of life. Baltimore, MD: The John Hopkins University Press.

Birren, J. E. (2001). Foreword. In G. Kenyon, P. Clark, & B. de Vries (Eds.), Narrative Gerontology: Theory, research, and practice (pp. vii-ix). New York: Springer.

Bluck, S. (2001). Autobiographical memories: A building block of life narratives. In G. Kenyon, P. Clark, & B. de Vries (Eds.), Narrative Gerontology: Theory, research, and practice (pp. 67-90). New York: Springer.

Bluck, S., & Alea, N. (2002). Exploring the functions of autobiographical memory: Why do I remember the autumn? In J. Webster & B. Haight (Eds.), Critical advances in reminiscence: From theory to application (pp. 61-75). New York: Springer.

Bluck, S., & Habermas, T. (2000). The life story schema. Motivation and Emotion, 24(2), 121-147.

Bohlmeijer, E. (2007). Reminiscence: Recent progress and emerging trends in conceptual and applied understanding. Reminiscence and depression in later life (pp. 29-58) (Dissertation). Amsterdam: Faculty of Psychology and Education, Vrije Universiteit.

Bohlmeijer, E., Valenkamp, M., Westerhof, G., Smit, G., & Cuijpers, P. (2005). Creative reminiscence as an early intervention for depression: Results of a pilot project. Aging & Mental Health, 9(4), 302-304.

Booth, W. (1961). The rhetoric of fiction. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press.

Booth, W. (1988). The company we keep: An ethics of fiction. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Bornat, J. (Ed.). (1994). Reminiscence reviewed: Evaluations, achievements, perspectives. Buckingham, England: Open University Press.

Bortolussi, M., & Dixon, P. (2003). Psychonarratology: Foundations for the empirical study of literature. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Brady, M. E. (1990). Redeemed from time: Learning through autobiography. Adult Education Quarterly, 41(1), 43-52.

Bridges, W. (1980). Transitions: Making sense of life’s changes. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Addison-Wesley.

Brockelman, P. (1992). The inside story: A narrative approach to religious understanding and truth. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

Brockmeier, J. (2001). From the end to the beginning: Retrospective teleology in autobiography. In J. Brockmeier & D. Carbaugh (Eds.), Narrative and identity: Studies in autobiography, self, and culture (pp. 247-280). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Brockmeier, J. (2002). Possible lives. Narrative Inquiry, 12(2), 455-66.

Brockmeier, J., & Carbaugh, D. (Eds). (2001). Narrative and identity: Studies in autobiography, self, and culture. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Brockmeier, J., & Harré, R. (2001). Narrative: Problems and promises of an alternative paradigm. In J. Brockmeier & D. Carbaugh (Eds.), Narrative and identity: Studies in autobiography, self and culture (pp. 39-58). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Brooks, P. (1985). Reading for the plot: Design and intention in narrative. New York: Vintage.

Brown, C. & Augusta-Scott, T. (2007). Narrative therapy: Making meaning, making lives. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Bruner, J. (1986). Actual minds, possible worlds. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Bruner, J. (1987). Life as narrative. Social Research, 54(1), 11-32.

Bruner, J. (1990). Acts of meaning. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Bruner, J. (1994). The “remembered” self. In U. Neisser & R. Fivush (Eds.), The remembering self: Construction and accuracy in the self narrative (pp. 41-54). Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Bruner, J. (1996). The culture of education. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Bruner, J. (1999). Narratives of aging. Journal of Aging Studies, 13(1), 7-9.

Bruner, J. (2001). Self-making and world making. In J. Brockmeier & D. Carbaugh (Eds.), Narrative and identity: Studies in autobiography, self and culture (pp. 25-37). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Bruner, J. (2002). Making stories: Law, literature, and life. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Bruner, J. (2005). The reality of fiction. McGill Journal of Education, 40(1), 55-64.

Bruner, J., & Feldman, C. (1995). Group narrative as a cultural context of autobiography. In D. Rubin (Ed.), Remembering our past: Studies in autobiographical memory (pp. 291-317). Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Bruner, J., & Kalmar, D. (1998). Narrative and metanarrative in the construction of the self. In M. Ferrari & R. Sternberg (Eds.), Self-awareness: Its nature and development (pp. 308-331). New York: Guilford.

Bruner, J., & Weisser, S. (1991). The invention of self: autobiography and its form. In D. Olson & N. Torrance (Eds.), Literacy and Orality (pp. 129-148). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Burke, K. (1941). The philosophy of literary form. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Burnside, I. (1996). Life review and reminiscence in nursing practice. In J. Birren, G. Kenyon, J. -E. Ruth, J. Schroots, & T. Svensson (Eds.), Aging and biography: Explorations in adult development (pp. 248 -264). New York: Springer.

Burnside, I. (1996). Reminiscence. In J. E. Birren (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Gerontology, Vol. 2 (pp. 399-406). San Diego, CA: Academic Press.

Butala, S. (2005). The memoirist’s quandary. McGill Journal of Education, 40(1), 43-54.

Butler, R. (1963). The life review: An interpretation of reminiscence in the aged. Psychiatry, 26, 65-76.

Butler, R. (2007). Life review. In J. E. Birren (Ed.), Encyclopedia of gerontology: Age, aging, and the aged, Vol. 1 (2nd Ed.), (pp. 67-72). San Diego, CA: Academic Press. (Original work published 1996.)

Campbell, J. (1949). The hero with a thousand faces. New York: MJF Books.

Campbell, J. (with B. Moyers). (1988). The power of myth. New York: Doubleday.

Carr, D. (1986). Time, narrative, and history. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

Casey, E. (1987). Remembering: A phenomenological study. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

Cavarero, A. (2000). Relating narratives: Storytelling and selfhood. (P. Kottman, Trans.). London: Routledge.

Chambers, T. (1996). From the ethicist’s point of view: The literary nature of ethical inquiry. Hastings Centre Report, 26(1), 25-32.

Chandler, S., & Ray, R. (2002). New meanings for old tales: A discourse-based study of reminiscence and development in later life. In J. Webster & B. Haight (Eds.), Critical advances in reminiscence work: From theory to application (pp. 76-94). New York: Springer.

Charmé, S. (1984). Meaning and myth in the study of lives: A Sartrean perspective. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Charon, R. (2006). Narrative medicine: Honoring the stories of illness. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Charon, R., & Montello, M. (2002). Stories matter: The role of narrative in medical ethics. New York: Routledge.

Cheston, R. (1996). Stories and metaphors: Talking about the past in a psychotherapy group for people with dementia. Aging and Society, 16, 579-602.

Cheung, M. (1998). What is narrative? Its implications for clinical social work practice. Manitoba Social Worker, 30(1), 5-8.

Clandinin, J., & Connelly, M. (2000). Narrative Inquiry: Experience and story in qualitative research. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Clark, P. G. (2001). Narrative gerontology in clinical practice: Current applications and future prospects. In G. Kenyon, P. Clark, & B. de Vries (Eds.), Narrative gerontology: Theory, research, and practice (pp. 193-214). New York: Springer.

Cobley, P. (2001). Narrative. London: Routledge.

Cohler, B. (1993). Aging, morale, and meaning: The nexus of narrative. In T. Cole, W. Achenbaum, P. Jakobi, & R. Kastenbaum (Eds.). Voices and visions of aging: Toward a critical gerontology (pp. 107-133). New York: Springer.

Cole, T., & de Medeiros, K. (2001). Life stories: Aging and the human spirit. [Video]. Washington, DC: Old Dog Productions. (Available from New River Media: www.nrmedia.com.)

Coleman, P. (1999). Creating a life story: The task of reconciliation. The Gerontologist, 39(2), 133-139.

Coles, R. (1989). The call of stories: Teaching and the moral imagination. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Connelly, M. & Clandinin, J. (1990). Stories of experience and narrative inquiry. Educational Researcher, 19(5), 2-14.

Connelly, M., & Clandinin, J. (1995). Personal and professional knowledge landscapes: A matrix of relations. Teachers’ professional knowledge landscapes (pp. 25-35). New York: Teachers College Press.

Conway, M. (1995). Autobiographical knowledge and autobiographical memories. In D. Rubin (Ed.), Remembering our past: Studies in autobiographical memory (pp. 67-93). Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Cooper, J. E. (1991). Telling our own stories: The reading and writing of journals or diaries. In C. Witherell & N. Nodding (Eds.), Stories lives tell: Narrative and dialogue in education (pp. 96-112). New York: Teachers College Press, Columbia University.

Cottle, T. (2002). On narratives and the sense of self. Qualitative Inquiry, 8(5), 535-549.

Couser, G. (1997). Recovering bodies: Illness, disability, and life writing. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press.

Cowley, G., & Springer, K. (1995, April). Rewriting life stories. Newsweek, 70-72.

Crisp, J. (1995). Making sense of the stories that people with Alzheimer’s tell: A journey with my mother. Nursing Inquiry, 2, 133-140.

Crites, S. (1971). The narrative quality of experience. Journal of the American Academy of Religion, 39 (3), 290-311.

Crites, S. (1979). The aesthetics of self-deception. Soundings, 62, 107-129.

Crites, S. (1986). Storytime: Recollecting the past and projecting the future. In T. Sarbin (Ed.), Narrative psychology: The storied nature of human conduct (pp. 152-173). New York: Praeger.

Crossan, J. D. (1975). The dark interval: Towards a theology of story. Niles, IL: Argus Communications.

Crossley, M. (2003). Formulating narrative psychology: The limitations of contemporary social constructionism. Narrative Inquiry, 13(2), 287-300.

Csikszentimihalyi, M. & Beattie, O. (1979). Life themes: a theoretical and empirical exploration of their origins and efforts. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 19(1), 45-63.

Culler, J. (1997). Literary theory: A very short introduction. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.

Cupitt, D. (1991). What is a story? London: SCM.

Daloz, L. A. (1986). Effective teaching and mentoring: Realizing the transformational power of adult learning experiences. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Damasio, A. (1994). Descartes’ error: Emotion, reason, and the human brain. New York: HarperCollins.

Damasio, A. (1999). The feeling of what happens: Body and emotion in the making of consciousness. San Diego, CA: Harcourt.

DasGupta, S., & Hurst, M. (2007). Stories of illness and healing: Women write their bodies. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press.

Davies, B., & Harré, R. (1990). Positionings: The discursive production of selves. Journal of Theory and Social Behaviour, 20, 43-63.

Davis, L. (2004). Risky stories: Speaking and writing in colonial spaces. Native Studies Review, 15(1), 1-20.

de Medeiros, K. (2007). Beyond the memoir: Telling life stories using multiple literary forms. Journal of Aging, Humanities, and the Arts, 1, 159-167.

Denborough, D. (Ed.). (2006). Trauma: Narrative responses to traumatic experiences. Adelaide, AU: Dulwich Centre Publications.

Dennett, D. (1991). Consciousness explained. Boston: Little, Brown.

Derrida, J. (1974). Of grammatology (G.Spivak, Trans.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

de Vries, B., Birren, J. E., & Deutschman, D. M. (1995). Method and uses of the guided autobiography. In B. K. Haight & J. D. Webster (Eds.), The art and science of reminiscing: Theory, research, methods, and applications (pp. 165-176). Washington, DC: Taylor & Francis.

de Vries, B., & Lehman, A.(1996). The complexity of personal narratives. In J. Birren, G. Kenyon, J.-E. Ruth, J. Schroots, & T. Svensson (Eds.), Aging and biography: Explorations in adult development (pp. 149-166). New York: Springer.

Dillard, A. (1987). To fashion a text. In W. Zinsser (Ed.), Inventing the truth: The art and craft of memoir (pp. 55- 76). Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Drewery, W., & Winslade, J. (1997). The theoretical story of narrative therapy. In G. Monk, J. Winslade, K. Crocket, & D. Epson (Eds.), Narrative therapy in practice: The archaeology of hope (pp. 32-51). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Duvall, J., & Beres, L. (2007).  Movements of identity: A map for therapeutic conversations about trauma.  In C. Brown & T. Augusta-Scott (Eds.), Narrative therapy: Making meaning, making lives (pp. 229-250).  Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Eagleton, T. (1996). The illusions of postmodernism. Oxford, England: Blackwell Publishing.

Eakin, P. (1985). Fictions in autobiography: Studies in the art of self-invention. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Eakin, P. (1999). How our lives become stories: Making selves. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

Edley, N., & Wetherell, M. (1997). Jockeying for position: The construction of masculine identities. Discourse & Society, 8, 203-217.

Edley, N., & Wetherell, M. (2001). Jekyll and Hyde: Men's constructions of feminism and feminists. Feminism & Psychology, 11, 439-457.

Edmundson, M. (2004). Why Read? New York: Bloomsbury.

Einstein, G., & Flanagan, O. (2003). Sexual identities and narratives of self. In G. Fireman, T. McVay, & O. Flanagan (Eds.), Narrative and consciousness: Literature, psychology, and the brain (pp. 209-231). Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.

Eliade, M. (1963). Myth and reality. (W. Trask, Trans.). New York: Harper & Row.

Epston, D., Morris, F., & Maisel, R. (1995). A narrative approach to so-called anorexia/bulimia. Journal of Feminist Family Therapy, 17(1/2), 69-96.

Eron, J., & Lund, T. (1996). Narrative solutions in brief therapy. New York: Guilford Press.

Fauconnier, G., and Turner, M. (2002). The way we think: Conceptual blending and the mind’s hidden complexities. New York: Basic Books.

Feinstein, D., Krippner, S., & Granger, D. (1988). Mythmaking and human development. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 28(3), 23-50.

Ferguson, N. (Ed.). (1997). Virtual history: Alternatives and counterfactuals. London: Papermac.

Fireman, G., McVay, T., Jr., & Flanagan, O. (Eds.). (2003). Narrative and consciousness: Literature, psychology, and the brain. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.

Fivush, R. (1994). Constructing narrative, emotion, and self in parent-child conversations about the past. In U. Neisser & R. Fivush (Eds.), The Remembering Self: Construction and Accuracy in the Self-narrative (pp. 136-157). Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Fivush, R. (2004). The silenced self: Constructing self from memories spoken and unspoken. In D. Beike, J. Lampinen, & D. Behrend (Eds.), The self and memory (pp. 75-93). New York: Psychology Press.

Fivush, R., Haden, C., & Reese, E. (1995). Remembering, recounting, and reminiscing: The development of autobiographical memory in social context. In D. Rubin (Ed.), Remembering our past: Studies in autobiographical memory (pp. 341-359). Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Flanagan, O. (1992). Consciousness reconsidered. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Flynn, D. (1991). Community as story: A comparative study of community in Canada, England, and the Netherlands. The Rural Sociologist, 11(2), 24-35.

Frank, A. (1995). The wounded storyteller: Body, illness, and ethics. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Freedman, J., & Combs, G. (1996). Narrative therapy: The social construction of preferred realities. New York: W.W. Norton.

Freedman, J. & Combs, G. (2002). Narrative therapy with couples…and a whole lot more!: A collection of papers, essays and exercises. Adelaide: Dulwich Centre Publications.

Freedman, J., Epston, D. & Lobovits, D. (1997). Playful approaches to serious problems: Narrative therapy with children and their families. New York: W.W. Norton.

Freeman, M. (1991). Rewriting the self: Development as moral practice. In M. Tappan & M. Packer (Eds.), Narrative and storytelling: Implications for understanding moral development (pp. 83-101). Special Issue of New Directions for Child Development, 54. Editor-in-Chief: William Damon. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Freeman, M. (1993). Rewriting the self: History, memory, narrative. London: Routledge.

Freeman, M. (1997a). Death, narrative integrity, and the radical challenge of self-understanding: A reading of Tolstoy’s Death of Ivan Ilych. Ageing and Society, 17, 373-398.

Freeman, M. (1997b). Why narrative?: Hermeneutics, historical understanding, and the significance of stories. Journal of Narrative and Life History, 7(1-4), 169-176.

Freeman, M. (1998). Mythical time, historical time, and the narrative fabric of the self. Narrative Inquiry, 8, 27-50.

Freeman, M. (1999a). Culture, narrative, and the poetic construction of selfhood. Journal of Constructivist Psychology, 12, 99-116.

Freeman, M. (1999b). Life narratives, the poetics of selfhood, and the redefinition of psychological theory. In W. Maiers, B. Bayer, B. Esgalhado, R. Jorna, & E. Schraube (Eds.), Challenges to theoretical psychology (pp. 245-250). Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Captus University Publications.

Freeman, M. (2000). When the story’s over: Narrative foreclosure and the possibility of self-renewal. In M. Andrews, S. Slater, C. Squire, & A. Treacher (Eds.), Lines of narrative: Psychosocial perspectives (pp. 81-91). London: Routledge.

Freeman, M. (2001). From substance to story: Narrative, identity, and the reconstruction of the self. In J. Brockmeier & D. Carbaugh (Eds.), Narrative and identity: Studies in autobiography, self and culture (pp. 283-298). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Freeman, M. (2002a). The burden of truth: Psychoanalytic poeisis and narrative understanding. In W. Patterson (Ed.), Strategic narrative: New perspectives on the power of personal and cultural stories (pp. 9-27). Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

Freeman, M. (2002b). Charting the narrative unconscious: Cultural memory and the challenge of autobiography. Narrative Inquiry, 12(1), 193-211.

Freeman, M. (2002c). The presence of what is missing: Memory, poetry, and the ride home. In R. Pellegrini & T. Sarbin (Eds.), Between fathers and sons: Critical incident narratives in the development of men’s lives (pp. 165-176). Binghamton, NY: Haworth Clinical Practice Press.

Freeman, M. (2003a). From self to soul: The theological moment of the life story. Conference presentation. International Reminiscence and Life Review Conference. Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Freeman, M. (2003b). Rethinking the fictive, reclaiming the real: Autobiography, narrative time, and the burden of truth. In G. Fireman, T. McVay, & O. Flanagan (Eds.), Narrative and consciousness: Literature, psychology, and the brain (pp. 115-128). New York: Oxford University Press.

Freeman, M. (2004). Life and literature: Continuities and discontinuities. In W. Randall, D. Furlong, T. Poitras (Eds.) Narrative Matters 2004: The power of story in a postmodern world (pp. 362-376). [Conference Proceedings.] Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada: St. Thomas University.

Freeman, M. (2006). Life “on holiday”? In defense of big stories. Narrative Inquiry, 16(1), 133-138.

Freeman, M., & Brockmeier, J. (2001). Narrative integrity: Autobiographical identity and the meaning of the “good life.” In J. Brockmeier & D. Carbaugh (Eds.), Narrative and identity: Studies in autobiography, self and culture (pp. 75-99). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Fromholt, P., Larsen, P., & Larsen, S. (1995). Effects of late-onset depression and recovery on autobiographical memory. Journals of Gerontology, 50 (2), 74-81.

Frye, N. (1963). The keys to dreamland. The educated imagination (pp.34-44). Toronto, Ontario: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

Fulford, R. (1999). The triumph of narrative: Storytelling in an age of mass culture. Toronto, Ontario: Anansi.

Gardner, H. (1982). The making of a storyteller. Psychology Today, March, 49-63.

Gardner, D. (1997). New perspectives: Stories and life stories in therapy with older adults. In K. Dwivedi (Ed.), The therapeutic use of stories (pp. 211-226). London: Routledge.

Gardner, J. (1985). The art of fiction: Notes on craft for young writers. New York: Vintage.

Garland, J. (1994). What splendour, it all coheres: Life-review therapy with older people. In J. Bornat (Ed.), Reminiscence reviewed: Evaluations, achievements, perspectives, (pp. 21-31). Buckingham, England: Open University Press.

Gearing, B. (1999). Narratives of identity among former professional footballers in the United Kingdom. Journal of Aging Studies, 13(1), 43-58.

Gergen, K. (1992). The saturated self: Dilemmas of identity in contemporary life. New York: Basic Books.

Gergen, K. (1994). Mind, text, and society: Self-memory in social context. In U. Neisser & R. Fivush (Eds.). The remembering self: Construction and accuracy in the self-narrative (pp. 78-104). Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Gergen, M., & Gergen, K. (1984). The social construction of narrative accounts. In K. Gergen & M. Gergen (Eds.), Historical social psychology (pp. 173-189). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Gerrig, R. J. (1993). Experiencing narrative worlds: On the psychological activities of reading. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Gerrig, R. & Rapp, D. (2004). Psychological processes underlying literary impact. Poetics Today, 25(2), 265-281.

Gibbs, R., Jr. (1994). The poetics of mind: Figurative thought, language, and understanding. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Glover, J. (1988). I: The philosophy and psychology of personal identity. London: Penguin.

Gold, J. (2001). Read for your life: Literature as a life support system. Markham, Ontario: Fitzhenry & Whiteside. (Original work published 1990.)

Gold, J. (2002). The story species: Our life-literature connection. Markham, Ontario: Fitzhenry & Whiteside.

Goldberg, M. (1991). Theology and narrative: A critical introduction. Philadelphia: Trinity Press International.

Goolishian, H. (1990). Therapy as a linguistic system: Hermeneutics, narrative and meaning. The Family Psychologist, 6, 44-45.

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